Paddling Planet

May 30, 2017

Paddles with an Anas acuta
Paddles with an Anas acuta.... unashamedly biased towards the kayak of that name

Arran

Crossing Loch Fyne in mirror calm last week, Arran behind us. It has been a long time since I touched this blog so I've got a lot of catching up to do. Maybe just too much paddling.....

by Peter Bisset (noreply@blogger.com) at May 30, 2017 09:00 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Mon 29/05-2017 Day 66

Pos: 56.0506,-134.1566 Loc: Howard Cove Acc: tent Dist: 56,7 km Start: 04:00 End: 15:40
This tombolo beach stayed, different to the last one, far out dry, and I had a safe sleep on my beach spot. We got up very early again to make the most out of the easy weather day! Just around the island, we ran almost into a whale diving so close to the small neighbor island and the thick kelp bed we guessed he might be stuck? The wide thick kelp bed was also the bedroom (and probably also living room) of maybe 200 sea otters or more! What a wildlife! I would love to get a small sea otter plush doll, a mom otter with a baby otter on her tummy, swimming on their back, they are soooooo cute! The crossing we were up to was long and not too interesting, besides the usual dozens of whale spouts. It was so calm we even had longer chats which I enjoyed very much. Mike is not always so talkative! I do not at all need to talk all the time on paddling, but also do not enjoy to paddle 100 m or further apart where one could not even shout to the other a comment for this or that. I love to share the excitement! Or to make notice if one need to stop or even may be in distress.
We paddled along Warren Island, and Mike knew thank goodness a beach on this side with a fresh water stream which I had overseen on my sat images, and we could fill up the urgent needed water. We were not sure if we’d like to stop on the Spanish Island, or to go further around Cape Decision and to land in Howard Cove. as the afternoon wind was even lower than the morning, so it would be a sin not to keep on going as long as possible! Later I spotted even another beach in the next bay we could have take, but this one was fine! It was just such a long paddle into the bay!
Cape Decision had a lighthouse with a building which looked manned to me, but there was no one (any more). It had a long high up landing jetty from a calm bay which logs were partly burnt. The metal staircase ladder would have been suitable to land a small motorboat with solid rubber fenders, but unfortunately not our small fragile kayaks. So it was again beach camping!
I was checking the river mouth for animal footprints while Mike was still unloading his kayak. I found many of the usual deer tracks, but also a few bear paws – and a dead eagle. Mike pulled a relatively fresh huge bone off a possible upland camp spot, which he thought was from a moose. Both got thrown into the water…I hope this will keep the hungry bears and wolves away for the night?
I also hoped we would camp close together for protection, and Mike would light his usual fire. I suggested a double beach spot between logs, but he wanted rather a certain spot in the woods which I guessed would be easily also good for two. But he rather said that this one would take only *his* tent…ok, then I’ll take the beach! I do not need to camp close together, not even on a bear beach! Actually, I don’t *need* to form a strong team of two at all, I’m able to look after myself, but was that what I was looking for when searching for a paddling partner?
Mike eventually got it, and came down to the beach to camp, with our usual fire. We’ll be sleeping nicely and safe, I hope! It will be another long good weather paddling day tomorrow! And with lots of talking, hopefully…

by Freya at May 30, 2017 02:44 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 287/05-2017 Day 65

Pos: 55.6793,-133.6709 Loc: Hendida Island Acc: tent Dist: 51,9 km Start: 04:10 End: 15:00
We decided to start very early today to catch the outgoing tide north. I paddled through a rock gap right after our cove, but had to wait for a while until it was safe to pass. Mike was close to outside, but finally also passed. I would not have blamed him to do so! The crossing over to Cape Addington was easy going. The wind was low, but blowing out of the Island Triangle NE, before it eventually turned more E and SE. This side of Cape Addington was already dead calm, how would the other side be today? It could only be better than yesterday!
A bunch of Sport Fishing boats speeded around the Cape, one of them stopped by us right before the cape for a chat, but I was just about to enter a heavy swirling current, and did just wave but not stop to not get drifted anywhere. I wanted to be in the rock gap with the sea lions! This was the day to watch them, no breakers in the gap! What a family life – again and again when I see them, they are fascinating! Grunting, barking, farting, burping, a whole concert! We did not come too close, but as usual some of them jumped off and formed a small “navy fleet” to chase us away. It was quite a magic place with impressive rock formations!
The offshore side was dead calm today, a perfect choice to paddle this exposed outer island. About six boats were floating along the coast for fishing, we enjoyed every single mile! Three big sandy bays were lurking, but it was way to early and too easy paddling to stop already! Mike had pleasure to paddle a 3,5 km detour deep into Roller bay, the most exposed and not sheltered sandy bay of the outer islands. But today, it was tame! Dozens of whales spouted everywhere around us, it was almost too common now to point them out to each other! The same as eagles, the are just everywhere!
I was not expecting we would be happy to cover so easy so much distance today, and was not looking further ahead than Noyes Island on my satellite images! That was a mistake, as on the next islands were not any campsites to be found besides the lucky shot of a white shell tombolo on a small island. One try before on Princessa Island looked good from the distance, but was completely rocky on the bottom.
Sure we both remembered our wte night on that other tombolo, but today was high tide at 4 am way below the upper beach sites, so the 40 cm more of the night’s tide would be absolute safe. Still, Mike enjoyed to clear cut a probably old upland campsite which would have taken both tents, but I love to rather stay at the beach when it is safe to stay dry! I left the “wimp” upper site for Mike, his nerves are less strong than mine ūüėČ
A small stinky dead seal carcass decorated first Mike’s upper site, which amazingly had it’s guts completely removed and the fur was turned inside out. This couldn’t have been done by an animal?? How did it get there?

by Freya at May 30, 2017 01:06 am

Océanos de Libertad

Atardecer en Picadas

P1210014

P1210017

Para los que por desgracia vivimos tan lejos del mar, los embalses son nuestro √ļnico consuelo...tarde del domingo en el embalse de Picadas, aprovechando la bajada de temperaturas y los espor√°dicos chaparrones.

Dedicamos la tarde a practicar esquimotajes y control de kayak...y entre kayak y kayak, un poquito de natación remolcando el kayak...aunque para la próxima me llevo el cabo de remolque y las gafas...y asi hacemos un duathlon acuático.


P1210011

by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at May 30, 2017 01:10 am

May 29, 2017

NORCAL YAK
Northern California kayaking adventures

Everything you need to know about kayaking -- not

Hundreds of kayaking Web sites and blogs… …offer essential instructions and insights to help paddlers hone their skills. This particular post is not among them. Instead, as we launch another prime...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 29, 2017 08:41 pm

Biking and Hiking and Kayaking
Ramblings of an outdoor person trapped indoors.

Memorial Day Meanderings, Much Moisture

DavDeale ride

Started off the Memorial Day weekend with a 53 mile cycliing loop, from Davidsonville down to Deale and then back up on a different route than I've done before. Many nice, small country roads around Lothian before connecting back to the usual roads back into the Davidsonville Park & Ride. We've been having rain every day for weeks, so I got out early to try to take advantage of what looked like a gap in rain clouds on the radar.

20170527_095007

It stayed cloudy and cool, but dry, as I biked into Galesville, where a church group was cleaning up the cemetery and a women's art group had set up easels on the town dock to paint the shades of grey as the clouds reflected off of the West River. From there it was small country roads down to Deale (above) where they could have painted similar scenes on Rockhold Creek where it meets the Chesapeake Bay. I saw other groups cleaning up other cemeteries - a great Memorial Day tradition.

One of the roads to Deale is on the route to the town dump and I had to dodge many pieces of brush that dropped off of the trailers the many homeowner SUVs were pulling to the dump, but no close calls - very courteous drivers, outside of not strapping down their loads!

At about the 40 mile mark I was pushing up a small hill and a large group of  multi-hued cyclists was coming downhill in the opposite direction and I figured it had to be a Potomac Pedalers ride - sure enough I heard Kelly yell out "Hey, John" - apparently they were doing a ride from Southern High School to Chesapeake Beach that started later.

I got back to the start just as rain started - perfect timing for a nice 53 miler.

Hike

On Sunday, Carl and I stopped in at the Maryland FM Hamfest and then did an old favorite hike nearby, 4.2 miles around the McKeldin area of Patapsco Valley State Park. Loads of people there - I guess we haven't often hiked holiday weekends there.

20170528_110207

Lots of horsies out, too - many with people on their backs. Thankfully, none of the horses left piles of political statements on the paths.

20170528_114917

All of the recent rain made the trails quite muddy but also made the small falls much more impressive.

20170528_115010

The time of year, combined with all the rain, also made for a bumper crop of blooming mountain laurel, though the McKeldin area doesn't have that many of them.

Flood

When I got home, apparently Carole had gotten mad at the washing machine, because it has been refusing to actually fill up the drum for the rinse cycle. She denies this, but allegedly she retaliated by beating on it with her Manolo Blahniks and washer emptied all the water onto the laundry room floor. I should have done a longer hike, as I arrived just in time to take over the grunt work while Carole tottered away to an exercise class.

Mem day
All in all, a nice weekend with a bonus day off coming to be thankful for the efforts of those who have enabled me to enjoy all this, other than the mopping part.

 

 

by John P. at May 29, 2017 11:34 am

Newfoundland Sea Kayaking
"Some things were made for one thing, for me, that one thing is the Sea" Hey Ocean!

Belize Trip - Day #3 Water Caye to Billy Hawk Caye


On Day # 3 our plan was to do some more snorkeling outside the reef early in the morning, then head over to Twin Cayes and do some exploring of the mangroves, hopefully see a caiman. After that, head across to the Blue Ground Range and possibly camp at Hangman's Caye.ÔĽŅÔĽŅÔĽŅ


Always start the day off with a good cup of coffee. Robbie's expresso maker was the most important piece of kit we had!



Some pics from our early morning snorkel:
ÔĽŅ


ÔĽŅÔĽŅ




ÔĽŅ
Our route for the day
After our morning snorkel, we headed across to explore Twin Cayes. Lots of cool little mangrove 'tunnels' to sneak into. I love the places that you can get in a kayak. We heard there are caiman in this area, so we kept our eyes open, but didn't have any luck.

2km crossing to Twin Caye
Exploring the mangroves

Making our way around
A lot of little nooks and crannys to check out
We saw a big splash here, but couldn't find the creature that made it. Maybe a caiman?!
Next, a 4km crossing to Hangman's Caye. Saw some dolphins and a sea turtle along the way
It got really hot!
The 4km crossing got pretty hot, 38.4C. There was absolutely no wind also. I thought I was going to perish. Making crossings like this, in the mid day heat, with no breeze to cool you off can be a bad idea! By the time we got to Hangman's Caye, I was really overheated, had to unzip my pfd and keep dunking my hat in the water to cool off. The water was 28C, so that didn't help much either. When we finally landed, we all sat in the water up to our necks to get our core temps back down. I was pretty much done at this point, and wanted to camp on Hangman's, but I have to admit, it wasn't the best location for camping.

Landing at Hangman's Caye
Not the best place in the world to camp, but from what I understand, there are no camping fees
After a small lunch, and a chance to cool down, Rob convinced me to paddle another 4kms to Billy Hawk Caye. In hindsight, it was a very good decision, but I have to admit, I wasn't too fussy on moving at that point!ÔĽŅÔĽŅ

Lots of islands in the Blue Ground Range
How I kept the sun off my head. Next time, maybe a wide brimmed hat?
Very happy to finally see Billy Hawk Caye
What a welcome site.
Alex Sabal and his family own and run Billy Hawk Caye Campground. What a spot, and boy did we ever feel lucky to be there.

More on our stay at Billy Hawk on my next post.....ÔĽŅÔĽŅÔĽŅ

by Brian Newhook (noreply@blogger.com) at May 29, 2017 08:03 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 287/05-2017 Day 65

Pos: 55.6793,-133.6709 Loc: Hendida Island Acc: tent Dist: 51,9 km Start: 04:10 End: 15:00
We decided to start very early today to catch the outgoing tide north. I paddled through a rock gap right after our cove, but had to wait for a while until it was safe to pass. Mike was close to outside, but finally also passed. I would not have blamed him to do so! The crossing over to Cape Addington was easy going. The wind was low, but blowing out of the Island Triangle NE, before it eventually turned more E and SE. This side of Cape Addington was already dead calm, how would the other side be today? It could only be better than yesterday!
A bunch of Sport Fishing boats speeded around the Cape, one of them stopped by us right before the cape for a chat, but I was just about to enter a heavy swirling current, and did just wave but not stop to not get drifted anywhere. I wanted to be in the rock gap with the sea lions! This was the day to watch them, no breakers in the gap! What a family life – again and again when I see them, they are fascinating! Grunting, barking, farting, burping, a whole concert! We did not come too close, but as usual some of them jumped off and formed a small “navy fleet” to chase us away. It was quite a magic place with impressive rock formations!
The offshore side was dead calm today, a perfect choice to paddle this exposed outer island. About six boats were floating along the coast for fishing, we enjoyed every single mile! Three big sandy bays were lurking, but it was way to early and too easy paddling to stop already! Mike had pleasure to paddle a 3,5 km detour deep into Roller bay, the most exposed and not sheltered sandy bay of the outer islands. But today, it was tame! Dozens of whales spouted everywhere around us, it was almost too common now to point them out to each other! The same as eagles, the are just everywhere!
I was not expecting we would be happy to cover so easy so much distance today, and was not looking further ahead than Noyes Island on my satellite images! That was a mistake, as on the next islands were not any campsites to be found besides the lucky shot of a white shell tombolo on a small island. One try before on Princessa Island looked good from the distance, but was completely rocky on the bottom.
Sure we both remembered our wte night on that other tombolo, but today was high tide at 4 am way below the upper beach sites, so the 40 cm more of the night’s tide would be absolute safe. Still, Mike enjoyed to clear cut a probably old upland campsite which would have taken both tents, but I love to rather stay at the beach when it is safe to stay dry! I left the “wimp” upper site for Mike, his nerves are less strong than mine ūüėČ
A small stinky dead seal carcass decorated first Mike’s upper site, which amazingly had it’s guts completely removed and the fur was turned inside out. This couldn’t have been done by an animal?? How did it get there?

by Freya at May 29, 2017 01:08 am

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Havheng del 2 - Vestre Oks√ły til Annfinnslett

Havheng del 2. Du finner del 1 HER, om du ikke har lest den. Det regnet om natta, og p√• Rotv√¶r (utenfor L√łdingen, n√¶rmeste m√•lestasjon) var det frisk bris om natta, og liten og stiv kuling p√• morgenen. Det merket vi veldig lite til, her var det fredelig p√• vindfronten - og sola sto opp f√łr oss. Det rareste var at det skulle ha dreid til nord√łst i l√łpet av natta, men her var det enn√• s√łrvest da vi sto opp, og til laaangt utp√• dagen. Pussig.

Vi testet ut mobilfri tur, men som vi ser betyr ikke det totalforbud. Man må jo kunne sjekke værmelding og ta bilder, for eksempel. Men en oppfordring om å legge mobilen bort "i plenum". Tror det er mange fler enn bare meg som kunne ha nytte av å tenke gjennom mobilbruken både på tur og ellers.

Det var et fantastisk v√¶r denne formiddagen. Vi hadde ingen hast med √• komme oss p√• havet, her var det f√łrst og fremst bare √• nyte dagen.

Det gjorde vi ogs√•, blant annet gikk vi oss en tur i skogen p√• √łya. Man skal nemlig ikke g√• langt f√łr det blir trolsk skog med mosegrodde tr√¶r.

Hengek√łyetr√¶r er det her ogs√•.

Noen har blitt revet overende. Men det har ikke treet brydd seg så mye om - det bare vokser videre. De fleste tynne trærne vi ser i bildet kommer nemlig ut av stammen på det svære vi ser undersiden av her.

Noen nedfallstr√¶r kan brukes til stige. Jan Viggo syntes det var litt rar bekledning for √• klatre i tr√¶r, men det var n√• det jeg hadde p√• meg, og jeg ville se oppi et reir uten √• skremme fuglen... Det var  tomt.

Som jeg mente √• huske var det et noks√• stort grunt omr√•de nord for leirplassen. St√łvelen syntes jeg ikke hadde noe der √• gj√łre, s√• den tok jeg med og la sammen med resten av s√łppelet.

Havheng-deltakere i giv akt. Dette er et flott sted for å plukke skjell, veldig mye korallsand her. Og skjell.

Foto: Stein-Evert Pettersen
Like etterpå så vi disse to. Sjekking i ettertid tyder på polarsnipe.

Etter spasertur, strandrydding og n√łdvendig nedpakking satte vi ut i fortsatt nydelige omgivelser med kurs nesten hjemover. F√łrst padlet vi litt utover - for den meldte vinden hadde enn√• ikke kommet, og den som var kom fra "riktig" - ikke meldt - retning.

Synes det er nesten like mye sn√ł igjen i fjellene n√• som det var i midten av april i fjor. Mulig jeg husker feil.

En eling ned mot Lofoten ga mulighet for kule motlysbilder.

Vi tar med et h√łydebilde ogs√•. Herlig lys, dette er yndlingsv√¶ret mitt.

Det ble en flott padletur, selv om det vel ble ettermiddag f√łr vi kom oss utp√•. Det mest spesielle vi s√• av fugl var √•tte tjyvjo i flokk. De ser jeg som regel enkeltvis, eller i par. En hel flokk har jeg ikke sett f√łr. Alle var den "lyse" varianten. T√łffe er de i hvert fall.

A propos t√łff, s√• er kajakken til Sara ganske s√• t√łff p√• bilder.

Stein-Evert og en varde.

Jan Viggo og en regnbue.

Det var ganske langfj√¶re i dag (maks dagen etter). Vi tok lunsjpause, eller mer middag tidsmessig, p√• Ravn√łya. Der er en veldig kul sandstrand, som liksom deler √łya. Det er strand p√• begge sider. Tror ikke det fl√łr over her i normalt v√¶r, men det er strand p√• midten ogs√•. Men selv om det var langfj√¶re s√• var det nok ikke denne vi s√• kvelden f√łr. Det var i grunnen ikke √• vente, det l√• jo √łyer imellom uansett.

P√• Ravn√łya bodde denne her, som poserte villig for fotografen. Tror ikke han kan ha sett et kamera f√łr, for han virket nysgjerrig.

Tok ikke et skikkelig bilde av stranda dessverre, dette f√•r duge. Med litt fantasi kan dere skj√łnne tegninga.

Foto: Stein-Evert Pettersen
Jeg tok med meg en sekk strands√łppel fra Ravn√łya. Kun plast, alt sammen. (Se bakdekk til h√łyre.)

Nå bar det ganske strake veien tilbake til bilene, var planen.

Men s√• oppdaget Stein-Evert noe d√łdmannsh√•nd. Siden det var langfj√¶re var det diverse morsomt √• se akkurat i vannlinja. Jeg fikk fanget en stor eremittkreps, for eksempel. Den var kul.

Jeg fant ogs√• flere slike bortetter berget, like over vannet. Pussig sak. Dere ser det som er i hj√łrnet?

Den ser s√•nn her ut n√•r man har skyllet vann over den. En stor frynsesnegle, visstnok. Google den s√• f√•r du se hvordan den ser ut under vann - superkul, sp√łr du meg. (Men jeg h√¶rtes ikke √• holde den i h√•nden under vann.)

Fantastisk flott tur med mye innhold til √• v√¶re bare et d√łgn. Takk for turen alle sammen, havheng tror jeg vi m√• ha flere ganger, eller hur?

by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at May 29, 2017 12:38 am

May 28, 2017

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 28th - Discovery Island (#36)

Lanny and I went for a Sunday morning out to the islands. I was in my Tahe and Lanny in his  black pearl, so we were both paddling Greenland style paddles and boats!
There was a pretty strong ebb running all morning as you can see from the track across Baynes. On the way out my speed reached 15 kph at times! We saw gene and a group from Nanaimo who were paddling from Victoria to Nanaimo over several days.
Plenty of seals, a few rhinoceros auklets and black oystercatchers noticed.
click to embiggen!
16 km, YTD 320 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 28, 2017 11:37 pm

May 22 - RVYC (#35)

Jack and I went out for an evening SUP session over to the yacht club and back. A glorious evening, with views all the way to Mt. Rainier. I forgot the GPS, so this is a manually created track!
click to enlarge
2 km, YTD 304 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 28, 2017 11:33 pm

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

Heat and light - here comes summer...

The last week has seen some superb early summer weather across the British Isles. A southerly airflow brought warm air and temperatures soared.  The southern shore of the Moray Firth fared particularly well; in southerly winds it has a unique micro climate and for a few days it was the hottest part of Britain with temperatures approaching 30 degrees Celsius.





Lorna, Allan and I decided on a paddle from Hopeman to take advantage of the beautiful weather, setting out from the harbour heading eastwards.  Bright sunshine and a very calm sea combined in a dazzling quality of light which reached deep below the surface.






This part of the coast is composed largely of a sandstone named for Hopeman itself - the Hopeman Sandstone Formation.  A yellowish aeolian sandstone of varying hardness, some of the beds were deposited by sheet floods and are of early Triassic age.  Fossils are found in the beds, including dinosaur footprints.  One quality of the sandstone is that it's brightly coloured and breaks down to give sandy bays......





...another quality is that it's less tough than some rock types, so caves are quite common here.






We threaded in and out of cool caves and paddled through arches spanning clear green pools to emerge into arclight sunshine.





The rock formations aren't as high or as dramatic as other parts of the coast but give some superb sea kayaking in calm conditions.






One particularly large cave had a long side-chamber which led to......






....a tiny exit with outward flaring sides.  The quality of light here was absolutely jewel-like and we sat, entranced for some time.  Having watched through several minutes, we felt that the exit was just too low to attempt a passage to the outside.  It was near high water and we resolved to take another look on the return leg.






Several incut bays folowed as we headed east - I've paddled this coast several times and always find it an engaging and interesting place to explore.  In any kind of swell it's a bit of a different place though.....






The creeler "Calypso" lost power whilst lifting pots off the coast during the evening of 30th April and drifted onto the rocks.  The owner/skipper managed to get off unhurt but "Calypso" has begun to break up after just a couple of weeks exposed to the swell.






We took a quick leg stretch on one of the pebble beaches......





...before heading further along the coast and past the two-legged stack which always looks remarkably precarious!





Luncheon was taken on a beach of golden sand backed by dunes near Covesea lighthouse, relaxing in the sunshine and with a pleasant onshore breeze which had started up in the heat of the afternoon.





After lunch we headed back with the breeze on our backs, past the Sculptor's Cave which contains Pictish carvings.






We wanted to check out the entrance to the cave we'd explored previously and found that the falling tide had made the access easy but very shallow and we were just about able to paddle through into the main cave......






...and so back out into the brilliant sunlight of a hot afternoon - hopefully the start of summer!

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 28, 2017 08:10 pm

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sat 27/05-2017 Day 64

Pos: 55.3122,-133.6560 Loc: Cape Chirikof Bay Acc: tent Dist: 30,8 km Start: 05:25 End: 15:45
A great night’s sleep! An Mike really managed to be ready to go 20 min before the agreed time at 5.30am, while I was ready only 5 min before. We’re getting there to get in sync! In general, paddling with Mike is an educational process for both of us, having been both quite strong individual paddlers beforehand. I had to hold him back already several times not to simply head off or paddle ahead to the exciting places which would be so nice to share and explore together. This was why I was looking for a paddling partner – to share the ups and downs of the day, to look after each other, to show smiling faces, and not to paddle like the other one almost would not be there or to leave him or her behind, and to be grumpy. We are getting better…and are still paddling together! Although each of us could say easy to be now going alone. It’s all about communication!
We had our early morning whale show this time with a guy spy hopping for many times, sticking his head out of the water and looking around just inside the western side of Arena cove. I can’t remember I have seen this beaviour in this extreme!? The crossing went smooth with the current with us, a bit lumpy water in the middle, but all good. The NW wind picked up to around ten to twelve knots as forecasted, but withthe current padling was not too bad.
I knew from the sat images and the chart that tehre was a channel inside Cape Bartolome which would be open water even on low tide. Well, with weeds…This was eventually looking at lowest low tide at springs like a thick kelp carpet upfront two accessible beaches, with the channel opening turning off ninety degrees to the side. Nothing really to see when approaching! It was quite a magical place! I’d have loved to stay longer to take pics, but Mike was once more far ahead and already scouting a path through the weed and rocks. I eventually followed him, but as he knew I was once more not happy with this style, he simply waited at the exit without turning around.
No guy, not with me…I turned back through the weed channel and decided to have a play at the inviting beach! I want to enjoy the day! And we had only 7,5 more km to go, and it was only 8.30 am, and just slack water. I got out, went beach combing on the logs, an found a miniature net float which I like to keep as a souvenir. Dozens of more regular size net floats, plastic bottles and other stuff were as usual trashed up the beach, when I found a narrow 2 meters wide gap on the eastern side of the eastern beach. About sixteen net floats were scattered around on the logs, I kicked them down on the sand and started to roll-kick them down the maybe 50 meters long channel. A perfect bowling lane!! I had fun! And warmed my feet with this game…
I had seen Mike just arriving back at the beach when I turned off the main beach and entered the forest to find my “Bowling Lane”. I made as much noise as possible with kicking all my sixteen plastic floats down the channel, wanting to make Mike wondering about what was going on there behind the rock wall? I expected him to show up soone or later from one end or the other, hoping he would join in my game. But he was still afloat in his kayak, as he is very reluctant to drag his kayak high up a not perfect sandy beach on the flooding tide, the bottom may get scratched! I finally arrived tat the rocky water’s edge with my sixteen floats, and showed off my game to Mike being afloat. He needs to see what he was missing!!! And probably needs also to see the solution for the noise…
Once afloat again, I played naughty kid, sticking my tongue out at him but smiled and all was good again. Mike suggested, we rather should not paddle a third time through the rocky weed channel (as on his solo way back he sat on a rock and scratched his hull…) but rather exit further out where we had spotted a sea lion colony. Well…if you like to paddle a bit longer in rough stuff on the other side…we go!
the sea lions were nice to watch, one big guy came unexpectedly with his bearded face out of the water just besides my deck bag! I wished I would have my camera ready for that shot…but a got a bunch of others.
We paddled very slowly past the colony on the rocks through the exit, and finally were on the rough open water side. I better had already donned my PFD now…it was quite lumpy out there – as to be expected! The exit through the weed channel would have been the better choice – and maybe to keep on going without beach play in between, right after slack tide for those 7,5 km…as now we had not only the 10-12 knots NW headwind to fight, but also the running up and against us current, plus reflective waves.
But Mike was as stubborn – and skill full – as I was to keep on punching through, and we paddled hard with first 4-5 km/h, later only 2-3 km/h, slowly but surely getting the relatively short distance down to reach the headland where we could turn in and relax. Three or four spots have been quite nasty, the rest hard. But we made it! Paradise was lurking!
just before we could turn in, a fishing boat came out of “our” cove. Be gone, guy! and we had a white sandy shallow wide beach with tiny surf waves, many logs and few trash just for ourselves! Wonderful nature, surrounded by limestone landslides on the steep mountains. A river was flowing to the side, and I found wonderful deep fresh water pools for my daily bath. I had been sweating a bit! Mike prefered to dry of inside his violet bunny suit as usual. I told him he was eventually smelling a bit strong, but maybe he feels safe in this way not to be “attacked” by me…hehehe… ūüôā
I reglued two patches of my under deck bag which came off, as I had used the wrong glue at home, and did some other minor repairs. See what the forecast does for tomorrow! We would love to round the notorious Cape Addington at Noyes Island, and to paddle that one on the western side. We’ll see!

by Freya at May 28, 2017 12:59 am

May 27, 2017

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Havheng, Annfinnslett til Vestre Oks√ły i Svellingan

I fjor dro jeg p√• et lite solo-havheng i midten av april. N√• involverte jeg klubben, og s√łrget for et √•pent havheng for alle. V√¶rmeldingen var suspekt p√• forh√•nd, vinglet og til dels truet. Jeg la opp en worst case plan, og vi satset p√• tur likevel. Men Stein-Evert hadde lovet √• ta med tarp, s√• dette kunne bli bra selv med noe regn.

P√• turen ut til L√łdingen Vestbygd var det som vanlig mye √• se allerede langs kj√łreturen. F√łrst rein, s√• denne karen her, og like etterp√• sprang en hare over veien. Det skal ikke st√• p√• det.

Vi testet ut en ny utsetting jeg var anbefalt av flere. Litt kortere √• kj√łre til enn Naustvika blant annet, vi satte ut fra det gamle steinbruddet ved Annfinnslett. Det var greit nok, og her skal det mer til f√łr biler blir i veien. Men det er litt shabby sted. Da vi var klare for utsetting kom det et par padlere spaserende (helt uten kajakk og utstyr, alts√•), den ene viste seg √• v√¶re bloggleser. S√• "hei damen, takk for sist" hvis du leser her n√•. :)

Utsetting gikk greit, jeg hadde med stroppene s√• vi kunne v√¶re fire stk p√• hver kajakk. Det er virkelig kjekt √• ha! Tenk at jeg har padlet s√• lenge uten. Konklusjon - man b√łr egentlig v√¶re minst 4 p√• tur med lastet kajakk. Her er de som trosset v√¶rvarslet som antydet mer enn yr p√• natta: Sara borterst, Stein-Evert og n√¶rmest Jan Viggo. De er ganske vanntette, antar jeg, i motsetning til de som ble hjemme.

Joda, det var litt grått. Litt vind var det også, men slett ikke avskrekkende. Ikke var det neglebitt-temperatur heller! Endelig!

Dette her lurte vi litt p√• hva var. Det var et pussig sted √• ha hatt en kai, det er jo en liten √ły. Og den m√•tte ha v√¶rt lang for √• n√• bort til venstre i bildet der man kunne g√•. Og den lille "veien" som var murt opp s√• ikke bredere ut enn en sti. Snodig. Hva har det v√¶rt, tro?

Det var ikke voldsomt mye √• se p√• turen, men s√• var det ganske sent og det var i hovedsak bare en transportetappe i alle fall. For litt "underholdning" underveis padlet vi rett ut til n√¶rmeste holme og fulgte litt sm√•holmer bortover. Videre rett ut s√• vi ei lita strand, men det var vrient i gr√•v√¶ret √• se hvor langt unna. Det var jo rett i retning Ramn√łya, men den skulle jo ligge p√• tvers. Kunne det v√¶re s√• lav fj√¶re? Og s√• sm√• holmer imellom? Nuvel, det fikk vi sjekke n√¶rmere senere. 6 km var det bort til √łya. P√• Rotv√¶r var det m√•lt jevnt frisk bris utover kvelden, men det hadde ikke vi s√• mye av. Hele Svellingflaket tar nok av litt ja.

Her kommer de p√• rekke og rad inn til stranda p√• Vestre Oks√ły.

Framme!

S√•nn var ruta utover. Har aktivtert Spotn n√•, s√•nn at det g√•r an √• f√łlge med hvor jeg padler om man vil.
Så var det bare å sette opp det man hadde med seg. Vi hadde jo invitert markkrypere (teltere og denslags folk) til å være med, så Sara og Jan-Viggo hadde med telt. Det er lov. Stein-Evert hadde med hammocken. Det hadde som vi ser jeg også.

Meeen siden det skulle regne og hadde et flunke nytt telt liggende utestet, s√• satte jeg ogs√• opp et bagasjetelt - Hilleberg Rogen s√• klart. Det var dessuten greit √• ha backup om det skulle bl√•se og regne sidelengs, da kunne det kanskje bli v√•tt i k√łya, hva vet jeg. Det var f√łrste test av k√łya i regn med mulig vind.

Kassen med boka st√•r her fremdeles, og det var en del som har skrevet i den siden sist, det er sk√ły. Da f√•r den st√• her videre, det er tross alt ikke s√• mange som er satt ut. 

Herlig sted! Selv om det var litt smågrått!

Men det var en del s√łppel, det s√• vi allerede p√• avstand. Du la sikkert merke til den bl√•, store sekken midt p√• stranda i forrige bilde, og denne her var ogs√• synlig p√• god avstand. Det er mye s√łppel i fj√¶ra overalt! Her l√• det str√łdd. Fysj.

 Men det var ogs√• fin natur, s√•nn som rosenroten som er i full fart n√•.

Den er fin. (Dette er litt juks, bildet er tatt dagen etter så det er sol på dråpene.)

Stein-Evert hadde som lovet tatt med tarp. Attp√•til var det en av de jeg vurderer √• kj√łpe, s√• fikk jeg sett den. For jeg skal ha tarp, det er i grunnen et must for s√•nne turer. Presenning tar for stor plass. Frisport sin var helt grei, rimelig og middels pakkst√łrrelse. Det ligger vel an til at det blir en s√•nn.

B√•l ble det ogs√•,  jeg fikk stekt ostesm√łrbr√łdet jeg hadde med. Lettvint og godt. Jan Viggo var litt sm√•misunnelig p√• oss andre som hadde diverse stoltyper med, men jeg synes n√• det s√• ut som han hadde det mest behagelig, der han l√• p√• en myk duk i lyngen, foran b√•let. Han var forresten veldig god med b√•l, det har han gjort f√łr.

S√łplete utsikt fra hengek√łya. Det m√• vi nesten gj√łre noe med. Men n√• skal det soves, etter en trivelig kveld ved b√•let.

Stay hungry? Hva er det for tull, amok, hvorfor skal man det? Jeg sovnet til fuglesang og sov egentlig ganske godt, til jeg v√•knet og hadde skikkelig vondt i hofta. Det var s√• vondt at jeg vurderte √• legge meg i teltet. Har aldri skjedd f√łr, dette. Men jeg pr√łvde √• legge meg p√• magen, og det funka. (Ja, det g√•r helt fint an √• ligge p√• magen i denne hengek√łya. Null problem.)

Da vi v√•knet langt p√• dag, var det klarnet opp! Solskinn! I l√łpet av natta hadde det v√¶rt oppi stiv kuling p√• Rotv√¶r, men det hadde vi n√• ikke merket noe til. Vinden var l√łya og enda svakere enn dagen f√łr. Ikke hadde den dreiet enn√•, heller. Hurra.

Fabelaktig flott, så hvor i all verden var du som ikke var med? Denne gikk du glipp av.

Til og med bekkeblomen har kommet i sving nå, og lyste opp.

Vi tok oss en liten ryddesjau f√łr vi forlot, blant annet fordi det var s√• fint v√¶r at vi hadde ikke noe stress med √• komme oss p√• havet. Var ikke denne (halve) brillen flott? Det var jo sol, s√• solbrille var passende √• finne.

Vi fant mye annet også, det aller meste var som vanlig plast. 97 prosent-ish.

Vi stopper her, s√• kommer det ny episode med turen tilbake litt senere. Da f√•r du blant annet se en stor frynsesnegle! Den er t√łff. Den som leser f√•r se.

by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at May 27, 2017 10:56 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 26/05-2017 Day 63

Pos: 55.2266,-133.3749 Loc: Arena Cove middle Acc: tent Dist: 29,5 km Start: 05:15 End: 12:00
Mike stayed dry down at his beach – he actually didn’t sleep between the logs, but on a grassy upland spot. We agreed to be on the water at 5.30 am, as I was estimating the Tlevak Narrows to be good about one hour after slack low tide…maybe this was rather a bit daring? We should have been on the water actually rather an hour earlier to be on the safe side.
I was speeding along with a head start being a tad bit earlier on the water than Mike which made good sense, as I had a bad feeling to be that late. Mike caught up to me about two kilometers before the narrows, and we arrived at the turn point just 35 min later than slack low tide which eventually made us working quite hard at two points, even in the eddy. I guessed another half an hour later, we would not have made it any more! The maximum flood current today on spring tide an now against us reached 10 km/h, the maxinum ebb current even 15 km/h. Quite a current spot here! Going through at perfect slack or just an hour aebb current would be just ablout ok, going on maximum ebb would have been life threatening. A sailboat came just through the narrows when we were 1 km away, he had the perfect timing. Two other smaller speed boats did obviously not have to care that much and rushed a bit later through.
We were happy to be on the other side, and saw my judgment of having no real inviting campsites here in the area was correct. We had now all time of the world to make it only to Arena Cove, our destination for the day. Going further was not suitable today either with moderate to strong headwinds. We spent some time studying the billions and billions of tiny crill animals floating in the water, I can’t remember I have seen anywhere something like that? Must be perfect whale food, to filter through those comb-like teeth – what were the named again?
We saw on a wide gravel beach on low tide something blue up on the beach – was that really dirty stupid graffity on a huge log and an alive tree? I couldn’t believe it…six guys have quite recently with year 2017 sprayed their names on both the log and the tree, is that really necessary? I imagine a (probably motorboat crew) bought the spray paint can just for such purpose, and had fun to take it to the beach and to mess up the nature in this nasty way. Plus they left some soda cans just squeezed besides it…pigs…
A round the next corner, I already reckoned we got the crew almost “caught in the act” as the paint looked so fresh to me, we spotted a small motor boat. But those were only two guys collecting see weed for eating purposes from the steep rocks. The guy on board was trying to drive the boat to the rocks that the guy on shore was able to throw the filled bags over and to jump eventually over himself. This turned out to be not as easy as they wished? Or did we make them nervous watching? The guy driving the boat was without his shirt in the warming sun, showing my old burning eyes quite a pleasant view ūüôā
When we finally turned into the wide Arena Cove, the swell was caught in there relatively nasty and I had to guide us a way through the unexpected rollers and breakers. Mike felt only a tad bit apprehensive, paddling mostly right behind me ūüôā We spotted the smaller middle beach as the place to land best, but I was also curious about the left beach hiding for a while behind a headland. But a quick peak around made us coming quickly back to the very nice and sheltered cozy small middle beach! It had real sand, and a wonderful grassy dune corner to camp on – with flowery smell from wild peas! A deluxe calm landing and campsite, with quite warm sun and full wind shelter all afternoon!
I wanted my regular afternoon dip in the bright sunshine and stripped down, today was even a hair wash on the program. Just that I had to go to the far away end of the beach where the rocks provided some shelter from the dense layer of floating wood pieces. When I looked up from my chilly hair wash, I spotted Mike on the far other side of the bay also standing in the water – fully naked! I guessed I was seeing a mirage??? The man’s body has not touched any water since we started our trip, and has stayed in his violet fleece bunny suit 24/7, and is now *naked* standing in the water??? But I think I missed his dip? Why did he already walk back to the tents?
I had to laugh when I was walking back to our camp – just about 50 m before I reached our site, he quickly slipped into a pair of shorts, as his boldness for free Alaskan beach life was obviously fading away as quickly as it arrived :-)) – he confessed he was actually only washing his one and only pair of underwear, and did neither dip his body into the cold water nor washed his violet bunny suit…as it did not itch yet, as he said! Well…
We decided to go for a walk to the western wide beach, crossing through some wonderful open forest and were happy we chose the other beach to camp on! This one was windy and not too inviting with huge piles of logs – and trash of all kind. This was the most trashy beach i came across on this trip so far! I imagine all those logs get afloat at spring tides, making probably quite some noise while smashing all those plastic floats and whatever pieces on the steep bank. A washing machine of the special kind! Some human footprints of today showed that that one small boat passing us this morning has been right here for beach combing. I wonder what they were after? We found multiple dozens of floats, barrels, fishing nets, ropes, canisters, bottles and a whole inner of a big plastic outhouse! But nothing of real interest any more.
A nice campfire with roasting marshmallows finished this perfect sunny day. I can get used to those shorter day’s of paddling! But it had made n sense to push on to cross over to baker Islands in a moderate to strong NW headwind!
The fore casts says four wonderful sunny low wind days – perfect to go outside of the rough and exposed Baker and Noyes island, with wonderful beaches!

by Freya at May 27, 2017 04:28 am

May 26, 2017

OCEANPAX Paddle / Run / Be
Reflections on life, self-propelled outdoor pursuits, and all manner of things that may come to mind while sea kayaking on the waters, and minimalist running along the trails, of south Vancouver Island and Gabriola Island in beautiful British Columbia, Canada.

Between an island and a high place...on the Salish Sea


Paddling on the Salish Sea, between Vancouver Island, and the mountainous mainland of Canada's (and North America's) dramatic west coast is a good place to think. There's lots of movement as the kayak rotates around its three axes, responding to wave action and forward momentum. It rolls, pitches, and yaws. (It also heaves, sways and surges, but I'd best leave that to professional mariners to explain.) 

Movement activates both mind and emotion, neural pathways open wide...these are the thoughts and feelings that can be trusted. Move often. :) 

by Duncan and Joan Barwise (noreply@blogger.com) at May 26, 2017 08:56 pm

DIARIO DE KAYAK
Fotos,videos y relatos de mi navegaciones en kayak de mar

COMO SENTARSE C√ďMODO EN UN KAYAK

Unos consejos para sentarte en el kayak y que remes con comodidad y que no te duela nada. La postura también es muy importante para remar más rápido y maniobrar mejor. leer mas

May 26, 2017 11:03 am

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

A Supper Club outing


What could be nicer than going out for dinner on a sunny evening?  Of course, the correct choice of venue for a Supper Club outing is important......
 





...the restaurant should offer a menu spiced with a little colour.






It goes without saying that the surroundings should be fresh and clean.....






...and the entrance should be welcoming and distinctive too.






Any small rooms should be intimate and cosy for those who choose to dine there.....






....but most important of all, there should be good food on offer, and tables with a view.....

Whilst British "fish n chips" might not be strictly an appellation d'origine controlee, eating it in the open air by the seaside just seems to add to the dining experience - food in it's place of orign.

An evening outing of the Supper Club, kayaking from Portknockie to Cullen, with fish and chips by Linda's of Cullen.  Sports recovery drink for the non-drivers, cups of tea for the drivers!  :o)

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 26, 2017 11:40 am

Woman on Water
A woman's perspective on kayaking and outdoor adventures.

Catch of the Day

I have to admit that I am not really into fishing - I like catching and eating.
Go away Mr. Sea Lion.  This lingcod and I have a dinner date.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
Rock cod season opened on the Mendocino Coast May 1.  This week we finally got the conditions and time to get our lines wet.  We decide to fish one of our usual spots.  The lack of kelp is concerning, and we weren't sure if there would be any fish to catch.

As soon as we kayak past the first guardian rocks of the bay, we drop our lines.  Almost immediately, I feel that exciting tug on my line.  "Fish-on!"  Then that tug becomes a pull and I am fighting to keep this guy from heading into the rocks.  (When hooked, rock fish like lingcod will try to escape into the underwater rocks.)  We battle as he tries to escape and I try to reel him in.  He pulls and I pull.  I gain some ground and reel.  Then he dives, the drag on my reel gives a little and my pole flexes a lot.  It holds and he is still on there.  The fight continues - pulling and reeling, pulling and reeling. Once I get him out of the rocks into open water, things relax a little.  I slowly work him closer to the surface.  The water is fairly clear and as he gets closer I can see him.  He is a big one!!!  I've got a lingzilla on the line!

A lingcod has to be at least 22 inches long to keep.  In our world of amateur kayak fishing, any fish over 30 inches that fights and has big teeth is termed a lingzilla.
Lingcod have sharp teeth.
I call my friend over to be ready to help.  For us fishing for rock fish is like rock gardening - a team sport.  We usually fish close to the rocks and have the skill and comfort to be there; however, it is nice to have a teammate there to help out if needed.  Today, the drift is into the rocks.  As I am battling my fish, I am getting pushed closer into the rocks which have waves washing into and over them.  With our rock gardening experience, we are quite comfortable being close to rocks with breaking waves.  Getting washed into the rocks with a fish on the line is a bit harrowing.

With my friend handy to keep me off the rocks, the moment of truth is here.  Can I get him into my net?  When fishing for lingcod, keeping them from escaping into the rocks is the first battle.  The next is netting them.  As soon as you pull them above the surface of the water, they fight like crazy.  When we first started kayak fishing for lingcod, we lost quite a few.  I slow down and keep him just below the surface as I ready my net.  I rehearse the timing and sequence in my mind.  And here we go!

As he breaks the surface, he thrashes about like mad.  He is really heavy.  I bumble a bit with the net and lower him back into the water to reset.  I take a deep breath to try to quiet the pounding of my heart and to reset my nerves and coordinate the catch.  Somehow I manage to land him in my net and get my fish grips on him.  Once I have him on my fish grips, I know that I have him and can go through my process of getting him on my stringer.

After I have my fish in the water on a stringer, I get ready to start fishing again  Then the call of "SEA LION" comes.  Sea lions are notorious for stealing fish off the line.  I struggle to get my fish out of the water and onto my deck.  With fish pulled in, we watch for the sea lion.  We have our paddles ready if he comes too close.  Fortunately he moves on, and we get to continue fishing.
Team Liquid Fusion hauling in the catch of the day.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
Before too long, we are catching fish again.  The bite isn't hot but we are catching fish.  Several are small so we quickly pull them in and set them free  Eventually I catch another legal lingcod, my friend gets 2 and Jeff gets one.  It is time to head in and prepare for the cleanup.
Jeff prepares to throw this small lingcod back.
We have plenty of fish for dinner, the freezer, and to share.
Gail and Cate bringing home dinner.  
For the records my lingzilla of the day was 33 inches and gave over 10 pounds of meat.  Definitely not the largest ling out there but a pretty nice catch.

by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at May 26, 2017 11:02 am

Paddle Making (and other canoe stuff)
Functional paddle art and other canoe related ramblings

May Long Weekend Canoe Trip

Got to spend the May Long Weekend on the first overnight trip of 2017. One of my son's classmates has an experienced, canoe-tripping dad and we were graciously invited to join them on Big East Lake. In fact, at one point in the planning we had a total of 4 dads and 9 kids committed to going. The other two families had never been canoe camping before so our host rationally decided to choose a site relatively close to the access point in case a quick exit was needed.  

Unfortunately, the other two families later backed out so the trip involved a much more manageable group of 2 fathers and 3 children. Being just  a short 1.5 km or so from the safety of the parking lot with a mere 175m carry to the lake meant we could bring more luxuries than we normally would take.

Arriving on a sunny Saturday morning, the parking lot was filled to the brim. We ended parking next to a pickup truck where the occupants had brought 10L jugs of water, giant coolers, multiple bags of firewood and even a gas powered electric generator! They were bringing in their supplies by making a trail with ATVs and wreaking havoc to the already muddy 175m trail to the shore. Luckily our booked site was farther down the lake and really only accessible by water. 

My son and I arrived first that morning so we set off to get some camp chores done. Here he is "stabilizing" the canoe for me to enter. 



For this trip, he was using his new 48" sassafras paddle for the first time. He used the lateral grip for comfort as we cruised across to the opposite shore.



Once across the the bay, we entered the narrow part of the lake known as "The Cut". High slopes on either side make this area a bit more protected from the wind. Our campsite was near the end where the channel opens up to the wider part of the lake to south.



We arrived quickly to site 6, a sloping site that climbs up from the rocky shoreline. Gear was quickly unloaded and the site explored. 


Apart from a 2x2 sheet of plywood left by the fire pit, the campsite looked well maintained and clean. Our camp mates arrived and began setting up their gear as well. One of the luxuries included an extra tarp and bug net that was rigged over the thunderbox. Given the amount of rain and bugs we experienced, this setup allowed this special private time to be stress free and comfortable. I'll be spending a few bucks on a similar setup for future trips.



By this point we were surprised at how numerous and active the mosquitoes were this early in the season. My Eureka VCS13 bug shelter had been slung up between some trees close to shore for the view. The kids would later pretty much take over the shelter for the duration of the trip. 



It was also nice to see and learn from other people's methods of camping which tend to be more high tech and modern than my own. Our companions brought along a set of Helinox Zero chairs (which my son loved) as well as the collapsible Helinox Table One - very convenient! I brought along my wanigan for a table, as well as the homemade Basmati Rice Bag chair for a seat. Over the winter, I made a second version of this tensioned chair but never posted it on the site. Version 2.0 is a bit higher off the ground and made with 1x2 poplar for the frame, poplar slats for the seats, some left over canvas strips and paracord for tension. It was stained using an old walnut gel in the basement paint collection. While the kids sought relief from the bugs in the screened shelter, I headed to the shoreline for the view and and the breeze. 



We had a lovely campfire that first night but sitting by the fire meant full on bug jackets...



Morning coffee and a breakfast of pancakes were prepared on the wanigan. I really like having an elevated surface for  food prep instead of laying stuff on the ground. Where appropriate the wanigan will be coming on more trips.



Unfortunately, darker clouds rolled in and  light drizzle began mid morning. This didn't deter the two boys and little sister. I took out the bushcraft camp toys and the trio began taken turns to work on a fallen log with axe, saw and crooked knife. Here are the boys practicing de-limbing and trying to remove some of the bark.



Later, little sister had a turn and did a marvelous job marking off where the adults should cut the trunk for manageable firewood pieces. 





The drizzle unfortunately turned into full-fledged heavy rain that would last until early the next morning so our plans for fishing were skunked. Luckily both dads had brought along additional tarps, so the space in front of our tents was covered. However, the tent pad locations were in such an open space that tie off trees were quite far apart. In the end, we had a tangled jumble of lines everywhere and some saggy tarps but at least we had a comfortable space where everyone remained dry for the rest of the trip.



Luckily the rain let up by the morning of day 3 but all the tarps and flysheets needed to be put away wet. Still, the kids did well during the torrential downpour and when we got back to the parking lot by noon, there were only 3 vehicles left, two of which were ours. Everyone else must have bailed earlier but we and the kids stuck it out.

Once settled for the drive back I asked my son if he had any complaints about the trip. I was thinking he was going to say the rain or the hordes of bugs, but he responded that the trip was too short and he wanted to stay for longer next time!

by Murat (noreply@blogger.com) at May 26, 2017 10:13 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Thu 25/05-2017 Day 62

Pos: 55.2078,-133.0958 Loc: Cayman Point south Acc: tent Dist: 23,9 km Start: 05:50 End: 12:45
One of those nights…as things go on such too pretty to be good gravel tombolos, we misjudged the high tide mark completely. It really looked like two of them, one from the last day’s high tide, one from the last night’s high tide…and tonight’s high tide would have been only 10 cm higher…As usual I am automatically awake an hour before highest tide at night to have a look outside. The water was already covering the tombolo almost completely, and was about a meter from my tent, with a relatively steep gap between my tent and the water. I was camped the lowest on a narrow shoveld platform on the gravel with one tent endeg hanging a bit dowm from it, then came or kayaks behind and on top of a log. Mike’s tent was the highest on the gravel.
I guessed, for me now it is just only about keeping the nerves and to stay put…1.22am would be highest tide. I watched the water slowly raising…and raising…and raising…I better already evacuated my gear in my two gearbags and put it outside on high and dry rocks. I also saw Mike in his tent switching his headlight on, he was also alert. I had my neoprens boots on my bare feet, but was still sitting on my sleeping pad, and my sleeping bag was wrapped around my hips to stay warm. Tiny waves were gently lapping first on my tent edge hanging down from my platform, and I was prepared to lift my tent floor a bit up on the spot were the three zippers meet. The tent floor was supposed to be dry! It was soon slapping friendly outside on my tent wall in the vestibule area, soon the water level was about 20 cm high inside the vestibule area…but I still had about 20cm freebord with my tent floor lifted on the middle side spot! It is all about keeping the nerves! ūüôā
I thought it was a funny game, estimating and resisting the raising water like this. It was working perfect, without I had to move my tent or to pack my sleeping bag away, when I realized at around 1.10 am the water level did not raise any more. It was just a bit chilly eventually on my bare feet inside my neoprene boots, and at some point also a bit bored, but I did not dare to let go of the lifted tent floor to take my neoprene boots off to hide my feet under my butt and sleeping bag. No drips inside the inner tent yet! The waterproof floor and inner tent with the closed fly kept the tiny “surf” out.
Meanwhile, Mike watched our kayaks, as his boat sitting on the log was slowly floating up, mine behind the log was barely starting to move. But he could keep control over both of them them for about an hour, and I tried to joke with him about our situation. But my paddling partner is rather of the grumpy sort when he is getting awake unwanted, and did not take on my happy jokes. Thank goodness, it was a “dry” night, at least from the sky! So instead of keeping on making fun, I was rather first starting to sing and taking some selfies in the darkness, then eventually fishing with the free hand for my e-book and started to read while the water was slapping still high in my vestibule and I had to hold the tent floor still up.
Eventually, at around 2.15 am, I could let go of the tent floor, leveled the gravel underneath again, moved my gear back in and all was back to normal. If my feet would not have been frozen…it took a while to get the sticky salty feet back to heat and myself back to sleep at maybe around 3 am. I guess Mike was already back asleep an hour earlier. A kind of funny night! ūüôā
At least Mike was tough enough to stick to our agreed launching time at 6 am, and was up at 4.15 already to get himself ready in time without me waiting. I barely woke at 5 am, if it would have been for me, we could have slept in a bit…! We were both ready to go even 10 min before six, perfect! Mike was still grumpy about the “miserable” misjudged night, and by no way thought this has been funny! It took me a while to get him smiling again…hey man, it is all about the attitude!
Another half sunny, dry, but head wind day with about 15 knots NW, gusting stronger! Once more hand railing the coast, and fighting hard to cross the small bays. Whales spouting in the distance, many deers today on the beaches, overall not too bad paddling! Quite some gravel beaches lined up, but none of them wide enough to camp on highest tide, and not many of them having a kind of open upland access. We filled up water on a gravel beach, and were estimating the time we need to get to the Tlevak Narrows on the top o Dale Island. Those narrows ebb the max with 14 km/h, and we would arrive just on the maximum ebb of the day around 1.38 pm. No good…and where to camp after the Narrows? We were both tired from the previous night, relaxed on one of the sunny warm gravel beaches, and decided to be rather there on next morning slack tide.
We took the maybe last reasonable gravel beach for camping, tomorrow we would have to paddle just 6 km to be at the narrows at slack tide or just a tad bit later. In the eddy, it should be doable for a while…
We made a nice campfire on the beach, I was once more up for a dip in the Alaskan waters and to get a bit sun on my body. “Alaskan Beach Life” could be worse…!” I made camp safe in the open forest upland, Mike opted strange enough to stay between the logs on the beach…see if he stays dry tonight!

by Freya at May 26, 2017 03:42 am

May 25, 2017

josebelloseakayaking

150.000 visitas

Pues si, este blog ya ha pasado de 150.000 visitas. Aunque los datos num√©ricos en realidad no dicen demasiado. Para mi, el saber que hay muchas personas que se dan una vuelta por aqu√≠ de vez en cuando, si es importante. 

Fundamental en este proyecto es el apoyo de Fun Run y Omei, es un orgullo compartir camino con las personas que est√°n detr√°s de esas siglas.


Este es un blog en primera persona, con contenidos originales y sobre un tema muy minoritario. Por eso y por todo, muchas gracias por estar aquí, por venir de lugares tan alejados y por compartir pensamiento en azul. En un azul de infinitos tonos, del que somos parte. Buena proa...!

by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at May 25, 2017 06:05 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

A Great Way To Get Lost At Riffe Lake

Bushwhacking

Beware of shortcuts and our recent trip to Riffe Lake was a powerful reminder of that cliche. But these little mishaps are what make for great stories. But oh the price we pay sometimes. Riffe Lake Riffe Lake is probably best known for swallowing not one but two communities; Kosmos and Riffe. The lake is […]

The post A Great Way To Get Lost At Riffe Lake appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

by Steve Weileman at May 25, 2017 04:25 pm

Liquid Fusion Kayaking
Cate's blog about the kayak adventures of Liquid Fusion Kayaking in Fort Bragg, on the Mendocino Coast, and beyond.

Eel River Whitewater Class

Its always a treat to get to run the Eel River in May.  With a wet winter and spring, we expected that it would be running still in May and scheduled a whitewater river kayaking class.
Whitewater kayaking class on the Eel River.
We gave first dibs on the class to several of our regular customers and then through word of mouth it filled up and we had a waiting list.

The weekend was spectacular.  We had nice weather and a fun, friendly flow for learning.

Our students built confidence and skills over the 2 day class.
Whitewater kayaking fun on the Eel River.
Several joined us for an optional day 3 of running the river.  This was a great experience for them to practice their skills from the weekend and enjoy another beautiful day on the Eel.
Tunnel 2 rapid on the Eel River.
Jeff and I got to tune up our whitewater river coaching skills.
Jeff Laxier coaching whitewater river kayaking on the Eel River..
A wildlife highlight of the weekend was getting to see lamprey's in the water - both alive and dead.  Pacific lamprey are not technically an eel but are the namesake for the Eel River.
Pacific lamprey die after spawning.
Sadly our season on the Eel is over until next year.  We are planning a variety of whitewater classes for next spring.  Our whitewater fix is not of the salty variety - whitewater of the sea!!!
Whitewater ocean kayaking on the Mendocino Coast





by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at May 25, 2017 09:25 am

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

DJI Spark ‚Äď kompakt flygande kameramackap√§r

DJI är väl den största tillverkaren av kameradrönare skulle jag tro. Nu kommer de med DJI Spark som är riktigt liten och hopfällbar. Känns som en grymt smidig pryl att ha med för att få flygbilder och flygfilmer. Nu är den säkert i minsta laget för en del bruk men funkar säkert alldeles utmärkt för...

Inlägget DJI Spark Рkompakt flygande kameramackapär dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 25, 2017 08:14 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Wed 24/05-2017 Day 61

Pos: 55.0359,-132.9804 Loc: Reef Islands west Acc: tent Dist: 35,1 km Start: 06:35 End: 16:45
It was a strong headwind day, but sunny and dry. No reason to stay in! We crossed over the northern end of the Kaingani Strait in choppy seas, Mike far ahead of me without turning around. Couldn’t say I liked that…but the day was to beautiful in the lee of Dull Island to think of anything else than enjoying. We hand railed the cost with few windy corners, and were curious what to discover. I knea from the satellite images another logging station not far ahea, and we turned into Grace Bay to have a look.
We found not only the high rusty tower which one can see on the sat images, but also a whole floating worker’s accommodation barge from the active logging days. Another more private looking floating house was just moored besides. I heard a generator running, and we soon spotted also a motorboot which made us sure someone would be “home”? Yes, Brian was sitting in his widescreen window living room at his morning coffe, doing some crossword puzzles. He was the caretaker of the whole site, which is not active any more since 3 1/2 years. Since then, he is fully alone with his dog, waiting until the company has sold the accomodation barge and he could move on to a new job. He does not see many boats passing by, and never any kayaker have stopped there, he said.
We had a nice chat from the kayaks, until he asked us in to show us some pictures and old history books and recommendations where to go and to find them in this area. He was quite an interesting character and a worthily source of information. Thanks for the interesting stories, Brian! He had probably spent that hour more words than all the long winter months on his floating house.
He had told us about Rose Inlet, where there was a historic site with an old steam engine. We spent so e time exploring, and found many old rusty engine parts, quite some trash and new construction site stuff. But no people… It was a worthy detour. On our way out, we already had to search for a campsite, as I couldn’t find on the sat images anything mayor. Before entering Rose Inlet, we had passed a dream campsite at N54.94384 W132.90896, but it was really too early to stop at that time! Now we had the choice between a nice beach with rocks upfront, some narrow beaches in the shadow, or a rocky beach an an islet.
until i spotted the white sandy narrow tombolo in the sunshine…the place to go! It was on the ridge so narrow one could barely camp on the sides, as high tide would cover the rest. We checked two other island access, but both would be drying far. This was a perfect landing! We just had both to shovel a leveled bed site for our tents on the highest spot, as spring tide is close. No really inviting upland forest, wide apart old trees, but a lot of low thing bushes. Also quite a bear safe site! Wonderful! I do not have to mention the whale spouting just close…?

by Freya at May 25, 2017 05:22 am

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

I am the new one


1

by Vivien at May 25, 2017 04:01 am

May 24, 2017

NORCAL YAK
Northern California kayaking adventures

Kayaking danger rises with storm-fed rivers

Floodwater rescue drill from Glenn Brank on Vimeo. When it rains it pours, and when it pours, kayakers should think.... ...long and hard before launching into storm-fed water. A few days before...

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by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 24, 2017 10:18 am

Newfoundland Sea Kayaking
"Some things were made for one thing, for me, that one thing is the Sea" Hey Ocean!

Belize Trip - Day #2 Afternoon Visit to Carrie Bow Caye

After spending the morning snorkeling outside the reef, we headed back to Ricks place to grab lunch. It would have been nice and easy to flake out on a hammock for the rest of the day, but you have to take advantage of every minute when you are on a trip like this. We hopped in our boats and made the short hop south to Carrie Bow Caye.


Short hop, 1.66 kms each way
Carrie Bow Caye is in the middle of the picture, off in the distance
 On Carrie Bow Caye sits one of the worlds foremost marine research stations, owned by the Smithsonian Institute. We were told that if no scientists are present, we may be able to visit and get a tour, so we decided to check it out.
As we got closer, a couple who are caretakers of the site approached us by boat to tell us that we couldn't visit the island, but Rob talked them into giving us a little tour, as no scientists were present at the time.



2 families that were anchored nearby on a sailboat were also invited for the tour
The wet lab. The entire building was built to be hurricane proof

Not a bad spot to do some research
The outhouse. What a view when taking care of business! Apparently outhouses like this are no longer allowed to be built on the cayes. When this one is wiped out by a storm, or collapses, they are not allowed to replace it.
Trees are so important here, whenever they see a coconut tree sprouting, the put shells around it to protect it.
After the tour, we headed back to Water Caye, with a stop along the way for some snorkeling


My plan to protect my toes this time, duct tape!
While snorkeling, we had a visit from this huge remora. I didn't know they got that big. This guy was about 3 ft long, and had a hook hanging from his mouth. Looked like somekind of demon fish to me!
Some nice little reefs with lots of fish in between water caye and Carrie Bow Caye, but the current is strong there, so its easy to get drifted off the reef and onto eel grass.
Amazing colours. The pictures just don't do it justice of course


That concludes Day #2 on the cayes. More to come tomorrow hopefully.

by Brian Newhook (noreply@blogger.com) at May 24, 2017 07:45 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Tue 23/05-2017 Day 60

Pos: 54.8975,-132.8053 Loc: Old Logging Camp Acc: tent Dist: 36,6 km Start: 05:45 End: 14:20
A wonderful relaxing quite bear-proof camp site with rain all night. At least I had a nice flat spot with enough headroom again in my tent. Karel’s forecast came in again, with moderate south west first, then stronger to strong north west. At least the rain stopped on packing, but still all gear was soaked. The short crossing over to long island was once more blessed by whale sightings, also later along the western coast of Long Island we had a whale for a long time escorting us, spouting about 20 times quite close besides us,once maybe only 20 m away! Simply wonderful to watch those massive but elegant animals. Before the wind turned to NW, it was calm for an hour or two, but then it started to blow against us quite nasty.
We tried to hug the coast as much as possible, and ran into an wold shipwreck sitting high just upfront a beach on low tide. The search for a campsite was actually not that hard as thought on this coast, manyn narrow gravel beaches which were hard to spot on the sat images offered to land, and some may have had also useful upland sites as none of them would stay dry enough to camp on.
But I had marked an old logging camp on my chart, and we liked to check that one out. Unfortunately, the landing bridge was dismounted, and a rotten float on the backside bay offered at high tide at least an option to land and to store the kayaks, but a tricky upland access. Still, after thinking back and forth, we opted to stay, as the wind meanwhile was blowing nasty whitecaps with well over 20 knots NW. On lower tide, we preferred to unload the kayaks on a rocky beach and to carry them to a low upland site while we were climbing full up to the old houses of the abandoned logging camp. It seems to be not fully abandoned though, as we found some trucks and machines in usable shape in some work shed. There were signs allover warning about no trespassing, and 24hrs camera surveillance. Not sure if those cameras would still be active though… We put up tents close to the huts, and are wondering if the forecast for tomorrow is friendly enough to keep on going…maybe in the lee and shelter on the east coast of Dull Island. There will be three more days of stronger NW headwinds ūüôĀ

by Freya at May 24, 2017 04:53 am

May 23, 2017

PaddlingLight.com
Lightweight canoe and kayak travel

Siskiwit SOF Kayak Stolen!

two kayaks on a beach

In a recent email from Marcelo, who built a Siskiwit SOF back in 2015, he wrote:

My wife stole my Siskiwit! LOL

Hence, I needed to build another kayak for me, I choose a skin-on-frame baidarka. I added a system of bulkheads and dry hatches for camping gear and a rudder/skeg for trim in winds.

Some pics in the Nahuel Huapi Lake:

paddling skin on frame kayaks Siskiwit SOF two skin on frame kayaks on beach two kayaks on a beach two paddlers on the water in kayaks

When I asked if I could share the pictures of his new kayak, he sent along some details of the baidarka build. The construction looks just as good as the construction pictures of his Siskiwit SOF (see Siskiwit SOF Detail Page for a few photos). Here are details:

I did not use any plans. I build it from anthropometric measures from my own body and all the information I got it from the internet. Mr. Brinks¬īs book, Zimmerly¬īs article, Dyson¬īs page, forums, and so on, mixing everything and doing what I thought was right.

I added bulkheads and dry hatches for camping gear, rudder control and deck rigging diverting a little from the original baidarka making it more functional to me.

All the wood I used was recycled from leftovers and scrap, here and there, the same for the greenland paddles. The fabric is not ballistic nylon — we don’t have it here — it is polyester tablecloth. The same I used in Siskiwit, but painted with floor elastomeric latex (cheap but heavy).

spirit line on kayak baidarka bow baidarka construction details baidarka bow details

Hatch details

The post Siskiwit SOF Kayak Stolen! appeared first on PaddlingLight.com. You can leave a comment by clicking here: Siskiwit SOF Kayak Stolen!.

by Bryan Hansel at May 23, 2017 05:11 pm

josebelloseakayaking

Mantenimiento de la orza

Los kayaks de mar pueden llevar tim√≥n u orza retr√°ctil, ya hemos hablado en diferentes ocasiones aqu√≠ de las ventajas e inconvenientes de cada opci√≥n. La elecci√≥n de uno u otros sistema depender√° del tipo de navegaci√≥n que hagamos y consecuentemente del dise√Īo del casco de la embarcaci√≥n.  

Personalmente, salvo en paleos de grandes distancias en aguas abiertas utilizo siempre orza como sistema para asegurar el mantenimiento del rumbo, por su polivalencia.

Una de las ventajas de este sistema respecto al tim√≥n es su simplicidad, pues √ļnicamente cuenta de la propia orza o deriva, que pivotando sobre un eje, sale m√°s o menos del casco manej√°ndose con un mando junto a la ba√Īera, que tienen un corto desplazamiento longitudinal. El mando y la orza son solidarios a trav√©s de un cable de acero. 

Conviene realizar el mantenimiento del conjunto de manera peri√≥dica, o como en este caso, se convierte en imprescindible cuando ya es una reparaci√≥n en s√≠. El problema habitual en esta instalaci√≥n es que la hoja de la orza se atore en su canal con peque√Īas piedras. Esta es la raz√≥n por la que toda orza debe llevar un peque√Īo cabo en su extremo, que nos permita tirar de el para extraerla en caso de bloqueo. Cuando forzamos el mando de manera inadecuada, para sacar la orza estando atorada, podemos incluso doblar el cable. Nos encontramos en esa situaci√≥n, y la soluci√≥n es desmontar el cable y sustituirlo por uno nuevo, adem√°s de limpiar bien el tubo de pl√°stico por donde corre. 

Vamos a trabajar en un sistema de orza Valley tradicional.
Comenzamos liberando el cable del mando, que est√° fijado con un simple tornillo de cabeza allen.
  

Una vez liberado el cable del mando, nos vamos hasta popa y lo extraemos completamente, tirando de el.


Desmontamos el otro extremos de la orza, fijado aqu√≠ tambi√©n por un tornillo.  


Extraemos la orza. Este es el eje sobre el que pivota el elemento. Lo  limpiamos bien, al igual que todo el hueco donde se aloja la propia orza cuando est√° recogida. 

 

Antes de extraer la orza hemos marcado con un rotulador el límite máximo hasta donde sale del casco cuando está trabajando, esto nos servirá luego para ajustar el mando.


Entre el mando y la orza, el cable de 3 mm de acero inoxidable corre por una simple funda de plástico que está fijada al interior en un lateral de la embarcación (atravesando los tabiques de los tambuchos). Para limpiar el tubo de plástico, una buena opción es usar una jeringa con agua dulce.

 

 

Como se ve en las fotos, para introducir el agua a presión, hemos girado el kayak, de manera que el casco esté hacia abajo, y permita salir el agua y la arenilla que arrastre.


Una vez todo bien limpio, introducimos el nuevo cable (que hemos cortado a la medida del anterior), desde el lado del mando. Podemos lubricar con jabón, para que corra suave.

 

El otro extremo lo colocamos en la orza.

 

Atornillamos para fijar, y colocamos la orza en su eje.


Ahora ya solo queda colocar bien el cable en el mando, fijándolo con el tornillo. Para ajustar el movimiento, sacamos la orza hasta la marca del rotulador que hicimos, ponemos el cable tenso y atornillamos con el mando en su posición más atrasada posible (sentido popa), y listo.

 

Si lo hemos hecho bien, al desplazar el mando (ya solidario con el cable) hacia su tope delantero (sentido proa) la orza quedar√° totalmente recogida.

Un par de trucos para evitar problemas futuros:
  • Para mover la orza en tierra utiza solo el mando. Como mucho, se puede extraer la hoja tirando del cabito, pero nunca introducirla empujando la orza directamente con la mano, hay posibilidades de doblar el cable.
  • Cuando endulces la embarcaci√≥n, es bueno limpiar la caja de la orza a chorro, para esto es fundamental que el kayak est√© con el casco hacia abajo. Si introducimos agua en la ranura de la orza estando casco arriba, el agua entrar√° en el tubo junto con la arena que se encuentre en la caja de la orza.
Listo, ahora a disfrutar....

by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at May 23, 2017 05:59 pm

Newfoundland Sea Kayaking
"Some things were made for one thing, for me, that one thing is the Sea" Hey Ocean!

Belize Trip - Day #2 Snorkeling at Water Caye

On day 2, we got up at sunrise to head outside the reef and do some snorkeling. We were told that early morning is the best time, so we followed that advice. After about 10 mins of paddling we were outside the reef and dumped over the sides of our boats. We used a technique call 'drift snorkeling', where you tow your boat behind you by the bowline. Two things to watch out for: getting tangled in your bowline, or someone else's. Also watch for getting too close to the reef and getting pummeled onto the reef by waves.





So much life everywhere you look

Lots of beautiful Coral

Brain Coral

Spotted Eagle Ray


Barracuda

Be careful when walking on the beaches. Lots of stingrays around
My flippers tore the crap out of my toes. Make sure your flippers fit nice and snug, or this could happen to you!


That was how we spent the morning, and that's all I have time to post right now. Lots more to come!ÔĽŅ



by Brian Newhook (noreply@blogger.com) at May 23, 2017 07:57 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Mon 22/05-2017 Day 59

Pos: 54.7854,-132.4996 Loc: Round Islands Acc: tent Dist: 24,3 km Start: 06:35 End: 11:00
The last day staying mostly inside the tent was long, despite continuous rain I was eager to go this morning. But we had some different forecasts. Karel was on a short holiday and was not able to update his strong SE wind forcast from Saturday, Mike heard on the radio something about low winds today but gale warning tonight, and Peter sent us 10 knots south for today. The sea looked all right, wind was lowish, but it was still raining raining, raining…
We had made no clear decision the previous night, just that Mike was to come down to my tent from his campsite far upland to see if I had got an updated fore cast. As he was not coming, and I was not eager to go out of my tent in rain, I simply used my whistle to get him awake…sorry! We agreed to leave as soon as possible, as I was still expecting the wind may be blowing heavy again the afternoon.
The only think blowing heavy just after launching was a wonderful whale, feeding himself quite on the same spot under a swarm of birds, spouting, breaching, diving and showing his fluke, just what a whale has to do to please our eye! The sea had some swell, but all felt good on paddling. Just myself did feel fully wet and cold under my dry suit, as I was getting sweaty helping Mike this morning to get his gear down and was then waiting for about half an hour for him to pack. The launch was a bit critical, as Mike had to push his kayak first time over rocks being flooded with a swell wave, then jump on and paddle quickly off with legs still out. I couldn’t really help him on that…he just made it to stay balanced, not to get too much sideways and to get off the rocks in time, thank goodness, even without scratching his hull as feared. This beach on low tide was rather rocky than covered with easy small cobbles like we landed on mid-tide. But it was quite doable!
So my option on this rainy, but quite calm paddling day with bad visibility was to aim only for Round Islands, where I had spotted a nice tombolo beach on the sat images. The next safe landing option may be another 25 km away if my sat images search was good enough, and I was not sure how the wind would be developing, I really liked to stay on this A-class campsite! It was a wonderful flat dry sheltered upland meadow, with an all-tide sheltered landing beach. Mike was just worried to find a sheltered enough spot to spread his tarp over his tent in rain, and if it would still fly away once the gale wind would come over night? If he comes…so far, the whole afternoon was dead calm but with continuous rain. I was quite happy inside my tent, see what the fore cast tomorrow brings. I hope Karel is back to business with sending me the fore cast! He is doing such a great precise job, and I am really spoiled to be used to *read* it on my sat phone instead to have to listen to the endless VHF radio announcements which are not only hard to hear for a foreign language speaker. Thanks once more very much for your weather updates, Karel!

by Freya at May 23, 2017 02:43 am

May 22, 2017

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

A Cuil view


The cool northwesterly breeze dropped overnight but the sparkling sunshine of the previous day was replaced by an overcast and murky morning.  The long view up Loch Linnhe from our camp with snow capped Ben Nevis looks cold, but in fact it was a reasonably mild morning.






We decided to paddle straight across the loch before any breeze might start up and create the sort of choppy conditions we'd enjoyed the previous evening.  Landfall of the Morvern shore was made near the Glensanda superquarry, which as ever comes a a jarring intrusion into the loch scenery.





A few kilometres further on we stopped to take a walk around Arigh Shamraidh (the summer shieling).  Visible from across the loch as a green patch lined by trees, there are five ruined buildings and a field system here, the ruins probably date to the early 18th century but earlier maps how a permanent settlement of similar size.





Further along again we passed Camasnacroise (Bay of the cross) with its neatly painted white houses and church on the shore of Loch a' Coire. The church-related names include the hill which towers over the shore - Beinn na Cille (hill of the (monks) cell) In 1890 the village is recorded as having a church, school, shop and smiddy.  The village is quite remote by modern standards, and connected by tiny single track roads.





We enjoyed paddling the wild shore north of Camasnacroise, moving slowly and absorbing the atmosphere of the place.  A couple of potential camping spots came and went before we found a place on a level grassy platform above the shore.  The effort of carrying all our stuff up a steep 20 metre slope was rewarded with a view across Loch Linnhe to Cuil, from where we'd set out.

We could easily have crossed back and ended the trip without camping, but elected to spend another night out and have a short paddle the following morning.





We spent a pleasant evening enjoying the views from our camp, though the morning turned out damp with some drizzle and a thick mist.  I took some bearings and set up a route on my GPS as we packed the boats, as well as putting the VHF radios to "scan" in order to pick up any traffic from vessels moving on the loch which we'd not be able to see.




After travelling up the shore a little way we struck out across Loch Linnhe towards Cuil just as the drizzle stopped and the mist began to break into banks of low cloud.  With such damp, low-light conditions and little wind, we were thankful that the midges hadn't got going by this time in April!






All too soon we were back at Cuil in a rapidly improving morning with a fresh breeze dispersing the last of the cloud. 



 Our two night trip had been relatively short in distance at just over 50Km, but had been really relaxing as we'd deliberately kept our plans to the minimum and just gone with the flow.  It had also been a useful shake-out of our kayak camping kit, which had shown up a couple of deficiencies and necessary tweaks before a longer trip.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2017 07:48 pm

Horisont Kajak
Kajak i Stockholms Skärgård

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Vi har fått hem två västar från NRS som vi tror kommer att bli storsäljare. NRS ION och SIREN har låg profil och är superdupersmidiga på kroppen.
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Kom ut och prova. Innan de tar slut.
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by Carin at May 22, 2017 12:11 pm

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

Just wanted to say Hello.


1

by Fidel at May 22, 2017 06:39 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 21/05-2017 Day 58

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent no paddling today
The wind and rain stayed all Sunday as nasty as it was already all Saturday afternoon. I stayed inside my low ceiling tent, reading, sleeping and calling my partner Peter who is now in Sweden. At some point in the morning, I heard something or someone walking on the cobbles – thank goodness it was only Mike on his way to his kayak and not a bear…he really should shout out loud when approaching! I guessed he would stop by my tent on his way back, to say good morning and to thank me for having dragged up both our kayaks higher? But he disappeared silently into the woods again.
A brief spell in the rain made me thinking it is time for a walk, and to find Mike’s secret camp spot for a chat. It took me a while and some scary walks deep into the forest to find his hide, though the light blue tarp should be visible. He had selected a spot between dense low pine trees with somehow open ground where he could easily strap the tarp over his tent. A small fire and his hung food bags protected him from curious animals. Quite cozy actually in here! Maybe I should have joined him to camp inside the woods? Actually, I prefer to watch the ocean as long it is possible, and usually like to keep also an eye on my kayak. We had a brief chat, before it started to rain again and I disappeared once more into my own Hilleberg beach hotel. I hope we can paddle tomorrow, but so far it does not look really great yet…we’ll see!

by Freya at May 22, 2017 02:29 am

Sat 20/05-2017 Day 57

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent Dist: 25,4 km Start: 05:50 End: 11:05
Quite a day! Mike kept the big fire going over night, and no new bear tracks were running around our tent. I woke the man early to give him more than half an hour head start to pack, and actually fell asleep again, thank goodness. We got better in being ready packed together in time, but next day it has to be a full hour. But no worries, I wait for him on shore, and he does wait for me on the water! Well, mostly. ūüôā
We had a beautiful calm morning as the other days, but Karel forecasted stronger southerlies 14-18 knots for the afternoon, still dry. And for Sunday, 20-30 knots SE, with rain. Ok, time to still paddle at least more than half a day!
The wildlife was lush this morning: We started off right after launching with about a dozen whales in various distances, with spouts everywhere and some guys breaching and diving down with displaying their big tail fluke. If that would be not enough, I guessed it it time now again for bears on this big island? Sure! I spotted a black spot on already the next beach a beach, but didn’t think it was one, as it was not moving. Mike was soon recognizing as *really* being a bear, and we paddled quickly up closer to the beach to watch him better digging between the rocks for food. Nice! At some point I started talking to the guy, to make him showing more than his fat behind. He slowly turned around, sniffed into the air, tried to see us, but didn’t really felt threatened and slowly kept on going with his business, and walked upland at some point. Nice pictures!
We paddled around the small headland to the next beach, and spotted him again – or was it another one? And another one? And another one? Thee black bears at one beach! Must have been mom and two youngsters, we assumed. Better stay in the kayak… ūüôā
The next show of wildlife were some single seals in the water, a fat lonely sea lion on a rock, and many many sea otters floating around in the kelp behind the Narrows of Bean Island on their backs with their cute fluffy babys on their bellys. They are so cute!
To top everything off, about thirty eagles at the next headland were soaring in the air. Not bad wildlife day, we just missed the wolves!
There were three corners with tide rips marked on my chart: The south eastern headland of the big Prince of Wales Island at Cape Chacon was dead calm in the morning. we sneaked through the narrows of Bean Island and missed the rips at Nunez Point (if there were some…), but the real nasty looking headland was the area until surf point, with big black rock walls piling up upfront huge mountains. Still quite calm wind, though blowing off the mountains instead of southerlies as it should be. This changed very quickly, once we crossed the first bay which had a small sandy beach. Mike paddled close into it to have a look, I opted to cross in some rather nasty gusts off the mountains. Hmmmmmm…..how would be the next bay? It also should have a beach with landing options according to my satellite image view. Nothing to land really past this one, besides a tombolo on an island in about 20 km…
And now the wind came from SE as forecasted, and quite gusty with well over 20 knots! It was literally taking away from us the decision to land or not – it was high time to go to shore! The beach was at that time of the tide ok to land with kelp in a calmer corner and small cobbles, still Mike was a bit reluctant to damage his boat. Hey man, we didn’t ave any other option and we *need* to go in! Here! Now! I quickly landed first in a narrow rock gap, and helped him to get in. His issue is he feels not able to get his legs in and out of the cockpit in his kayak while the ass is still on the seat and needs the paddle bridge. Not good.
The beach was one of those steep cobble beaches which may get nasty in big seas and strong winds blowing onshore. The seas were low today, it is not spring tide yet, but the wind will pick up and the tide is rising the next days! We carefully selected our camp spots, camping on the beach on one of those cobble ledges should still be ok. Still Mike felt he can’t camp on the beach on the nice clean cobbles with his tent being blown away and leaking in the forecasted rain tomorrow, he wanted to go into the upland woods to find a spot where he could add a tarp to his tent. Well, those spots in the wood were in this *forest* very hard to find and deep inside. I liked to stay on the beach, as my Hilleberg Allak tent is rain- and quite gale proof once secured properly!
I leveled my camp spot, added rocks and logs to my tent pegs, and shoveled cobbles on all sides of the tent. I also dragged my kayak high up, and felt fine with my selection! Mike walked off with his tent utensils into the woods, after he unloaded his kayak and spread all his gear out besides it. Unfortunately I started already to rain and to blow even heavier with gusts up to 30 knots and more, and his gear started to fly around and to get wet. I was a good girl and shoveled everything back into his kayak in the rain, and jumped quickly back into my dry tent shelter!
Mike came running down to the beach as soon he realized in his sheltered forest it is obviously raining and blowing strong now. He dragged up his kayak, and collected his gear he wanted to take to his camp spot. Later, he opted to hang his food into the trees instead of leaving it in the kayak. His food bags are not odor proof as mine are. I had already fell asleep on an afternoon nap! He better approaches my tent spot with calling:”I’m not a bear!” as I was sitting bolt upright wondering who or what may be walking on the cobbles around my tent?
The tide was raising to highest level at 9.20 pm, but already at 7 pm I decided my cobble ledge may not be good enough with the wind blowing the waves up…? Better moving now when there is still time and light than later or tomorrow…? I should have taken the highest and not the nicest spot! I quickly packed my gear back into two bags, one I carried to the new site, the other stayed as weight inside the tent. Who knows about the gusts…
The moving went quick and smooth in rain and strong wind, but I did not need to take my tent down. The new site just had the issue it was so small that the ends of my tent were hanging down, leaving not much headroom. Not great for sitting, but good enough for sleeping! I also dragged both our kayaks up higher, I did not trust the spot!
I just got the fore cast in for Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the calm days are over, Sunday will be off, Monday maybe also if it does not change, Tuesday has north and west winds, hopefully not too strong… paddling life can’t be so easy all the time as it has been the last five days!

by Freya at May 22, 2017 02:18 am

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

I am the new guy


1

by Emil at May 22, 2017 02:17 am

May 21, 2017

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sat 20-2017 Day 57

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent Dist: 25,4 km Start: 05:50 End: 11:05
Quite a day! Mike kept the big fire going over night, and no new bear tracks were running around our tent. I woke the man early to give him more than half an hour head start to pack, and actually fell asleep again, thank goodness. We got better in being ready packed together in time, but next day it has to be a full hour. But no worries, I wait for him on shore, and he does wait for me on the water! Well, mostly. ūüôā
We had a beautiful calm morning as the other days, but Karel fore casted stronger southerlies 14-18 knots for the afternoon, still dry. And for Sunday, 20-30 knots SE, with rain. Ok, time to still paddle at least more than half a day!
The wildlife was lush this morning: We started off right after launching with about a dozen whales in various distances, with spouts everywhere and some guys breaching and diving down with displaying their big tail fluke. If that would be not enough, I guessed it it time now again for bears on this big island? Sure! I spotted a black spot on already the next beach a beach, but didn’t think it was one, as it was not moving. Mike was soon recognizing as *really* being a bear, and we paddled quickly up closer to the beach to watch him better digging between the rocks for food. Nice! At some point I started talking to the guy, to make him showing more than his fat behind. He slowly turned around, sniffed into the air, tried to see us, but didn’t really felt threatened and slowly kept on going with his business, and walked upland at some point. Nice pictures!
We paddled around the small headland to the next beach, and spotted him again – or was it another one? And another one? And another one? Thee black bears at one beach! Must have been mom and two youngsters, we assumed. Better stay in the kayak… ūüôā
The next show of wildlife were some single seals in the water, a fat lonely sea lion on a rock, and many many sea otters floating around in the kelp behind the Narrows of Bean Island on their backs with their cute fluffy babys on their bellys. They are so cute!
To top everything off, about thirty eagles at the next headland were soaring in the air. Not bad wildlife day, we just missed the wolves!
There were three corners with tide rips marked on my chart: The south eastern headland of the big Prince of Wales Island at Cape Chacon was dead calm in the morning. we sneaked through the narrows of Bean Island and missed the rips at Nunez Point (if there were some…), but the real nasty looking headland was the area until surf point, with big black rock walls piling up upfront huge mountains. Still quite calm wind, though blowing off the mountains instead of southerlies as it should be. This changed very quickly, once we crossed the first bay which had a small sandy beach. Mike paddled close into it to have a look, I opted to cross in some rather nasty gusts off the mountains. Hmmmmmm…..how would be the next bay? It also should have a beach with landing options according to my satellite image view. Nothing to land really past this one, besides a tombolo on an island in about 20 km…
And now the wind came from SE as forecasted, and quite gusty with well over 20 knots! It was literally taking away from us the decision to land or not – it was high time to go to shore! The beach was at that time of the tide ok to land with kelp in a calmer corner and small cobbles, still Mike was a bit reluctant to damage his boat. Hey man, we didn’t ave any other option and we *need* to go in! Here! Now! I quickly landed first in a narrow rock gap, and helped him to get in. His issue is he feels not able to get his legs in and out of the cockpit in his kayak while the ass is still on the seat and needs the paddle bridge. Not good.
The beach was one of those steep cobble beaches which may get nasty in big seas and strong winds blowing onshore. The seas were low today, it is not spring tide yet, but the wind will pick up and the tide is rising the next days! We carefully selected our camp spots, camping on the beach on one of those cobble ledges should still be ok. Still Mike felt he can’t camp on the beach on the nice clean cobbles with his tent being blown away and leaking in the forecasted rain tomorrow, he wanted to go into the upland woods to find a spot where he could add a tarp to his tent. Well, those spots in the wood were in this *forest* very hard to find and deep inside. I liked to stay on the beach, as my Hilleberg Allak tent is rain- and quite gale proof once secured properly!
I leveled my camp spot, added rocks and logs to my tent pegs, and shoveled cobbles on all sides of the tent. I also dragged my kayak high up, and felt fine with my selection! Mike walked off with his tent utensils into the woods, after he unloaded his kayak and spread all his gear out besides it. Unfortunately i started already to rain and to blow even heavier with gusts up to 30 knots and more, and his gear started to fly around and to get wet. I was a good girl and shoveled everything back into his kayak in the rain, and jumped quickly back into my dry tent shelter!
Mike came running down to the beach as soon he realized in his sheltered forest it is obviously raining and blowing strong now. He dragged up his kayak, and collected his gear he wanted to take to his camp spot. Later, he opted to hang his food into the trees instead of leaving it in the kayak. His food bags are not odor proof as mine are. I had already fell asleep on an afternoon nap! He better approaches my tent spot with calling:” I’m not a bear!” as I was sitting bolt upright wondering who or what may be walking on the cobbles around my tent?
The tide was raising to highest level at 9.20 pm, but already at 7 pm I decided my cobble ledge may not be good enough with the wind blowing the waves up…? Better moving now when there is still time and light than later or tomorrow…? I should have taken the highest and not the nicest spot! I quickly packed my gear back into two bags, one I carried to the new site, the other stayed as weight inside the tent. Who knows about the gusts…
The moving went quick and smooth in rain and strong wind, but I did not need to take my tent down. The new site just had the issue it was so small that the ends of my tent were hanging down, leaving not much headroom. Not great for sitting, but good enough for sleeping! I also dragged both our kayaks up higher, I did not trust the spot!
I just got the fore cast in for Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the calm days are over, Sunday will be off, Monday maybe also if it does not change, Tuesday has north and west winds, hopefully not too strong… paddling life can’t be so easy all the time as it has been the last five days!

by Freya at May 21, 2017 04:59 am

May 20, 2017

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Goings-on at the club today, plus other people's flowers

Busy day out there - I just ran out to do an apres-heat-wave/pre-vacation check on my garden (everything looks good although I may plant more beets when I get back, I used a pretty old seed pack and not many germinated), but it's great to see things ramping up for the season. Trip leaders were being trained (I would've gone for that if I hadn't had a million things to do before vacation, that's always fun and a brush-up never hurts), there was work being done on the Point Comfort club workboat that is the impressive first endeavor of the Boatbuilding Committee, and the trailer for that boat has arrived, and the Staten Island camping trip folks had launched early in the morning (ok that is also tons of fun so maybe I would've been doing that if I wasn't travelling!). Here are some photos of those (well, except the camping trip people who were probably halfway to Staten Island by the time I was at the club) plus flowers from other people's gardens that I walked by while I was doing my other errands. Iris season!

by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 20, 2017 11:24 pm

SimonWillis.net
Triathlon, cycling, sea kayaking, swimming and life in the Scottish Highlands

Ironman 70.3 Edinburgh Bike Course Recce

All three courses, swim bike and run, on the Edinburgh Ironman 70.3 have changed since the original maps were posted at the launch of this event.  We're told the final routes are in place but no-one can be certain.

I ran the run route (the old run route!) back in January.  The new iteration is not so different as to give me many concerns, but I will walk it before the event.

However, the swim and the bike are on routes mostly new to me, so a recce was always going to be valuable.  I hope you'll find the info useful too.


Arthur's Seat quickly reached
From a Facebook group for competitors I learnt I would not be able to ride the race bike route in two places because

 a) a private road will be used for a short section at 46.2 miles and

b) the end of the bike route at 54miles would mean cycling the wrong way, against the one-way, traffic coming around Arthur's Seat.

That's the big hill in the centre of the city at the base of which the expo, finish and run will take place.

If you wish to ride the bike route in advance - highly recommended -there are two easy diversions for those above problems.  You can read the details on the Facebook group or just download and follow my .GPX or .TCX track.  I went slightly wrong once, clearly visible at 11 miles, but only for 20ft and was quickly back on course.

The overal impression of the route is one through rolling farmland.

It starts flat on the coast and ends in the city, but between the two it's fields fields fields.  There were no long hills to slowly crank up for ages.  There were lots of short, sometimes very steep hills where the route dropped into a stream valley and had to climb out the other side.

Frequent potholes on descents
The road surface is moderately good with sections that are pretty poor.

Quite a few stretches of road are not smooth but chunky, rough tarmac that's very draggy on a bike.

Almost every descent cannot be taken on tri-bars because there's a 'surprise' part way down; a pothole (crater in some cases), a torn section of road surface, a sudden turn in the course or, in one case, a stop sign and major road to cross.

Whenever heading into a tree-covered corridor descent, or one were you can't see the exit, I'm going to play safe.

The 'toughest' bit for me, certainly the most technical, is the loop out of Gifford.  It starts with a  climb and there's lots of the aforementioned hazards right up until you drop back down to Gifford again.  The excellent Lanterne Rouge cafe is well worth a coffee stop if you're doing the recce.

Really?  This is the route?
Riding back into the city you can see the finish from quite a distance, because Arthur's Seat is such a distinctive landmark.

Initially it looks like it'll take ages to reach, but you get to the bottom surprisingly fast.

Curiously, this involved a leg through a housing estate including a pedestrian area with offset railings designed to slow cycles!

Edit: I'm told (via Facebook) that the railings will be removed and ramps put in place to cope with the curbs.

I rode a slow recce on my winter bike and on race day will definitely use a tri bike.  However, I will put on a bigger cassette to help with those short sharp rises.  I did my swim after my ride and it was fine.

The swim and bike routes did feel quite exposed to wind, especially from the North to Easterly quarter.  That would give a choppy swim and a tough initial part to the bike.  That said, since most of the route is in a westerly direction, it will probably even out.

by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 08:28 pm

Virus Affects Endurance Athletes

SLOW
"I have had this conversation with eight of the athletes I coach",  Joe Beer told me.  "It's rife. I've never known anything quite like it".

My local Doctor pretty much confirmed Joe's anecdotal observations.  "We've seen several types of Glandular Fever going around recently", she said, "you might have one of those."

[Edit: I'm delighted to say that as of 13th May I seem to be all clear.  The blood test was negative, my power has returned and the sore throat faded.  Back to training for IM70.3 Staffs and Edinburgh].

Thank goodness for my training diary.  I've been riding less than two hours at a time because of a persistent cough, sore throat and occasional tiredness bordering on lethargy.

I thought had been with me for two weeks.  My diary revealed I'd first commented on it two months ago.  It would go away for a few days, I'd be able to train hard, then it snuck back again.  On-off, in-out, hokey-cokey symptoms.  Add to this some weird joint pains, like incredibly aching thumbs (yes, thumbs!) and I decided to go to our GP.  Bloods were taken and I'll know more next week.

Joe pointed out my symptoms sounded similar to those of Mark Cavendish.  His team doesn't know when he'll be back racing and he might miss this year's Tour de France.

I mention all this, not to bore you with my illness, but because other folk might not realise this is something they can't just 'push through'.

As endurance athletes, we usually manage to put mind over matter.  But if this virus has you in its grip, pushing through might be exactly the worst thing you can try.  With this in mind, I've sought and been granted a deferment for my first race which is scheduled in just two weeks.  That was a 'C' race. The B and A races are looming.

by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 10:27 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 19/05-2017 Day 56

Pos: 54.7523,-132.0083 Loc: Stone Rock Bay Acc: tent Dist: 50,8 km Start: 06:10 End: 15:10 (Alaska Time) It was a perfect forecast for the big crossing day – lowest winds 1-3 knots from all sides until noon, then low headwinds up to 12 knots. I should have just got up when I woke at first daylight at 3.45 am resp. have kicked my paddling partner out of bed then…I gave Mike half an hour head start when I eventually really woke up at 4.45 am, but I still managed to wait 20 min sitting ready to go. No big deal, we just would have to work a bit harder in the sfternoon on our 50 km crossing! I have never had such a smooth water on a big crossing all morning until noon, it was dead calm to oily, with best visibilty from coast to coast. We made great speed, on those conditions our long line kayaks really glide smoothly along, and the weight difference does not play up badly for me that much. Mike has also good endurance and is developing a good technique at speed. He is a nice challenging paddling partner for me! Mike eventually saw the joy of paddling without this stupid harness (PFD…), and joined me on my “topless style” in these conditions with pleasure. Some fat offshore rocks, the West Rocks, showed up to the left, after we had already spotted a bunch of curious sea lions popping up behind us. West Rocks were obviously a home of a large sea lion colony, we ha√©ard them barking and grunting from far distance on these calm seas. What a nature life! Our speed rush got interrupted by a bunch of strong whale blows to the north. Many different guys, one with displaying the beautiful fin on diving. We guessed those must have been three whales! On was spouting quite behind us, and showing a long pretty back line. So nice! They kept on playing and spouting in the distance for a long while. Noah’s Arch was passing by, loaded with four sea gulls. They were quite unshy, and stayed on their big log for a long while. When they flew off, I dropped them a piece of cookie on their floating island. Hope they appreciate it! Last but not least, a swarm of small dolphins kept us entertained. A crossing of it’s finest! Including the headwind for the last three hours with light choppy seas…a bit harder work we could have avoided by getting up earlier. My way point for the sandy beach I saw on the satellite images stayed longtime hidden behind a headland, and we already guessed this must be another, not really inviting beach to the left. But incorrect! We got once more a lovely sheltered, white sandy beach for this night, a perfect finish of a great crossing! It had a nice decorative bear paw track. Mike was not happy to stay, but what were the options? Nothing really! We opted to stay, and took precautions. A carried my spray all the time visiting the river on the neighbor beach for a hair wash and investigating the open upland. Before, I had my dip in the chilly crystal clear Ocean of Alaska. Mike decided to hang his food into a tree, and enjoys to keep a large fire going probably all night. I don’t mind!

by Freya at May 20, 2017 05:19 am

Océanos de Libertad

Comenzamos la temporada de cursos. verano 2017

P1130773
Reembarcar es divertido...pero en situación real si no sabemos, la cara sería otra.

P1130815
La base de Nordeskayak en Limens, es un entorno idóneo.
P1130848
Aprender a desembarcar y colaborar con el grupo.
Se va acercando la temporada fuerte de nuestro deporte, y las temperaturas van siendo nuestras aliadas para la pr√°ctica de los deportes acu√°ticos, si bien el kayak es un deporte que podemos practicar en cualquier √©poca del a√Īo; siempre y cuando estemos correctamente equipados. Si es vuestra primera toma de contacto, no me cansar√© de decir lo mismo; es important√≠simo formarnos. En la pen√≠nsula hay un buen n√ļmero de profesionales que te van a ense√Īar la t√©cnica correcta de paleo, navegaci√≥n  y las maniobras de seguridad, etc...¬°Acude  a ellos!

Estamos preparando nuestra escuela, aquí podéis encontrarnos:
Escuela Kayak de Mar Illas Atl√°nticas.

Club Nordeskayak

Madridsports.eu

Cursos en Limens, Islas Cies, Madrid, Huelva, Asturias, ...y en breve Ald√°n.

WE SPEAK ENGLISH!!

P1140082
Rock gardening
P1140115

P1140141

Una ruta en el mar puede ser como dice mi amigo Miguel, "Un paseo bucólico pastoril" y en cuestión de mínutos convertirse en una pesadilla.
Hoy en d√≠a para muchos la figura de un entrenador personal no es algo extra√Īo, o el aprender a esquiar con un profesor, conseguimos reducir el riesgo de lesiones, y la curva de aprendizaje es m√°s eficaz, efectiva y r√°pida; pues evitamos afianzar errores. .

P1130929
Aurorescates.

Nosotros por nuestra parte estamos ya preparando la temporada de formaci√≥n que m√°s se ajuste a tus necesidades.  Para aquellos que se est√©n planteando realizar alguna ruta por nuestras costas, y no tengan experiencia previa, os recomiendo contrat√©is un guia.  Hay grupos que sin experiencia en kayak deciden realizar una ruta de varios d√≠as. Mi consejo: prepararos f√≠sica, tecnica y mentalmente y a ser posible no vayais sin un gu√≠a.

P1140175

P1140184

P1140189


https://youtu.be/FGDEQsWgOtg
 

by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 03:37 am

May 19, 2017

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

Cuil camping

This the first of two catch-up posts from a camping trip Allan and I made on Loch Linnhe in the second half of April.  The plan was for a relaxed circuit and a couple of nights wild camping; for both of us it was the first overnight trip of the year due to work or health reasons.  A bigger trip was in the planning so this would also be a good shake-out of camping kit.




Our starting point was Cuil Bay on the eastern shore of Loch Linnhe, where a couple of cars can be parked by the side of the minor road above the shore - taking care to leave access for farm vehicles.  Cuil translates as either "wing" or "back", both of which would be good descriptions for the shape of the bay.

The weather looked good with sunshine and cloud dappling the long view down the loch towards the distant Mull hills.






We paddled south down the loch in perfect conditions, enjoying the reflections of the Morvern hills on the mirror calm water.  To our left the main A828 road follows the shore for several kilometres and there was some traffic noise, but this soon fades when the road turns inland a little.






We took luncheon on a tiny pebble beach at the north tip of Shuna (the northerly of two islands with the same name in this area, the other being in the Firth of Lorn).  The sunlight was picking out the colours of the pebbles below the water beautifully - it really was a very relaxing spot.  Looking over the loch to Morvern, I recalled one of our trips from the previous year when we'd paddled around Movern in late summer warmth.  Loch Linnhe seems to be overlooked a bit by sea kayakers, but it does have the potential for good trips.






After paddling around the outside of Shuna, our next stop was at the ferry jetty on Lismore.  There's a toilet and water from a tap at the ferry waiting room here, handy on longer trips.  We now had a decision to make....our plan was very flexible and we'd not planned in any more detail than a starting point and a basic direction down the loch.  From the jetty we could paddle down either side of the island of Lismore (Lios Mor - the big garden, so named for the fertility of the island which is on limestone).





We chose to go down the outside, west, side of the island as it has plenty of interest and a few more camping options.  Within 30 minutes of setting out, a stiff NW'ly breeze blew up and made things quite bouncy - it seemed we'd made the wrong choice!

A considerable chop built up as we passed beneath the ruin of Castle Coeffin.  Built in the 13th century by the MacDougalls of Lorn, the castle passed into ownership of Clan Stewart through marriage and eventually to Clan Campbell.





We were glad of the opportunity to tuck into the bay below the castle for a breather out of the wind.  This bay must have been a factor in the siting of the castle as the MacDougalls were a clan of sea raiders, the beach must have been a perfect base for operating the highland version of a longship - the Birlinn.






The bay also contains the well-preserved remains of a medieval fish trap.  The fish were held back as the tide dropped and could be caught easily in the confines of the trap. 

We considered making our first camp on the cropped turf below the castle, but a reasonably polite notice asks that folk don't camp here as it's close to the croft house and is grazed occasionally by horses.  We had a quick look at the map and decided to backtrack on our route a bit to a spot we'd noticed earlier.






It was a fairly stiff paddle back up against a strengthening wind to reach the spot we had in mind, but it was worthwhile as it was a good place to camp with a little shelter from what had become a cold NW'ly wind - a "Cuil" breeze in fact!





After dinner we managed to find a spot for a campfire below the high water line and enjoyed a dram or two to mark the first kayak camp of the year.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2017 08:10 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

GLID

Inte s√• bra! I stort sett alla skruvar i skrovet √§r i d√•ligt skick. √Ąven hela d√§cket m√•ste bytas d√• det √§r s√• f√∂rsvagat av √•lder och delvis √§r en virket murket. M√•nga delar visade sig sitta l√∂sa eller d√•ligt fast p√•grund de d√•liga skruvarna. Inser att detta kommer att ta tid. 

by Bengt Larsson at May 19, 2017 06:38 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Runt Tjärö med Grimslöv

M√•ndag till tisdag tillbringades runt och p√• Tj√§r√∂ i Blekinge, det var dax att inspirera lite folkh√∂gskoleelever till att bli kajakfr√§lsta. Ja, eller i alla fall tycka att det inte var s√• himla dumt det d√§r med paddling och t√§ltning i sk√§rg√•rd ūüôā Str√•lande solsken, svag vind och 19 grader inledde m√•ndagen. Ov√§ntat och v√§lkommet...

Inlägget Runt Tjärö med Grimslöv dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Pia Sjöstedt at May 19, 2017 08:26 am

NORCAL YAK
Northern California kayaking adventures

Don’t allow a rattle to disrupt your next paddle

Snakes have gotten a bad rap since that incident in Eden... At the aptly-named Rattlesnake Bar near Folsom Lake (2015) ….and there are already a number of rattlesnake bite stories around...

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by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2017 08:09 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Thu 18/05-2017 Day 55

Pos: 54.8669,-131.2680 Loc: Kelp Island Acc: tent Dist: 39,8 km Start: 07:00 End: 14:10 (Canadian Time)
It was a perfect fore cast for crossing 40 km over to Kelp Island! Southern winds 5-15 knots, seas 1 m. Mike was feeling fine with this plan, and I felt confident he would have no problem either. Out of our islands, a school of small dolphins were pleasing our eye for a while. The destination was well visible, though hiding temporary in clouds.
Sure as it goes on bigger crossings, the middle section proves to be the toughest with stronger wind and waves, but nothing to worry about – at least not for me. Mike felt a bit more apprehensive about how much further wind and waves might develop, but I calmed him this would be the “worst” section, it could only get better from nww! He was riding absolutely safely those wind waves from left behind, with the occasional soft break on top. Still, he wished me to be paddling faster and getting across together quicker! ūüôā I was paddling my steady moderate pace, just like a locomotive, not in any way worried about the two of us.
Already in calmer water and wind again getting closer to kelp Island, a whale was spouting not too far in front of us about 6 times, before he was diving down with displaying is pretty tail. Nice!
About 2 km before Kelp Island, our so far nice following current turned around, and we felt it would be better to turn to the right of a small reef upfront Kelp Island. Only one more kilometer against strong current until we could turn into our destination bay for tonight! This was a shallow sandy beach, but black and not too attractive looking. Well, the times of the pretty white beaches might be over for now, one can’t be too picky any more! All good. It was still not spring tide, or we better would not have put up right on the top of the sand. There was one nice tent site also on top of a green meadow, which amazingly was neither wet nor having rocks like those inlet meadows usually all are. But at the beach was right fine now. We just had to do a long carry up te very shallow inlet beach, as we were landing relatively early for the day- But 40 km on on open crossing were enough for now!
The sun came out, and we spent the afternoon beach combing. A mink family was busy running and swimming up and down the beach, really cute! Life could be worse!

by Freya at May 19, 2017 01:24 am

May 18, 2017

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 18th - Cadboro Bay (again) - (#34)

I went for a quick after dinner paddle with Mark and Paul so that Paul could test out different skin-on-frame kayaks. I had to come back early, but he tried out my Cape Falcon  F1 and the Disko bay.
The Disko bay is a pretty kayak! :)
click to enlarge
1 km, YTD 302 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 18, 2017 08:54 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

A Small Peak at the Ghosts of Puget Sound

American Bald Eagle

Puget Sound’s 1,330 miles of shoreline are criss crossed with miles of Interstate Highways, and secondary roads. Within a few hours you can be from one end to the other. That hasn’t always been the case. In fact for the majority of it’s history the waterways were the fastest, most convenient way to transit the […]

The post A Small Peak at the Ghosts of Puget Sound appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

by Steve Weileman at May 18, 2017 05:38 pm