Paddling Planet

July 29, 2017

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 28/07-2017 Day 126

Pos: 58.4544,-152.6873
Loc: Blue Cod Bay Lodge
Acc: tent
Dist: 37,0 km
Start: 4:00 End: 12:35

Eyal and I cleaned our food resources yesterday and discovered some bags of small carrots which where hidden in the hatches and had gone off. What else to do with them than to throw them into the water, far off the tents? Before, Eyal had peeled the skin of a smoked salmon for dinner and also dumped it into the water. Similar, he got rid of a few buns and some old bread. What we did not take into account, was that bread floats and got blown off, carrots and the salmon skin sinks. It has been high tide on dumping…

I was just ready with my clean up, waiting for Eyal to get ready for his planned second swim to take pictures, as he challenged himself to prove to be a hero to jump off the cliffs into the water :-). We were just chatting, when the resident big brown bear appeared in my eye line, the one I was suspecting to have dug in the gravel and weed. Eyal had his back turned to the bear, I just made a face at him and a I was hissing “Let him be!”, as I really wanted to watch the bear instead of chasing him away instantly. I noticed him late, already in the middle of the beach, walking slowly from the bright sunshine into the shade off a cliff, where I had a hard time to spot him any more. He had actually turned his face looking at us while slowly passing, but was not showing any interest, and kept on climbing the cliffs on the far end side of the beach. At some point he showed his silhouette for a while on top of the cliffs, and was gone.

Eyal somehow lost interest in his planned cliff jump stunt on the no-bear side of the beach (whimp, as he was announcing it multiple times for a while!), and we went into our tents early to write and read. At some point I mentioned through the tent walls to Eyal: “It must be lowish tide right now – you know that carrots are not floating?” “Yes, there are carrots allover the beach now, and salmon skin does not float either!” Hmmmm, who is now in charge to clean up the beach, not to present all those goodies too obvious to the big brown bear being potentially around??? None of volunteered, so we went to sleep, at least I did…but I woke up many times by Eyals noisy Neo-air mattress when he was turning around sleepless.

We planned to be on the water at 4 am, to catch the ride through Skiff Passage at high tide at 6.40 am. Means, we got up at 3 am, packed in darkness, and were on the water in darkness, at least for an hour. It was Eyals’s first night paddle…all dead calm, barely current, all easy going. No issues with the paddling , so we needed to make up our own issues…and had some serious argument about – what was it again? I forgot, it can’t have been important. As we were basically arguing ever since and daily about everything, but mostly enjoyed the word fights and the instant smile, both being strong personalities with strong egos and pushing our competitive sides, this one felt awkward to have silence for maybe half an hour. Must have been the over-tiredness… I eventually started to smile at Eyal, how long we planned to be grumpy this morning? It is a waste of precious life time! All good again.

The ride through Skiff passage was pleasant, we just about not got stuck in that lovely forest passage. We saw many deers, but no bears. At the end of the passage, we stopped at the Ranger station to greet two sleepy ranger guys waiting to be flown out after their seven weeks of duty. Nice place!

We were planning to continue to the Blue Cod Bay Lodge, a place Tom Pogson advised us to visit, where Colleen and Jerry were already expecting us. This lodge is really an unique place with character, a secret tip among insiders. Justine Curgenven and Sarah Outen hung out there for three days on their Aleutian trip, and Coleen remembered them dearly. A group of 14 guest just arrived, with six young kids buzzing around with eight adults.

I was asking Eyal in the morning what else he liked to learn from me which I haven’t told him yet, and he opted to go for some rolls in the bay at the lodge. When I was asking him if he would be ready to go or not at all, as otherwise I’d take my dry suit off, he bluffed: “I have a roll, I do not need assistance!” and he’d do only one on each side…ok…if that is worth to get wet? It turned out eventually to be about 20 successful tries, where I eventually as usual was standing in the water while teaching to improve his style, and he turned out to be a well listening student.

I couldn’t resist to also get wet when he was cold, and after a few regular rolls I played around as I am used to, with standing up on feet and head in the floating kayak. Feeling glad I still can do it! At least these were my first rolls on this trip.

We had some great halibut and crab meet dinner, and some nice social time afterwards. Thanks a lot to Colleen and Jerry to host us this afternoon in their lodge are! A great place to check out! Just a pity I was missing by one day the German Yacht from Hamburg “Breakpoint”, but oh well…missing communication!

by Freya at July 29, 2017 06:40 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Bear number 2- black sheep

There’s a bear, JF pointed into the sun in the next valley. I eventually saw the big, squat shape lumbering away from us a few hundred metres distant. But its black, i said. Its definitely a bear, JF reiterated. The binoculars confirmed a blacky brown coloured bear, a massive one, but the low sun and […]

by Justine at July 29, 2017 12:50 am

July 28, 2017

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

En kveldstur til Rotvær

Rotvær er et av de stakkars skjærene i 10 på skjæret som ikke får så mye besøk. Så det har jeg tenkt på å besøke en stund. Nå var jeg på tur til Steigen men hadde ikke padlet i dag - da passet det vel fint med en kjapp tur dit før jeg tok ferga over til andre siden. Jeg hadde tenkt å sette ut fra Bankfjæra nært sentrum, men noen mente det var bedre fra Neshamn. Så jeg satset på den, og det var et greit sted.

Turen gikk dermed forbi det gamle Nes fort, som nå er blitt mer et hytteområde. Ikke så vanlig med slike installasjoner i hytteområder kanskje?

 Det var ganske vindstille, og skikkelig flotte farger.

Nise fikk jeg også se i flere omganger, men dette var det nærmeste jeg kom et bilde av den...

Jeg hadde ikke før tenkt "kanskje jeg bare skulle padle over Vestfjorden istedenfor å ta ferga", så begynte det å komme cruiseskip og en fiskebåt på kryssende kurs... Det var vel like bra, for det meste av bagasjen lå jo i bilen, he he.

Rotvær nærmer seg. Jeg svingte rundt hele, når jeg nå først var her ute. Dessuten sto fyret på holmen lengst bort.

10 på skjæret-dokumentasjon.

Et litt mer fornuftig bilde av turmålet.

Uvisst hva dette har vært, men det var diverse rester her ute såvidt jeg så i farta.

Det var en kjapp tur, for jeg ville gjerne rekke siste ferga over. Jeg skulle nemlig til Steigen og padle med Gunn og Kirsti der dersom det var innen rekkevidde. Ferga ble nådd, og jeg sov i bilen ett eller annet sted jeg har glemt siden jeg var så trøtt...

by Miamaria (noreply@blogger.com) at July 28, 2017 09:01 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

Taking a POS Boat To Chisik Island

pos_boat

Here’s the irony, right before the drama started I had just stated, “Every time I come to Alaska I get pushed out of my comfort zone.” Oh but I should have know better to jinks the trip. It was like spitting into the wind. POS Boat I’m not sure if this is true for everyone, […]

The post Taking a POS Boat To Chisik Island appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

by Steve Weileman at July 28, 2017 04:56 pm

Björn Thomasson Design
<div class="container"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <img class="logo img-responsive" src="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/img/lemoon-logo.png" alt="logo" /> <div class="lang"> <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-GB">English (UK)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-US">English (US)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=sv-SE">Svenska</a> </div> </div> <form name="aspnetForm" method="post" action="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx" id="aspnetForm"> <input type="hidden" name="lemoon.rooturl" id="lemoon.rooturl" value="/" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATE" id="__VIEWSTATE" value="ueMz1SfkeDfF0uDglAKg1IPmRXYzEdltLTioJQPF1bftv7L/MY7vlocYqr0nozgQE7w7s4YEB2Ce4NFr3XpA+yln17xueWGLb7Jxs0SlUaA=" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" id="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" value="1231C1A0" /> <input type="hidden" name="__EVENTVALIDATION" id="__EVENTVALIDATION" value="Ewbv/GCR8dth81dNUTL8ojkaN+/+0aNBXLbUdK8p2Ed/Cunu9KyOHRj8OkN5u7JZSjdgZK/4TJFc+qDo4ZGc5vIr4M6rM/2afoPFPQIDyW1ClzYSQYRzzO8fSlZ5pGOA" /> <fieldset class="form-horizontal"> <legend>Setup Lemoon</legend> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <p class="form-control-static"> Please verify that the following requirements have been met. </p> </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <ul class="list-unstyled checks"> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Can open database connection </li> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Supported version of SQL Server </li> <li class="failed"> <i class="fa fa-ban"></i> Database is not empty <em>An empty database is required for setup to continue.</em> </li> </ul> <a id="ctl00_content_checkButton" class="btn btn-default" href="javascript:WebForm_DoPostBackWithOptions(new WebForm_PostBackOptions(">Check again</a> </div> </div> <div class="buttons form-horizontal"><div class="form-group"><div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> </div></div></div> </fieldset> </form> </div> <div class="alerts"></div>

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

En mästerbyggare visar upp sin senaste: Paul Teather i Ontario, Canada med en nybyggd Nanoq...

"Hello Bjorn,

I have finished the Nanoq build from the plans that  I received from you 2 or 3 months ago. The new owner is physically really large with a 47 shoe size, and wanted me to assure him he would be comfortable in the boat. I raised the front deck around 4 cm at the front of the coaming, and blended it forward on 3 stations. The lines on the kayak appear to be fine, and I did no other alterations to the design. There is carbon fibre on the outer hull and carbon/kevlar on the inner hull, with S-glass on the deck.

Thank you, Paul Teather"

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

Nanoq – Paul Teather

by Björn Thomasson at July 28, 2017 02:00 pm

josebelloseakayaking

Ultima entrega de la costa asturiana

Pues si, con esta entrada terminamos los cuatro capítulos de la costa asturiana.

Los inicios de etapa con buen tiempo te ponen las pilas..


Paleando en mercurio....



La costa oeste asturiana, al igual que la este parece sacada de un reportaje de islas del índico...




 Playas desiertas....




El último cabo, Busto...


Hay que aprovechar que la mar nos da tregua y podemos hacer desembarcos sencillos, en este caso para cambiarle el agua al canario y reponer un poco fuerzas.



Entorno espectacular...


Pueblecitos con encanto...


Las llegadas en puertos también tienen su cosa. Directamente estamos en el centro de la ciudad.



Colores...



Importante salir con los escarpines sin agua...je.!





Entrando en la ria de Eo, se acaba Asturias...


A la izquierda Asturias, a la derecha Galicia.


Contentos.


Muchas gracias a tod@s los que habéis ido siguiendo esta travesía de la costa asturiana, han sido 191millas (354 km) increíbles. Mañana ya toca Galicia...!

by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at July 28, 2017 10:40 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Thu 27/07-2017 Day 125

Pos: 58.6346,-152.3505
Loc: Perevalnie Island
Acc: tent
Dist: 42,9 km
Start: 8:40 End: 15:40

Eyal is sleep talking…I am 100% sure he was yesterday evening calling out loud at 9.30 pm twice:”Hello!”…and then he fell asleep again snoring heavily. Thanks goodness not every night…

We both had heavy “rain” on our tent all night which woke us occasionally – hundreds of sand hoppers popping outside on my inner tent, in Eyal’s tent there were also hundreds inside, according to his stock taking in the morning. A Bear-free island, but not a Hopper-Free Island…

Our decision to launch at 3 hrs after high tide proved to be good while going out of the island area, we flushed out with 13 km/h and more. But actually I had my doubts if it would be good while approaching Shuyak Isalnd…? The tide rips were low and nothing to fear. In the middle, we made moderate speed of 7-8 km/h with the current going almost 90 degrees to our direction, getting pushed out a bit. We already had good view of the Island and also the mainland range at 18 km distance, when the fog closed up completely and we saw literally nothing any more. Thanks goodness to the GPS…

I was already yesterday giving Eyal one of my spare GPS, to get him instructed on how to use it on paddling. He very much appreciated to be able not to only follow my track any more…but accepted that only one person can be setting the course. It is an interesting learning process for everyone to follow the speed and drift off course according to the different currents. In the thick fog, we heard a whale spouting several times…quite eerie!

We were able to follow our line to Perevalnie Island without much dog leg paddling until 4 km before the beach, where the tide rips started. Now the decision to go from mid tide to mid tide proved to be tough, as the rips were more lumpy and maintaining the line was more hard work. Still we made good headway and ok speed for another kilometer, when some very strong current at 3.09 km brought us to almost still stand and confused us for a while in which direction to go, all in thickest fog! It took a while to figure out where to continue, while we got drifted off course and back to 3.21 km. We finally found the right direction after a wide S leg and continued with 3-4 km to cover distance.

At exactly once more 3.09 km we again got cut down to almost zero speed, but this time we decided to power through this nasty bit. Thank goodness I have with Eyal a strong paddler by my side, and not someone who is whining when things get tough! With 1-2 km/h, we finally got free of the nasty bit at 2.97 km, and could continue slow, but steady to reach the beach. But don’t even think we saw any land already…this was the thickest fog I ever had on approaching an island! At only exactly 879 m before the beach, we spotted some rocks of the island!!

We celebrated with “High Five” and “Yahoo, land!” and were quite relieved to not got washed past the island! It was a nice calm gravel beach again, with lot of kelp in the bay. A well deserved swim and some sunshine when it eventually broke through the thick fog rewarded us for the effort of the tough paddle for the last 4 km. Maybe a 2-3 hours later start would have done better…?

I had the impression, the weed on the beach was heavily stirred up by some of the infamous huge Kodiak brown bears…and we picked an area with few weed. See what happens over night…Eyal made a small fire to roast some sausages while I was typing this.
Three more days along Shuyak and Afogneck to reach Kodiak City!

by Freya at July 28, 2017 02:06 am

mark tozer's blog
embracing the elements on the water and in the mountains

NOLS Wilderness Medicine Curriculum eNews for April 2017.




The following e-news announcements was prepared and edited by Tod Schimelpfenig, who is the curriculum director for NOLS Wilderness Medicine in Lander, WY.

Curriculum Content - Hands over the eyes for a pupil response check.

Some of us teach students, in the context of checking pupil response, to have the patient close their eyes, then the rescuer places their hands over the patient’s eyes. This is unnecessary. 

Let’s stop teaching this practice. Simply ask the alert patient to close their eyes for a few seconds.

Curriculum Content - Anaphylaxis

Q - What is up with the sharp increase in anaphylaxis incidents on NOLS Field Courses?

Historically anaphylaxis incidents on NOLS field courses have been rare - six cases between 2005 and 2014. However, in the last year there were 12 incidents. I don’t know what to make of this; isolated spike or trend? Time will tell.

Q - Outside of NOLS, how common is anaphylaxis?

We don’t know. Most wilderness programs don't report or share data, so their experiences remain lore. In the medical literature anaphylaxis frequency numbers vary widely, some suggesting it is common, others rare. I’ve been looking at these numbers trying to find a way to present them to students so they have meaning and can be compared accurately to a useful reference, but alas, I can’t do this.

Q - How often are personal auto-injectors used versus a syringe with vial or ampule system?

At NOLS personal auto-injectors have been used 10 times, syringe and vials have been used 7 times.

Available articles on managing anaphylaxis in the wilderness:

Management of anaphylaxis in an austere or operational environment. Ellis, B.C. and Brown, S. G (2014) J Spec Oper Med. 2014 Winter; 14(4):1-5

Managing anaphylaxis in a jungle environment. Stokes, S. and Hudson, S. (2012) Wilderness Environ Med. 2012 Mar; 23(1):51-5

by Mark Tozer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 28, 2017 01:07 am

NOLS Wilderness Medicine Curriculum eNews for June 2017.

The following e-news announcements was prepared and edited by Tod Schimelpfenig, who is the curriculum director for NOLS Wilderness Medicine in Lander, WY.

Curriculum Content - Tincture of Benzoin

The standard wound care demonstration by NOLS Wilderness Medicine instructors has been to clean the wound, use steri-strips for temporary closure and a transparent dressing supplemented with generous application of Benzoin. This can generate a topical allergic response.


NOLS Wilderness Medicine Curriculum Director, Tod Schimelpfenig, has noted enough of these reactions to announce that instructors should no longer demonstrate the use of benzoin under the transparent dressing. Benzoin will remain in the wound demo kit. It should be shown to students and taught with these curriculum points:

- Benzoin is used to augment tape and dressing adhesives in situations where the adhesive on a tape or dressing is not sticky, where motion (e.g. a dressing over an elbow) or where moisture (e.g. sweaty feet, wet environment) challenges the adhesive’s effectiveness.

- Some people have a topical allergic response to benzoin, or to any tape or dressing adhesive. Assess for this and if it develops, wash the benzoin and adhesive from the skin.

Continue with the standard wound cleaning, closure and dressing demo, without the application of benzoin.

Curriculum Style - Auto Injector Incident

On a recent course, an instructor handed students a set of EpiPen® auto-injector trainers with, “Don’t worry, no needles, no drugs, they’re all trainers.“  He had accumulated these over the years.  As he briefed the scenario a student presented with a confused and mildly anxious look on his face. He held up his “trainer” - a dripping needle protruding from the business end. He had injected himself with a live epinephrine auto-injector. 

The auto-injector expired November, 2007, and the epinephrine was “as amber as a tasty IPA.” Nearly 10 years beyond the expiration date it was still effective, albeit probably not quite as strong. The student is fine. There was mild pain at the injection site which resolved quickly. HR was 80 bpm soon after the injection, a little over 100 bpm during the scenario, and down to 60 bpm several hours later. He was mildly anxious.

The point isn’t that epinephrine is effective long after its expiration date, it is to remind all of us to be careful with needles. We have no idea how this live auto-injector ended up in this personal prop set. This live EpiPen® may have been in the set for a long time, yet never deployed. Take home point - We need to model checking and double checking any medication, real or prop, all the time.

Other stuff

In the current edition of the Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education and Leadership (JOREL) is a paper titled “Evidence-Based Review of Wilderness First Aid Practices.” This is a review of the medical evidence supporting WFA practices. The conclusions are not new; there is very little medical science supporting first aid practices. If you want to read the paper the reference is below. I also posted it on Rendezvous.

Schimelpfenig T, Johnson D, Lipman G, McEvoy D, Bennett B. Evidence-Based Review of Wilderness First Aid Practices. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership. 2017, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 217–239

by Mark Tozer (noreply@blogger.com) at July 28, 2017 01:06 am

July 27, 2017

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Wind stops play

I didn’t even look out of the tent when the alarm went off this morning. I just went straight back to sleep – or tried to through the sounds of the rain pelting and the wind blasting the thin fabric enclosing us. JF did the same without the need to communicate. It was miserable out […]

by Justine at July 27, 2017 11:13 pm

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

Patrouilles conjointes du parc marin du Saguenay–St-Laurent et de Pêches et Océans Canada


by Pêches et Océans Canada at July 27, 2017 09:00 pm

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Wed 26/07-2017 Day 124

Pos: 58.9429,-152.0414
Loc: West Amatuli Island
Acc: tent
Dist: 41,0 km
Start: 9:35 End: 16:30

It was a quiet night with some rain and a lot of fog on one of those “Bear Free Islands(?)”…
We opted to start late, one hour before low tide, and this seemed to be the right decision. We had a great current with us from the start in the eddy. Once we passed through a fleet of ten fishing boats in the morning fog, the main current continued to carry us along with additional 4 km/h. We easily rode up to ten km/h on calm seas with moderate visibility, and the tide rip current areas were barely noticeable with really low lumpy waves. Things could not have gone better – until to the Barren Islands…

The rugged tree-less islands greeted us with a lot of wind, and the current was taking us to another island then we were aiming for. I realized, at some point we slowed down to 3-4 km/h when we continued aiming for East Amatuli Island. When I was correcting the bearing to aim for West Amatuli Island, we speeded uo again to reasonable 6-7 km/h, despite the now strong headwind. We were also at some point kind of out of the wind under a steep rugged cliff, besides the occasionl williwaw whipping us up on some rainy squall. But we made it now easy to the western island’s beach and landed safely on a calm gravel beach. Another “Bear Free Island(?)”…

It was raining, and we dared to cook some simple hot ramen noodle soup inside my tent while trying to figure out tomorrow’s starting hour and pass. It seemed to be even more complicated on this stretch, as the current goes almost 90 degrees to our path. At te end, we decided to conveniently start at 9 am, and to make kind of a zig zack thing – first out with the ebb, then in with the flood. see how it goes then close to Shuyak Island…

by Freya at July 27, 2017 03:37 am

Océanos de Libertad

Seakayaking with Dolphins in Galicia.

del

P1210252
San Martiño Islan in the background.
P1210195
Sunrise on Limens beach.
P1210205
Towing a Xtra Tiderace to Cies Island
Una de las maravillas de navegar en kayak por la ría de Vigo, es que el frecuente el avistamiento de cetáceos.  Unos momentos que son mágicos, en especial cuando navegas en solitario,  respetando la normativa para evitar acosarlos, uno deja su pala sobre la cubierta del kayak, y se dedica de forma exclusiva a contemplar  sus evoluciones en el agua, y escuchar su respiración, el ensimismamiento es tal que el tiempo transcurre sin apenas darte cuenta.  Los diversos avistamientos que he tenido a lo largo de los años, suelen ocurrir o durante las primeras horas de la mañana o al atardecer, y sobra decir que para poder presenciarlos es necesario que las aguas esten lo más tranquilas posibles, puesto que un leve rizamiento producido por el viento, hace casi imposible el poder distinguir entre las olas sus aletas emergiendo.
Estos avistamientos, no pueden asegurarse en las rutas guiadas en kayak desde las Base KDM de AldánBase KDM Islas Cies o Cangas, pero son la guinda en el caso de los grupos más afortunados.


P1210190
Anasacuta and Xtra on Limens Beach

P1210501
Cies Island
Seakayaking is one of the most beatiful sports you can practise! For me is a life style , feeling free in contact with nature...One of the most thrilling things is a encounter with cetaceans...in my personal case I have had several of them, soon in the morning or   later in the afternoon. You must be cautious in order to don´t disturb their way through the water.  In those moments, I like to rest my paddle on my deck and watch them playing and swimming...

We can not guarante you this experience, because they are impredictable and you need flatwater to be able to see them. If you want to try fortune or practise kayaking,  here you have guided tours in a seakayak Base KDM de AldánBase KDM Islas Cies


P1210479
Punta Subrido.


https://youtu.be/V4k7RVbbNsk


by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at July 27, 2017 04:24 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Sun to wind to rain

I was going to be uncomfortably hot in my drysuit this morning. The sun was beating down on a calm day, my watch read 17 degrees C, sheer luxury for the Arctic, and dare I say it, almost too hot for my Kokatat drysuit and onesie. 8 hours later the watch says 5 degrees, it’s […]

by Justine at July 27, 2017 02:12 am

July 26, 2017

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

Frej 534 PRO

Det här är Frej 534 PRO 2017 byggd av Struer boats, ser väldigt välbyggd ut och betydligt robustare än den vanliga Frej 534. Väger dock några kilo mer.

by Bengt Larsson at July 26, 2017 08:55 pm

PaddlingLight.com
Lightweight canoe and kayak travel

Circling Shakespeare on Lake Nipigon

The sunrise lights up our Lake Nipigon campsite near the Virgin Islands.

Within a minute, the mirror-like surface of Lake Nipigon kicked up as northerly 30-knot winds descended on our island campsite. The calm, silent, evening turned into a rumble. It felt like the air above the entire arctic plains spilled down upon the Boreal forests. We shouted over the breaking waves and the rush of the wind through the trees.

“Now!” I heaved the bear bags into the air as Tim ran with the rope. When the slack ran out on the weighty bags the rope stretched and stopped. Then the branch broke sending our supplies to the ground. Trying to race the wind, I threw the rope over the limb of another tree. It held and our four bags slowly twirled high over our heads.

Back at our campsite, waves tumbled up the slope of our 5-foot-wide black-sand beach. The wind was deafening, and we had to yell to each other to be heard. The water from the newly formed waves lapped at the stern of our kayaks, so we pulled the boats from the beach into the dense cedar and birch woods and even then felt it necessary to tie the boats to trees. The mainland was over six miles away, and this late in the fall, we doubted anyone would be on the lake to help us if the wind took our boats.

My tent was the next priority. The marine forecast predicted calm weather, so after we’d landed I’d set my tent up on the beach. Now it was fully exposed to the wind and the stakes were pulling from the sand. The guy lines pulled free, and the tent pole was bending. The rain fly flapped violently. Tim’s tent occupied a small clearing in the woods. We maneuvered mine into the woods, wedged up against Tim’s tent. I drove stakes deep into the sand and tied off guy lines to a few trees.

Tim decided to get out of the wind and retreated to his tent. I stood on the beach, leaning into the wind, and I watched the full moon cast quivering shadows on the wind-whipped trees.

I walked back to Tim’s tent. He seemed slightly unnerved from this sudden change in weather.

“Imagine what it would have been like if we had been on the water,” he said.

Timothy Russell paddles his kayak away from the harbor.Timothy Russell paddles his kayak away from the harbor.

—–

We were out on a week-long trip into the wilderness of one of the last big untouched lakes in the Great Lakes water system, Lake Nipigon. The lake, located north of Lake Superior in western Ontario, spans approximately 65 miles long and 45 miles wide. Its nearly 1,900 square miles of cold clear water is well-known for producing record-breaking Lake Trout. Over 500 islands, ranging from several square miles large to small pine covered bumps, dot its surface. Most kayakers in the Midwest dream of paddling in Lake Superior’s Apostle Islands, but for me, the islands of Lake Nipigon offer a true wilderness experience with more islands than I could explore in my lifetime.

Tim had never taken a sea kayaking trip into true wilderness, let alone Lake Nipigon, a place that sees few kayakers. We set a goal, the motivating factor for me, to circumnavigate Shakespeare Island, an island ragged with coves and headlands and nearly split in two by a long bay over four miles long and scarcely a half mile wide. Several mile-long lakes dot the interior of Shakespeare, and if we had time, we planned to visit Rea Lake. We could kayak up an almost mile long river from Lake Nipigon into Rea Lake. From there, another river connected to Vanooyen Lake, which had its own island – an island on a lake on an island on a lake.

Tim and I had known each other for a couple of years. He had visited a resort where I guided sea kayaking. He decided to take a half-day trip and after completing the trip, he wanted to learn more, so he signed up for a couple of full-day lessons. After the lessons, he was hooked, bought a kayak and started kayaking at destinations around the world.

We had taken a kayaking trip together in Norway, but it was a disappointment in many ways so I wanted to make the Lake Nipigon trip great.  Unfortunately it started with several logistical problems. A friend, who had agreed go with us bailed on us at the last minute, a hurricane forced Tim to flee Houston just before our trip and a mover backed out on bringing Tim’s kayak up to my place on Lake Superior’s north shore. We got Tim a kayak that he’d never paddled before. The hatches leaked and when loaded, no matter the trim, it proved uncontrollable, and it lacked a rudder. I felt grumpy and dreaded a repeat of Norway, and so far, our first three days had been thrown completely off plan by high winds.

On our first day, I had instructed Tim to load his kayak slightly stern heavy to help with tracking in the crosswinds. As we paddled, it became apparent that my choice was the wrong one—once out of the bay and on the lake the waves pushed Tim around, and he couldn’t counteract the turning force. We turned back into the bay and landed at a sand bar.

While Tim repacked his kayak, I walked along the 10-foot-wide, sand beach. Near its end, a dirt shelf separated it from a swampy area. I stepped into the swamp and jumped from one clump of alders to another trying to avoid the water in between. Looking at the dried-up plants on a kayak-sized clump of dirt, I found a batch of late-season blueberries. I filled my hands and brought them back to the beach to show Tim. Soon after, we filled our hats with berries and stuffed the berries into our mouths. They tasted sweet. My hands eventually turned a spotty blue from picking the ripe berries.

We pushed off again to paddle south to Grant Point Harbor and our night’s campsite. Fifteen to twenty-foot cliffs and rocky rubble alternately made up the shoreline. A Boreal forest of birch, white cedar, spruce and pine topped the cliffs. Between cliffs, the forest came down to the shore – the trees seemed to grow straight out of the water. The shoulder-high waves hit the rocks, splashed into the air and turned some of the tree trunks dark with water. Near the cliffs, the waves rebounded and created a jumble of pyramidal waves. Tim’s reloading worked, and he had no problem controlling his kayak.

As we neared Grant Point, a rocky outcropping just before where the map showed the campsite, Tim started stroking harder, and he pulled away from me. It was starting to get dark. The sun was low in the sky and obscured by dense stratocumulus clouds, which made it feel later than it was. Our map showed a campsite in the bay about a tenth of a mile from Grant Point, but we couldn’t find it, so after paddling another 10 minutes, we landed on a 16-foot wide beach at the bay’s back.

A forest fire had burnt through this area. Green white cedar remained along the shore, but the forest behind consisted of white tree trunks with bases blackened and cracked from the fire. It looked like someone had burnt a box of matchsticks and stuck the each stick in the ground top down. A tangled underbrush of alders, birch saplings and a few pines saplings filled the space between the dead trunks.

“I think we should set up on the beach,” I said.

Tim was already ahead of me. He had picked a flat area of sand behind a half-buried log. The log was only a few feet away from where the one-foot swell was washing up the beach. I followed his example and set up my tent behind another log about 50 yards from his. Shortly after setting up our tents, the sun set and changed the sky between the lake and the clouds orange. On the horizon, I watched the Macoun Islands turn into silhouettes. The tops of tall pines stuck out above the dark mass of trees. A mirage made the most distant islands appear as half water and half land.

After dinner, I got into my tent and zipped up my sleeping bag. I listen to the swell roll in; its highest point was four feet away, I hoped the wind wouldn’t blow higher waves or we’d end up wet.

—-

Kayaking down the eastern shoreline of Lake Nipigon Crossing to Lone Island in choppy conditions on Lake Nipigon. Ontario. Timothy Russell paddles past Pipestone Point on Lake Nipigon, ON.

In the morning, I awoke to the clap of waves hitting the log a foot away from my tent. A stiff wind was throwing spray onto my rainfly, which shook with the gusts. During breakfast, we sat in the burnt forest with our backs to the wind. I didn’t talk much, but just thought about the plan for today. We wanted to cross 6 miles to Cedar Island, one of the Macoun Islands, head northwest through the chain to Shakespeare and then paddle to a campsite in the Dockrey Islands near the southwestern corner of Shakespeare.

We paddled out into a sea of whitecaps. As waves passed under, my kayak’s bow broke free and then slammed down into the trough behind. Spray splashed my eyes. When the set waves hit, my bow speared deep into the waves and the foam hit me in the chest. The waves, only three feet high, were shaped like squares. Steep sides, flat top, flat trough.

After 15 minutes, I looked behind us. We were only 100 yards away from Eight Mile Island, an island protecting the bay we camped in.

I shouted, “I think we should turn around.”

Tim cupped his ear and yelled something. I only heard the roaring wind. I pointed back at the island.

Rafted up in the calm water behind the island, Tim said, “I think we should try it again.”

“With that wind, it’ll take all day,” I said. I pointed at the map and drew a new route from our position south along the eastern shoreline to the southern reach of the lake. From there I traced to the west. “We can paddle to entrance to Pijitawabik Bay, cross through The Devil’s Elbow and find a campsite near Pipestone Point.”

We abandon the crossing and started down the shore. The broadside waves washed over my deck, and the wind pushed us towards the shore, so we weaved a zig-zag path south; paddling out as we neared shore and being blown back towards shore. Mid-morning, we landed on a 20-foot wide beach in Lion Bay near a creek that flowed into the southeast corner. A beaver had dammed the creek mouth and created a pond. Barkless, sun bleached and burnt logs floated in the pond. The waves surged up most of the beach.

As the day wore on, the wind calmed and the waves changed from white caps to one-foot swell, so instead of heading south, we crossed into the Virgin Islands, a group of 20 islands in the southeastern corner of the lake. From there, Pipestone Point, a 100-foot cliff with a rubble pile of soft red and white stone at the bottom, rose above the surrounding shoreline. As Tim paddled past, his kayak was dwarfed by the cliff.

After eight hours of paddling,, we made camped on a Canadian Shield granite ledge rock. The granite rose three feet above the water and stretched over 100 yards. While the rock sloped gently into the water, near the forest were several flat areas for tents. Between the two tent sites, a flat area with a pile of rocks would serve as a kitchen. Unlike our last campsite, the forest was green with life. White cedar lined the forest’s edge and 100-foot tall white pines rose above the canopy. The wet, sweet scent of a Boreal forest in fall permeated the air. The sky had cleared to a pale afternoon blue and the only ripples marred the lake’s surface. We enjoyed a clear night to watch the full moon rise over the bay we were in. We topped the night off with hot chocolate and Bailey’s. I wondered what would have happened if we had stayed in last night’s camp until the wind calmed down. I wondered if we would have crossed and stayed on plan.

In the morning, we paddled west along the mainland. The shoreline elevation was low and the white cedar tree dominated the water’s edge. After about two miles, we turned to the north and surfed 1- to 2-foot wind waves for a little over 4 miles to Lone Island, an island in the middle of nowhere. We stopped on the island to eat lunch. Just 30 yards up the rocky beach we watched a bald eagle sitting on a boulder surrounded by water a few feet from shore peck at a fish, pull a string of meat from the fish’s body and then raise its head, opens its yellow hooked beak and swallow the meal. When I got up to grab a water bottle from my kayak, the eagle spread its wings – a wing span as broad as my arms when held out to the side — and flew away. We dined on a lunch of crackers and cheese. Shakespeare Island loomed in the distance. On the 5-mile long south shore, which we could see, white pines rose above white cedar and birch.

After lunch, we surfed wind waves to the Macoun Islands. By dinner, the southerly winds were calm and the lake smooth as glass. That’s when the 30-knot winds from the north hit.

—-

The sunrise lights up our Lake Nipigon campsite near the Virgin Islands. Drying out paddling clothing in the morning sun on Lake Nipigon. A kayak sits in front of a tent at moonrise. Lake Nipigon, Ontario.

The morning after the wind storm, I woke to a gray sky. The wind beat on the side of my tent. It took a half-hour to motivate and put on my wet paddling clothing. We sat on the beach and ate a hardy breakfast of oatmeal, brown sugar and loads of dried fruit. We’d planned to get around Shakespeare in two days, but after our detour to avoid the rough crossing, we were a day and a half behind. Now we faced a hard choice: if we paddled to the northwest corner of Shakespeare, any bad weather would make getting back to shore with enough time to catch Tim’s flight almost impossible. Either we could explore the Macoun, Carson and Asseff islands on eastern side or do the 26-mile circumnavigation in one day. Because I’m goal oriented, I wanted to complete the circumnavigation instead of exploring the islands. Tim reluctantly agreed. It would be his longest paddling day ever. That concerned me, but, as I saw over the past few days, he had come a long way in paddling skills since those first lessons.

We launched off through a set of islands and fog on a compass bearing to Shakespeare just visible as a dark shadow through the haze. I let Tim go out in front. We paddled past Amikwian Island, a domed-shaped island covered with white cedars and pines, and then past a few unnamed islands on our map. The calm water between the islands felt like a treat after the last three rough days. My kayak seemed to glide across the water’s surface and even lazy strokes pushed my kayak forward at almost 4 knots. My arms and shoulders relaxed as the kayak cut through the water with nary a sound.

When we reached Shakespeare, I peered into the forest. Like on the other islands the cedar, birch and pine came down to the shore. Only a few pine saplings filled the underbrush, and the floor was covered in a velvety, green moss. Foot-long masses of the gray-green Old Man’s Beard lichen hung down from the lower dead branch of all the trees. Tim paddled point-to-point, and I hugged the shoreline peering into the dense forest when it opened up trying to spot a bear or woodland caribou, which the area is well known for. I didn’t see any mammals, but bald eagles perched in the high branches of old-growth pine. Every now and then, I’d see Tim stare off towards the shore at something in the woods. He looked like he was enjoying himself.

When we got to Mink Harbor, a protected bay on the southern part of the island, I watched as the wind pushed Tim off-course out into open water towards Eagle Nest Island where on the tops of several 100-foot tall white pines, five bald eagles turned their heads in unison to watch us as we passed by.

We paddled around the southwest corner of Shakespeare to the western shore and a brisk headwind. The water was flat, because we were protected by the Dockrey islands, a set of 20 or so densely forested islands, so despite the wind, paddling was easy. Ahead of us, we could see the elevation rise as a number of hills built towards the north shore. Paupuskeese Mountain, an 1126-foot tall, oblong hill at the end of a peninsula, dominated the horizon.

At lunch, we found a hunting camp and explored it. A canvas tent’s wood frame and a number of plastic containers stashed under a surprisingly intact blue tarp hid back in the woods. After exploring the camp and wondering about who built it—poachers, researchers or hunters—we continued up the shore past 10 to 20-foot, dark gray cliffs, black sand beaches and even a crumbly sea stack. Then we stopped on Luck Island, which should have been our campsite last night. It was completely denuded of trees from a fire and had a long flat beach for camping. With the right weather, camping here would still give us just enough time to make Tim’s flight.

I asked Tim, “How are you doing?”

He said, “I feel like I can paddle the rest of the afternoon.”

We were less than 4 miles away from King’s Head, a 300-foot tall granite cliff rising directly out of the water, and then another 7 miles from our campsite. The map showed about a mile of cliffs to paddle past until we reached King’s Head. I clicked on the weather radio, and it crackled back that we would face southerly gales the next day, but a calm afternoon. We could camp here or continue on without worrying about getting wind bound on the north side of the island.  The sun was still high in the sky, and the wind felt gentle when it blew across my skin. We decided to go for it.

We paddled past the opening of McRitchie Shortcut, the bay that almost cuts the island into two; its banks where covered with granite shelves, boulders and a thick Boreal forest that came to water’s edge. It looked like river cut through the island. We rounded the point on the northeast corner of the shortcut and saw the cliffs of King’s Head. The vertical to overhanging, bleached-white palisades dropped 300-feet directly into Nipigon’s clear waters. Cracks ranging in size from fist wide to body wide ran from the water to the top. Along the cracks, green and orange lichen covered the wall. Ledges near the top supported small aspen and white cedar. Without the wind, the waves were 2 to 3-foot swells instead of whitecaps. Even away from the cliffs, the reflecting waves created a chaotic maze of peaks and valleys to our shoulders or slightly overhead. I had to brace against a wave face now and then to avoid being pushed over. My eyes followed the cracks up the gray-white walls, and I imagined climbing to the top and looking out across all of the northern section of Lake Nipigon, over the 100s of islands covered in cedar, birch and pine. I imagined being able to see the north shore almost 40 miles away, and the forest beyond that stretching as far north as I could see. We bobbed up and down in the waves in complete silence while looking at the cliffs.

By the time we rounded King’s Head, the sun was hugging the horizon. We wouldn’t finish the 7-mile paddle back to our campsite, so we paddled to where the map showed an established campsite. It wasn’t there so we split up. Tim went clockwise around the island and I went counterclockwise. Eventually, we found a five-foot wide sand beach just big enough to pull up our two kayaks and a grassy campsite.. We watched the sun set behind two old-growth white pines on Shakespeare Island as the sky turned orange-yellow.

After the sun disappeared, I found myself pulling on all my dry clothing and shivered as I cooked dinner despite huddling close to the fire.I pulleda bothy bag around my shoulders as a cloak, but my teeth still chattered. That night cold air seeped into my sleeping bag, and despite curling up in a tight ball, I still rolled from side to side all night trying to warm one side against the ground and then the other.

I awoke early to the sound of wind shaking my tent. Tim wanted to get the crossing from Cedar Island back to Grand Point Harbor out of the way today to be sure he wouldn’t miss his flight. The marine forecast was predicting two days of gales from the south, which would make our emergency escape route a brutal into-the-wind paddle if we couldn’t make the crossing. Judging from our aborted crossing, I doubted that we could escape with gales.

We worked our way south towards Cedar Island staying in the wind shadows on the northern sides of the islands as much as possible. Once into the open water between the Asseff Islands, which we had camped on, and the Macoun Islands, the wind blew spray off the top of the ripples. It took almost an hour to paddle the mile and a half between the island chains. By the time we reached the campsite we stayed in before heading around Shakespeare, my arms hurt from fighting the wind. Without saying anything, Tim landed on the black sand beach. We finished our official circumnavigation, but felt defeated by the wind. I decided to check out the south side of the island and the open water to see how bad it was. Once there, I got out into whitecaping 4-foot waves with periods of five or six seconds. The spray coming off the tops and the water washing over my deck soaked my clothes completely. I paddled past the end of the island and surfed a few waves up the channel on the east side of the island before heading back to camp. The prospects of making Tim’s flight dimmed.

We set up our tents almost wall to wall in the small opening in the cedars. I erected a tarp in the remaining space. Tim gathered firewood. I sat under the tarp and listened to the waves, which sounded like thunder against the backside of the island, and I watched the 100-foot tall white pines whip back and forth in the wind. There was a loud snap down island. It sounded like a tree breaking in two. Tim continued to bring piles of firewood.

Soon rain started to fall in sheets, the wind drove the sheets across the wind-whipped water in front of the campsite, then thunder and lightning erupted all around us. From the dry space under the tarp, we listened to thunder and watched the flashes of lightning. Tim dug a pit in the sand, piled a bunch of sand behind the pit to reflect heat into the tarp and used birch bark, the most flammable bark in a Boreal forest, to start a fire. We sat under the tarp and watched the day turn to night.

Warming his hands over a small fire. Macoun Island, Lake Nipigon, ON.

I got up in the morning and made fry bread with cinnamon, sugar and loads of butter while watching the trees continue to sway. The storm felt like it was blowing itself out. After breakfast, I walked 100 yards through pines, birch and cedar to the island’s east side. There I watched waves splash against granite ledges on the next island over. They looked smaller than yesterday. I turned south towards the island’s end. The ground changed from a dense forest to one log piled over another. The bark on most was falling off and moss grew on the tops of the logs lowest on the piles. I slid across the tops of some, carefully planted my feet on the ground on the other side. When a log pointed south towards the island’s end, I balanced along its top. After a third of a mile I reached the granite tip of the island, I had a view of the open water to the south. The whitecaps were few and the waves were about 2-feet tall. When I got back to camp, I sat down on the black sand and looked out at the islands.

By noon, the blue sky appeared above our campsite, the tops of trees stops moving, and it felt like a good time to head to shore. We paddled to the Cedar Island. Once there, I glanced back at Shakespeare. To the north King’s Head rose above its shore and all the islands we had paddled through. To the south, 100-foot white pines dwarfed the birch and cedar below.

“Look at that, Tim,” I said and motioned with my chin towards Shakespeare. “We just came around it.”

He shook his head yes, and we set a course to High Hill Harbor and paddled home.


Note: This is from a trip I took in 2008. This story was never published. A version appeared in the now-defunct Superior Outdoors Magazine.

 

The post Circling Shakespeare on Lake Nipigon appeared first on PaddlingLight.com. You can leave a comment by clicking here: Circling Shakespeare on Lake Nipigon.

by Bryan Hansel at July 26, 2017 07:10 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Skäldervikstisdagskväll

Igår tog jag en runda på Skälderviken. Lite grått ger lite mindre folk än för en vecka sen 🙂 En säl spanade in mig, och jag den, strax utanför Skepparkroken.

Inlägget Skäldervikstisdagskväll dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at July 26, 2017 07:36 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Wanted: Paddling partner from Seattle going south in August!

Hi to all!

I found the last weeks I am feeling comfortable to have a paddling partner all the time with me. I will finish my first leg going north around North America probably on July 30th in Kodiak, and like to spend my remaining time until August 31st paddling from Seattle going south.
Is there anyone keen to join me on this section, or on parts of it? I may start from Seattle around 4th or 5th of August, and see how far I may get until I have to catch my flight back August 31st.
If you are interested to paddle with me so short term, please respond with a short e-mail to freya@gmn-usa.com. Will be nice to hear from you!

by Freya at July 26, 2017 02:09 am

Transporting two kayaks from Portland to Seattle

Hi to all,
is there by chance anyone driving the next days from Portland/ Oregon to Seattle, and could transport my two kayaks from Alder Creek Canoe and Kayak to Chris Cunningham in Seattle? I like to paddle south for the remaining weeks until August 31st, and will already finish my northern leg in Kodiak probably July 30th.
Thanks for checking! Please respond to freya@gmn-usa.com

by Freya at July 26, 2017 02:03 am

Tue 25/07-2017 Day 123

Pos: 59.1460,-151.5104
Loc: East Chugach Island spit
Acc: tent
Dist: 48,6 km
Start: 6:55 End: 14:45

The river we are camped at looks quite different on low tide, it is actually just a tiny creek, which gets blocked by the rising tide to a wide pool, where we were yesterday enjoying our icy swim. I forgot yesterday to mention the black bear on the other side passing by at some point…it was just another bear… 🙂

Today’s paddle was directed by the current which develops really strong behind Gore Point, and we were far offshore most time. The first three hours, we were riding a 3 km/h eddy to the point, the rips were quite flat at slack tide. Behind the point, it took an hour to get some good current again, when we aimed directly to East Chugach Island. All on calm flat water, and with an additional push of 2-4 km/h. A pleasant speed! No rough tidal rips to be seen, but close to the island we still found strong current. I took precautions, and aimed all the crossing to the southern tip, while we planned to land on the north western spit. Out came quite a perfect straight crossing line, even in foggy cloudy conditions. Thank goodness to a GPS!

Our beach camp at the sandy spit is on those juicy well scented plants, a nice soft bed! The fore cast until next Tuesday is all days variable 10 knots wind and low seas…God is blessing us! We will cross tomorrow to East Amatuli Island, and next day to Shuyak Island. Probably another three days will take us to Kodiak City, arriving probably Sunday 30th.

I am well in time for my flight back home from Seattle end of August, but it is way too early to already finish my first paddling block in Kodiak City! I was thinking of either rounding Kodiak Island, or continuing along towards the Aleutian Islands. But for both ideas I really like to have again a good skill full paddling partner with good photography and video for this stunning section (and to be eaten first by the brown bears…). Getting back from the Aleutians in time might be also more tricky.

As no paddling partner for those sections is really handy so short term, I am opting for a third solution to spend the rest of my remaining time reasonable: I will fly from Kodiak via Anchorage to Seattle and start on my southern leg of my circumnavigation of North America, as far as I am getting until end of August. This requires some logistics I will have to do now, but it should be possible. And finding paddling partners for this easier accessible area may work out even short term. Any volunteers???

by Freya at July 26, 2017 12:57 am

Océanos de Libertad

Sea Kayaking Cies Island

P1210222
Valley Anasacuta and Tiderace Xtra resting on the beach.

P1210227

P1210240
Rodas Beach
P1210666
Crossing to San Martiño.
P1210228
The view from our base.
P1210232
Our office door.
Hi, I´m going to present you our Sea Kayak base located in Cies Island. in 2007 "The Guardian" newspaper chose Islas Cies, Galicia - Spain as the top 1 beach in the world. The Guardian article . If you are planning to visit the north of Spain like for  example Santiago de Compostela, Pontevedra, etc I recommend you reserve a couple of days for visiting Islas Cies. There you have the posibilitty to book in the campsite.
If you like snorkeling or seakayaking you may contact Base KDM Cies for a guided tour with one of the best Sea kayak Guide of Spain and firts quality equipment. You will enjoy the beatifull landscapes, and crystalline waters. After kayaking you can walk arround the paths of the  island or have a sunbath on the white sand of Rodas beach.
By the way! Cies Island is a National Park so you can make an idea of the gorgeous place you are visitting!

P1210248

Our base is part of a governmental project that involves The Galician Canoe Federation FEGAPI and the Galician goverment http://deporte.xunta.gal/ so you can be sure that you are in good hands!


P1210220

P1210624

P1210243


Os presento nuestra base de kayak de mar en las Islas Cies. Para quién no conozca las islas, deciros que es como estar en el caribe, pero más cerquita...Podéis alojaros en el camping de la isla y relizar numerosas actividades, como senderismo, snorkel, y kayak de mar... Si estáis interesados en el kayak de mar, os ofrecemos rutas guiadas con uno de los mejores profesores de este país Base KDM Cies. Son rutas desarrolladas para cualquier persona, en kayaks estables y seguros y navegareis en aguas protegidas, Nuestro objetivo por encima de todo es vuestra seguridad y disfrute, por lo que personalmente os lo recomiendo pese a que no tengais experiencia previa. Además ireis equipados con material de primera calidad. Base KDM


P1210626
Our base in the campsite.
A lo largo de la costa gallega la Federación Gallega de Piragüismo junto con la Dirección General de Deportes de la Xunta de Galicia, han creado unas bases de kayak de mar para promocionar esta modalidad deportiva, todo ello cumpliendo unos exigentes requisitos, la base de las Islas Cies fue la pionera.
Simplemente os animo a experimentar y sentir la navegación libre en un kayak de mar.

P1210671

P1210640
Clear waters.
  P1210609

by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at July 26, 2017 01:33 am

July 25, 2017

Björn Thomasson Design
<div class="container"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <img class="logo img-responsive" src="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/img/lemoon-logo.png" alt="logo" /> <div class="lang"> <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-GB">English (UK)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-US">English (US)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=sv-SE">Svenska</a> </div> </div> <form name="aspnetForm" method="post" action="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx" id="aspnetForm"> <input type="hidden" name="lemoon.rooturl" id="lemoon.rooturl" value="/" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATE" id="__VIEWSTATE" value="ueMz1SfkeDfF0uDglAKg1IPmRXYzEdltLTioJQPF1bftv7L/MY7vlocYqr0nozgQE7w7s4YEB2Ce4NFr3XpA+yln17xueWGLb7Jxs0SlUaA=" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" id="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" value="1231C1A0" /> <input type="hidden" name="__EVENTVALIDATION" id="__EVENTVALIDATION" value="Ewbv/GCR8dth81dNUTL8ojkaN+/+0aNBXLbUdK8p2Ed/Cunu9KyOHRj8OkN5u7JZSjdgZK/4TJFc+qDo4ZGc5vIr4M6rM/2afoPFPQIDyW1ClzYSQYRzzO8fSlZ5pGOA" /> <fieldset class="form-horizontal"> <legend>Setup Lemoon</legend> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <p class="form-control-static"> Please verify that the following requirements have been met. </p> </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <ul class="list-unstyled checks"> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Can open database connection </li> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Supported version of SQL Server </li> <li class="failed"> <i class="fa fa-ban"></i> Database is not empty <em>An empty database is required for setup to continue.</em> </li> </ul> <a id="ctl00_content_checkButton" class="btn btn-default" href="javascript:WebForm_DoPostBackWithOptions(new WebForm_PostBackOptions(">Check again</a> </div> </div> <div class="buttons form-horizontal"><div class="form-group"><div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> </div></div></div> </fieldset> </form> </div> <div class="alerts"></div>

Frej – Alf Skaug

Frej – Alf Skaug

En ny välbyggd och vacker Frej i Norge – en som kommer att ställas ut på träbåtsfestivalen i RISØR

"Hei Bjørn.

Ja nu flyter en ny “FREJ” sjøsatt i Oslo 28 Juni 2017. Navnet er “ALFI”. Jeg syes den er vakker, i Canadisk Cedar, Mahogny og Ask, og fungrer fint. Håper du tilgir små ting som ror istedenfor skadda, og ikke nedsenket karm. Om jeg skulle ha en kommentar etter noen turer på fjorden i Oslo, merker jeg at forskipet slår noe i krapp sjø, men jeg tror jeg må lære meg å bevege min vekt mot bølgene. 

Jeg takker for dine svar på mine spørsmål under byggingen. 6 lag med 2-komponent UV-lakk gikk fint som sluttfinish. Noen utmaninger har det vært, og det er nok ingen nakdel at jeg er utbildat møbelsnekker. Jeg har fått mye beundring fra bekjente. Jeg forsterket akterdekk ekstra. Det ble mye epoxy og lakk, så vekten ble ca 20 kg. Dimensjoner forøvrig er i samsvar med original tegning.

Så kommer det som muligens vil glede dit hjerte. Vi har i byen RISØR, ca. 24 mil sørvest fra Oslo, en “TREBÅTFESTIVAL” hvert år. For 2017 avholdes denne 3-5 August. Min “FREJ” er blitt antatt, og blir presentert på torget i RISØR. Konstruktør og snekker blir presentert, og jeg vil være tilstede for spørsmål. Håper jeg ikke skjemmer ut deg. Har du noen kommentarer, eller annet å bidra med i anledningen, så la meg høre fra deg.

Ønsker deg en fortsatt fin sommer.
Mange hisen fra Alf."

Frej – Alf Skaug

Frej – Alf Skaug

by Björn Thomasson at July 25, 2017 10:41 am

Paddle Making (and other canoe stuff)
Functional paddle art and other canoe related ramblings

Homemade Portage Pads

My 14 foot Chestnut / Peterborough has a basic centre thwart instead of a carved yoke which makes for some rather uncomfortable portaging. I've dabbled with some traditional paddle yoke methods (described in this post here) but found that with my habit of taking two very different blade designs when out, the resulting yoke would always be uncomfortable on one side.

While not too commonly used here in Ontario, clamp on portage  pads seem to be quite popular in the Boundary Waters region. I picked up a pair of Stewart River pads back in 2011 and they have been used on the 15' Langford with modest success.

Stewart River pads 

I like repurposing whenever possible and the opportunity came up to make use of some free discarded stuff. During an end-of-season shoreline cleanup on the cottage lake last fall, I came across a barely used kid-sized, keyhole style lifejacket tangled in some reeds. There was no name on it and a listing on the lake association's lost and found page has turned up no claimants.


The foam inserts seemed perfect for this project so it was cut up and the innards removed. The orange nylon will be re-purposed into some rope bags or sacks for tent pegs.  

Anyway, I searched online for a tutorial on making pads and came across this very descriptive writeup here. Many thanks to the author for outlining the necessary hardware. In my case for the wooden base, I used pine cutoffs from the recently completed plank seat experiment. These were originally slats from an IKEA bed that someone discarded on garbage day.

Discarded Ikea bed slats

I basically followed the tutorials instructions but used 2 1/2" carriage bolts simply because I had them. For the metal bar, I used a 4" straight steel brace commonly used in shelving. The holes in the brace are offset which explains why the carriage bolts don't look aligned. Here is a picture of the wood bases (3.5" wide by 8" long) along with the foam from the lifejacket.



The foam was easily trimmed to shape but before wrapping in canvas, I wanted to test how many layers would be suitable for the pads in order to be comfortable but also reduce the bulk. The Stewart River pads are 4" thick. After temporarily wrapping the wooden bases with foam and rubber bands, I attached them to the canoe for a test run.

 Testing out the foam

After tinkering by removing or adding foam layers, I settled on 5 pieces per pad which worked out to about 2 1/4" of padding. With the 3/4" wooden base that worked out to  3" overall height for the pads.

The wooden base was laid down onto some brown  material (left over from a weather treated canvas tarp). Here you can see that the metal support bar was also wrapped in black duct tape to avoid scratching the wooden thwart when attached.


I differed from the original tutorial in the fold up technique to minimize the folding. Started by stapling the top and the bottom.




Then the edges were tightly brought in and stapled for a more square effect.


Here's a final pic of the underside. Certainly not professional but good enough for the job, especially for an area that won't be that visible in the end.


Attached to the centre thwart, the pads should make this relatively heavy 14 footer a bit easier to manage



by Murat (noreply@blogger.com) at July 25, 2017 10:22 am

Pouls kajakblog
Jeg hedder Poul, og jeg er kajakoholiker! Denne blog - der mest er min egen dagbog over mit "kajakliv" - handler om mine kajakture og det udstyr jeg benytter mig af.

Begyndertur til Karrebæksminde

Susanne havde inviteret til begyndertur til Karrebæksminde.
Vi var i alt 6 roere, der tog af sted.
Vejret var fint og vi lå hurtigt i kanalen foran Græshoppebroen.
Her var ikke meget strøm og Susanne inviterede alle til en tur under broen.
Efter brounderroningen roede vi om til den lille strand ved DUI hytten og gik i land - og så stod den på is eller kaffe inden vi roede hjem igen

Fin, hyggelig tur på 16 km med et par af de nye NKC'ere.

by Pouls kajakblog (noreply@blogger.com) at July 25, 2017 09:00 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 23/07-2017 Day 121

Pos: 59.5740,-150.5058
Loc: Ariadne Cove
Acc: tent
Dist: 46,1 km
Start: 6:55 End: 19:20

Our bear from the landing last evening did not show up any more. He seemed to have well eaten digging in the sea weed, and I think he thought what I was thinking – there is space for all three of us on the beach!

We guessed it would be again a sunny day, but as soon as we reached after a short crossing aptly named Cloudy Cape, low hanging clouds were covering all mountain peaks around. No big deal, I actually rather not paddle in bright sunlight. Cloudy Cape offered two wonderful big caves, the left wide big one was a real “training cave” for Caven Men to be, and I offered Eyal to have a go. He agreed, but paddled hectically in over the just now calm corner break. Inside, he made quick and not too controlled paddle moves to stay on the desired safe from the swell feeling spot. Relax, man! Look at a cave as at a virgin, she’s dark and wet, make slow, smooth movements, and then she will let you in and let you stay comfortably inside, with you in sync of her swell movements! 🙂

The next gap between a large rock and the cliffs was inviting for me to pass through, but I saw a larger wave coming when unfortunately I had already started to go. I saw Eyal following me a bit to my left, and was shouting “There comes a large one!” to hopefully get him to back out again. This is what he eventually did, i saw him just about dancing on the break over the rock, whereas I had the wash over the rock to run out just on my line. Another large one followed with the same close shave, but I was doing fine, and Eyal was safe. I explained to him that when I was going through a gap, he better follows my exact line, which may be quite a narrow one in case of larger waves. And he always needs additionally to look for himself, not just follow me without checking to waves. Ok, my timing on this one was also not the best…

More beautiful stunning cliffs and short crossings followed, until we checked on a white friendly looking beach for lunch. It turned out only on the last meters approaching, the boulders were simply too large to be suited for our fragile kayaks, despite low swell breakers. So we had lunch on the water just upfront, with Tula’s good bread, Camembert, eggs, mayonnaise, almonds stuffed olives, green pepper and a plum for desert.

Eyal comes out of a family of musicians, his mother is a violin player in an orchestra. All his siblings learned to play an instrument, Eyal’s was a trumpet. As I like to sing when I am paddling by myself, at some point when we were talking about music, I dared to do so in the presence of my paddling partner – the first one who got the “pleasure” to listen. Eyal actually added also some singing, rather the “trumpet instrument” style, but we had a lot of fun!

More caves, more cliffs and short crossings followed to the amazingly quite current free dead calm McArthur Pass. A last calm short crossing to the stunning Harrington Point, where six caves in a row satisfied my curiosity for the day. A huge arch, and an stressed Eyal paddling far ahead who was sick of me waiting sticking my nose into all those dark holes. Or was it rather about me, who was teasing him if he loved to rather suck on “antennas” (of his VHF radio, he just did exactly that…) instead of doing and enjoying what I did?? Sorry, I sometimes have naughty fantasies…

At least he was waiting for me at the turn point into Ariadne Cove. There was a boat sitting already in there, firsthand looking like a fishing trawlers with those large poles sticking out to the sides (which prevents the boat from rocking while anchoring). But it was a private motor yacht, with Susan and Pete as the owners. We got invited on board for a chat, and got a brief tour through the floating palace. Both are active kayakers, had two good fiberglass kayaks strapped on the roof, and have even met on this sport a bunch of years ago. I found them very inspiring and interesting to talk to – Susan, a very attractive, seventy three years old well shaped woman with a long blonde-gray braid, who is was married to Pete who is fourteen years younger. She is a Buddhist, Psychologist, Yoga-lover and mountain runner, while he was a submarine driver and FBI agent (did I get it right?). Their motor yacht “Four Seasons” is based in Seward, while their home is in Anchorage half of the year when they are not out on the water. Always exciting into who you are running in to on such a trip!

Our beach was just 100 m further, and I opted for a gravel spot, while Eyal preferred the forest just behind me. We had a yummy (but probably not well-healthy) cheese fondue inside my bug-free tent, and are looking forward to another bunch of low-wind low seas paddling days!

by Freya at July 25, 2017 05:14 am

Mon 24/07-2017 Day 122

Pos: 59.3217,-150.8797Loc: before Tonsina BayAcc: tentDist: 32,2 kmStart: 7:55 End: 15:30Launch was late, as I fell asleep only just before midnight yesterday. We passed the anchoring “>

by Freya at July 25, 2017 05:09 am

Sat 22/07-2017 Day 120

Pos: 59.6371,-150.0421

Loc: Paguna Arm
Acc: tent
Dist: 41,1 km
Start: 7:15 End: 17:15

The night’s high tide got close, but had still space for three more days to rise. Eyal was so worried about getting flooded, that he barely slept until 12.30 am high tide. I might have also kept one eye more open, so the slightly longer sleep in the morning was alright. It was even a longer haul back to the water this morning over the river flat, as it was lowest tide. This beach was not the best choice with plenty bugs, but there was not really an other one on the way. No bears at least.

We paddled in bright sunshine into the end of the Northwest Fjord to see the final stunning glacier tongue in snowy white. Already yesterday, we heard on many glaciers frequent roaring thunder noise on avalanches or ice breaking off. We could not always see it, but today was the chance! It looks like a waterfall, when an avalanche is going down. No really big calving of ice bergs though here on this glacier. There were plenty ice floes, but all of them less than a meter. Some of them hosted a few seals. Just the Polar bears were missing – they will be coming later!

We tok wonderful pictures in the morning sun, which was the best decision to go today. I took some stunning mirror image pics, and Eyal had the chance to take out his big camera on calm water. But it was freaking cold! I had to constantly suck on my fingers
to keep them halfway thawed, and my feet were frozen even through my ground pad.

When we had enough of the freezing glacier view which gets you dizzy at some point with the steep high cliffs around, we had to fight some headwind and counter current to get out of the bay. What goes up, must come down…at least a small play in the breaking waves of the moraine bar in the middle of the bay interrupted the hard work.

Out on the open coast again, the swell got noticeable, but Eyal was feeling fine out here, thank goodness. I am really not keen to fish any of my paddling partners out of the water! At Harris Point, the swell and water got quite lumpy, as we were paddling through a gap of an island, still fighting 1,5-2 km/h current. I quickly took a few pictures, an just behind the gap, Eyal decided he had to pee…what a great spot! Drifting backwards to the rocky island, still in swell and rough water…I couldn’t help but to point my finger at my forehead towards him. I really do not need such performance of “I’m feeling comfortable in this water” out here!

But thank goodness, he survived, and I could relax again. At the end, he is fully responsible for his own actions. He is not my student, I am not a teacher, we are simply paddling partners. But if things go wrong, people may blame me as I am obviously the more experienced one.

Eyal behaved the rest of the paddle very friendly, did his best to not paddle ahead as he is tempted to do again and again, an all was good. We enjoyed some whale sightings, one of the guy showed his fluke again and again, as if he was diving head down only. We saw this uncommon behavior already yesterday! Unfortunately, he was quite away.

Then came the last excitement, after we digested the stunning cliffs at the headland around Surok Point – is the bay we are aiming for sheltered enough, and has it a suitable beach? ! Yeah, it had a wonderful calm sunny gravel beach! We were both excited, but I was suddenly making quite a disappointed noise – right in the middle, just still in the sunshine, a black bear was promenading to the right side into the shade. he was leisurely digging in the sea weed. I pointed to Eyal to not chase him away yet, and we paddled closer and took a bunch of pics. The relatively small black bear lifted his head with a cute little light brown nose, but barely took notice about us, and kept on walking away to the shady corner where we did not want to land anyway.
“Ok, I think here is space for all three of us! No need to chase you away yet, keep on eating until you are full, then you may not like to sniff for our food!” This was at least what I was thinking…Eyal was seriously suggesting to land on some other beach tonight…no way…and on which one? The choices are very limited here and far apart, and this one was perfectly sunny, sheltered, and it had a large water fall in the back ground!

After we made camp, it was water fall shower time! This was really a HUGE one, about 50 m high, and wonderful fresh cold! We fooled around, took pics, and really enjoyed this rare refreshing and cleaning opportunity in bright sunshine! Eyal found a few salmon berries, but they still need to ripe more. He made dinner including whale show with a small fire where he roasted sausages and eventually burnt all our trash. It was a great sunny day today! Who needs TV? Thanks to Eyal to be a good paddling and camp partner!

by Freya at July 25, 2017 05:08 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Unexpected visitors

Our day got most interesting when we stopped paddling! A green canoe with an engine approached the small bay we’d just landed in. Dora, her husband Putulik and their 10 year old daughter Mariam were on a day trip from their home in Wakeham Bay looking for caribou to hunt. They invited us to come […]

by Justine at July 25, 2017 03:39 am

July 24, 2017

josebelloseakayaking

Hacia el Oeste..

Continuamos con nuestro pausado recorrido hacia el W por la costa asturiana. Desde Rodiles (Villaviciosa) hemos tenido más mar, por lo que se han disminuido las posibilidades de recorrer con más detalles todos los recovecos del litoral.


Me sigue sorprendiendo esta costa en la que verdaderamente cae la montaña, los helechos llegan a las rocas marinas.


 En alguna etapa hemos llegado a ciudades importantes, Gijón por ejemplo.



O ..... Avilés a la que entramos donde por la ría.


O pueblecitos llenos de encanto como Cudillero.


Algunas etapas han sido mas largas, por lo que hemos tenido que salir con el amanecer, que nos ha regalado momentos de paz y belleza.


Hemos pasado cabos importantes, como Cabo Peñas y Cabo Vidio.






Mar de fondo.



Los temas de logística al final e inicio de etapas siempre presentes..



Lo bueno de ir dos es que solos puedes estar en desacuerdo con una opinión, sobre pasos.. horarios... etc.


Es broma....


Se han forzado los pasos interesantes que han ido apareciendo... siempre que no fuera necesario casco.. por el rollo de tener que sacarlo y ponértelo..... además en travesía hay que ser conservador.


En otros momentos, ha sido necesario tirar recto por cuestiones de horario de llegada a determinada playa, por el tema marea etc...


Continuará.....


by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 06:17 pm

Merci pour le kayak !
Pratique du kayak de mer

Sardaigne Est (3) : de Cala Gonone à Santa Maria Navarrese

Voici la suite du parcours, de Santa Lucia à Santa Maria Navarrese, avec cette 2ème partie, à partir de Cala Gonone. Ce parcours explore le coeur du Golfe d’Orosei avec ses falaises et ses plages de toute beauté… Cala Gonone Cala Gonone est le petit port qui permet aux visiteurs d’embarquer pour le Golfe d’Orosei. […]

by Arzhela at July 24, 2017 04:38 pm

Woman on Water
A woman's perspective on kayaking and outdoor adventures.

Eel River Mountains to Sea - Day 6

Into the Redwoods
On Day 6, we launched from Cain Creek Crossing and continued down river.  Our spirits were a little low as it was raining again, and we knew that the whitewater portion of our trip was over.

Before too long, our spirits soared.  This current was moving us along quickly and the scenery was spectacular with lots of waterfalls.  We don't have a lot of good photos from this stretch of the river because of the low light and rain but our memories of it are how serenely beautiful it was.

We saw lots of nice beaches for camping.  The area was becoming more forested.  We were starting to see more coniferous trees along the river including redwoods.  It was a great day for floating and contemplation.

We stopped for lunch to explore a side creek that had numerous cascading waterfalls.  (one advantage of the rainy weather).

Just above the confluence with the South Fork of the Eel River, we were awed by redwood trees towering over us on both banks.  In some spots, the redwood trees, overgrew the railroad trestles. We were on the edge of Avenue of the Giants.

When we went under the Dyerville Bridge just above the confluence with the South Fork Eel, we knew the remote wilderness portion of our trip was over.  It had been a long day on the water.  We covered over 24 miles and were tired and chilled from all day in the rain.  We floated down to a gravel bar where Chris Creek enters the Eel River and set up camp.  We ate dinner and crawled into our tent for the night.

Day 7 Redwoods and 101

by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:34 am

Eel River Mountains to the Sea - Day Two

Paddling a Loaded Kayak

Day two, we loaded our kayaks.  Packing food, clothes, and equipment to live out of a whitewater kayak for 8-10 days can be quite challenging.  As we packed and repacked, what was truely essential was determined.  Tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tarp, stove, cook pot, water filter, spare paddle, and an extra set of warm clothes were determined to be the essentials.  In any extra space, we squeezed in fresh fruit, beers, and tequila.  
The challenge of packing whitewater kayaks for 8-10 days in the wilderness. Photo by Jeff Laxier
As we launched on our second day, I realized that I had not packed my boat evenly and my boat was stern heavy.  It felt like I was riding a wheelie down the river.  Waves and boils seemed to be constantly grabbing my unbalanced boat and challenging my balance and bracing skills.  At the top of the most difficult rapid of the day, a wave capsized me.  As my kayak flipped upside down and my head dunked in the freezing cold water.  With my kayak stuffed full of what we needed to live for the next week, I knew that I had to roll my kayak up right.  With hundreds of rolls under my skirt, I went on autopilot and rolled my kayak upright.
Cate starting down Ramsing Rapid.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
We did about 13 miles of the 17 mile Hearst Run on our second day.  In my opinion, it is one of the most scenic stretches of the Eel River.  In the spring, wildflowers add color to the river banks and hillsides..
Lupines and Indian Paintbrush growing on rocks along the Eel River.  Photo by Cate Hawthorne
About a mile into the Hearst Run, the river constricts into a tight gorge.  Ramsing Rapid aka Ramsing Corner is a class III rapid at the beginning of the gorge.  At high flows both Ramsing's Rapid and the gorge often challenge kayakers with whirlpools and boiling eddylines.  The flow was pretty high on our trip (possibly 3,000 cfs).  I have to admit that I was relieved when we emerged from the gorge.
Hey Diddle Diddle, Down the Middle through the gorge section of the Eel.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
On emerging from the gorge, we came across a wild pig and her piglets
Wild sow and her piglets along the Eel River.   Photo by Jeff Laxier
Other wildlife that we saw included river otters, deer, bald eagles, and a bear.  We saw the bear when we were camped at Indian Creek.  We had just finished dinner and were enjoying a couple of beers when the bear sauntered out from a cluster of rocks on the hillside just up river from us.  He strolled along, hopped up on a log and bounced up and down on the log.  He hopped off and continued on his way up the ridge seemingly unconcerned about us.
Our camp on at Indian Creek.  We were sitting on the large rock when we saw the bear.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
This was a really nice day on the river.  It was sunny and 60 degrees with little to no wind.  We managed to fit everything into our kayaks that we needed and the two of us were off on a wilderness kayaking adventure on the Eel River.
Cate and Jeff preparing to launch at Hearst on the Eel River.  Photo by Jerry Albright
Day 3 Camp Cranky Pants



by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:32 am

Eel River Mountains to Sea - Day Four

Big Water

On day four we awoke at Camp Cranky Pants to clear skies.  A good night's sleep and we were ready to paddle to the North Fork of the Eel - about 17 miles.
Launching from Camp Cranky Pants on Day Four
We started the day enjoying the scenery.  Since Dos Rios, the river has been moving fast but didn't have a lot of whitewater.  We knew that we would encounter some whitewater on the Dos Rios to Alderpoint Stretch but weren't sure when.  One of our favorite sights was an Ent - a walking oak tree - at least in our imagination.
The Walking Oak - An Ent?
A little further down, we recognized spy rock from photos.
Spy Rock
After this it was grab on hold for some spectacular big water whitewater.  We didn't get any photos of the whitewater because it was so fast and big and just the two of us reading and running down the river.  I LOVED it!!!  The waves were so big that you had to sight your line from the crest.  Jeff mentioned that this was the type of whitewater on the Grand Canyon.  It was so fun that we debated dragging out kayaks up to the railroad bed and portaging them up river to run a bit of it again.

In about 2 hours we reached the confluence with the North Fork of the Eel and our camping destination for the day.  It was only lunch time.  We had traveled 17ish miles in 2 hours.
Confluence of the North Fork Eel with the Eel.
We had lunch along the North Fork and debated whether to keep going or to set up camp for the night.  It was sunny and warm and we enjoyed watching a turtle walk up the side of the river, flop in and swim about 20 feet down stream and then walk back up and do it again and again and again.
Our lunch time visitor.
We decided to enjoy a day of sunshine in camp.  This has become our multi day paddling habit - make miles on rainy days and enjoy time in camp on sunny days.
North Fork Camp
The camp at the confluence of the North Fork Eel is a beautiful place.  We enjoyed some time taking in the scenery, catching up on trip notes, and took a short hike.
Our tarp and tent way, way, way, down there on the beach.
Beautiful scenery, interesting wildlife, fun whitewater, sunshine, and good company made for a great day!
Cate and Jeff camping on the Eel River. - April 2011.
Day 5 Whitewater and the Dilapidated Eel River Railroad



by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:31 am

Eel River Mountains to Sea - Day 5

Whitewater the Dilapidated Eel River Railroad

Day 5 - We awoke at our camp at the confluence of the main and north fork Eel to sunshine!!!  After enjoying the previous day of exhilarating whitewater and a relaxing afternoon and evening on the beach, we feel ready for whatever lies downstream.  We know that the toughest rapids of the Dos Rios to Alderpoint stretch are coming up.  They are class III, but we are expecting powerful hydraulics caused by the high water.

We start the day immediately with some fun rapids.  The river is still flowing very fast.  We estimate it to be in the 12,000 cfs range.  The water is quite squirrelly at this flow with boiling eddylines that grab at our kayaks and try to spin us about.

The country is fairly open.  The gradient of the river is not very steep but the current is fast for several miles.  Then around one bend, things drastically change.  The river constricts between some boulders, and we seem to be entering a steeper gorge section.  We suspect that we are at Island Mountain Falls and get out to take a look.

This was one of the most fascinating scouts that I have ever done.  I guess because I am continually amazed at all of the abandoned infrastructure, machinery, and rail cars of the Eel River Railroad.

The railroad through the Eel River Canyon was opened in 1914 to transport logging and mining materials and passengers between the San Francisco Bay Area and Eureka.  Since opening, the unstable soils and floods of the Eel River have wreaked havoc on the railroad infrastructure.  A continuous battle ensued between man and nature to keep the 95 miles of tracks and 30 tunnels clear.

The Eel River Valley has the highest erosion rate in North America.  The employees of the railroad were constantly working to clear the track, rebuild the tracks, remove debris from the tunnels and repair cave-ins.

Traveling down the Eel River, catastrophic devastation is evident everywhere.  Derailed cars lie on their sides on the steep banks of the river and in the bed of the river.  The ground has eroded out from under the tracks leaving the tracks suspended in the air and washed into the river.  From the river, most of the tunnels appear to be caved in or blocked by landslides.  Part of the wonder is the way that nature is working to reclaim the terrain.



In 1997 the railroad was abandoned.  Some of the Eel River Railroad employees now work for the Skunk Train in Fort Bragg and Willits.  It is fun listening to tales of their adventures on the Eel River Railroad.

We hiked along the railroad tracks to the bridge that crosses over the river and the entrance to the mile long tunnel that goes under Island Mountain.  It is called Island Mountain because the river circles around the mountain almost 300 degrees.  Standing on the bridge we are well over 100 feet above the river.  It is amazing to think that in December 1964 the river flooded over this bridge and into the tunnel.  During this Pineapple Express Storm, the river was flowing at 936,000 cfs.

At Island Mountain, we hiked along the railroad tracks.  From above we could see the line that we needed to paddle through Island Mountain Falls.  The water was definitely moving fast but the line looked fairly straight forward.

Our run through Island Mountain Falls was fun and exhilarating.  The line was straight forward but the hydraulics that we were paddling beside were HUGE.

On down the river we traveled.

The current was fast and we were enjoying the sights when suddenly the topography on the banks of the river got steep and lined with boulders.  The river was constricting, and we saw a horizon line - Kekawaka Falls.

Kekawaka Falls is a river wide hole (hydraulic).  The reversal was so powerful that I cleared it but it sucked me back in.  I dropped my edge and capsized but it flushed me out and I rolled up.

After Kekawaka Falls, the river valley started to open up and so did the skies.  We continued down river past Alderpoint which is the regular take out for multi day trips on the Eel.  We started scouting for a campsite but with the high water, they were hard to find.  We finally settled on a spot near Cain Creek Crossing where the golden spike was driven in to the rail line in 1914 to celebrate the opening of the Eel River Railroad.  The railroad was closed that same day due to a landslide.

At our camp, we prepared for the upcoming days of flat water - including paddling through the giant redwoods trees of Avenue of the Giants.

Day 5 Into the Redwoods

by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:30 am

Eel River Mountains to Sea - Day 7

Redwoods and 101

We awoke on Day 7 a bit stiff and sore but excited to see the sun.  Our journey today would take us through some of the largest trees in the world - the coastal redwoods.  The river was still flowing very fast and was in a semi-flooded state.  We enjoyed the current pushing us down river.
Giant redwood stump in the flooded Eel River .
We pulled over to take a hike in one of the groves of Avenue of the Giants.  For our hike, we took off most of our paddling gear but kept our drysuits on.
Hiking up a creek to get into the Avenue of the Giants.
We came upon a local photographer that was hiking in the forest.  He looked at us like we were aliens - guess we looked a bit odd in our drysuits.  We said hi and continued on.  He doubled back and asked us why we were dressed in yellow suits.  We explained that we were on our seventh day of kayaking the Eel River from the mountains to the sea, and we just pulled over for a hike in the redwoods before continuing with our journey.
Hiking among the giant redwood trees of Avenue of the Giants.
He was very interested in our trip and shared that he likes to do multi-day cross country motorcycle camping trips.  We inquired about his photography and found out that he is an amateur photographer that works full time in the lumber mill in Scotia.  After an interesting chat, he wished us well and we continued on our hike.
Photos barely do justice to the grandeur of the redwood forest.
It felt good to stretch our legs, eat some lunch, and of course enjoy the awesomeness of the redwood forest.
An abandoned road in Avenue of the Giants.
Back in the boats, we journeyed along the 101 corridor.  The river is quite wide at this point and moving fast.  At times we still see evidence of the Eel River Railroad.  We also notice that the geology has changed significantly from the jagged, dark sandstone to smoother, lighter colored sandstone.

At the town of Scotia, we landed to stretch our legs.  Jeff decided to jaunt into town and get some tasty beverages for our last night on the river.  Up until this point, we have been totally self sufficient.  We had planned enough food for 10 days and still had plenty, but why not enjoy a comfort of being close to civilization.  As he started to hike up the hill toward town, the local photographer that we met in the redwoods greeted him and gave him a ride into town to the local market.
Landing at Scotia near an old dam.
On down the river we traveled.  Highway 101 crossed over us numerous times and seemed to be ever present.
Highway 101 crossing the Eel River.
We found a campsite on a gravel bar that was on a bend away from the highway and enjoyed our last evening on the river with a nice bottle of wine and another one pot meal.
One pot meals were lightweight but hearty and easy to prepare.
We planned to complete our journey and reach the sea the next day.
Last night camping out of our kayaks on the Eel River.
Day 8 - To the SEA!

by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:29 am

Eel River Mountains to Sea - Day Three

Camp Cranky Pants

On Day 3 of our Eel River trip, we woke to overcast skies.  As we packed up, it started to drizzle.  We put on the river with the goal of getting to below the middle fork confluence - about 16 miles down river.
Overcast skies aren't the best for photos.
The miles sped by quickly.  We stopped for a quick snack at the confluence of Outlet Creek. The 7 mile stretch on the Eel from Outlet Creek to Dos Rios is one of our favorite whitewater runs and one that we know quite well.  We didn't stop and play at our usual waves because we were excited to get into new territory for us below Dos Rios.  The river was flowing really fast.  It took less than an hour to run the 7 mile stretch.
Confluence of Main Fork Eel and Middle Fork Eel at Dos Rios.
At Dos Rios, the Middle Fork of the Eel joined the main river and added even more flow.  We estimated the flow of the river to be about 10,000 cfs (cubic feet per second).  It was moving really FAST!!!  We were watching for a specific campsite on the river but zipped by it and had to improvise.
Signs of the abandoned Eel River Railroad.
Below Dos Rios, our trip once again became wilderness.  The old railroad tracks paralleled the river, but there are very few roads into or out of many stretches of the Eel River.  Occasionally we would see homes in the mountains, but many appeared to be unoccupied.  We pretty much had the river and wilderness to ourselves - well not exactly.
Bear tracks by our kayaks.
When we were scouting a riverside campsite for the evening, we landed our boats on a sandy beach and walked 100 yards down river to check out a creek for water and camping.  When we returned to our boats, there were bear tracks in the sand right by our boats.  The tracks weren't there when we landed.  It gave us pause for a moment.  Fortunately these wild California black bears don’t associate humans with food.  Regardless, we didn’t store food in our camp.
Camp Cranky Pants
We were a little weary from the long day and missing our campsite destination.  Not too long after we set up camp, Jeff went to bed.  We called this campsite - Camp Cranky Pants.


Day 4 - Big Water

by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:28 am

Eel River from the Mountains to the Sea - An Idea

In April 2011, Jeff and I kayaked 169 miles on the Eel River from Lake Pillsbury to the Pacific Ocean.  At this time, I was a fairly novice whitewater kayaker and this was going to be my first multiday kayak camping trip.  An article I wrote about the trip was published in California Kayaker Magazine in Summer 2012.  I have edited it, made it into segments, and added more photos for posts to go with my series on the Eel River.  Here is the first segment of my tale.

Somewhere the idea was born - Let’s paddle the Eel River to the sea.  It was a notion based on our love of the Eel River, our curiosity to explore it more, and our desire to do an overnight wilderness whitewater kayak trip.  In the Fall of 2010, Jeff and I tossed the idea about and talked it over with Jerry Albright who knows the Eel River very well.  It turned out that he and a friend had done the trip that we were contemplating.  The idea was to paddle 169 miles of the Eel River from below Lake Pillsbury in Lake County to where it empties into the ocean in Humboldt County.

In the fall when we set our calendar for the year, we set aside 2 weeks in late April for our trip.  We figured it would be good to go in the spring when the days were lengthening and evening temperatures were not below freezing.  There was a good chance that we would have the right flow of water in the river as where as in the winter we could have too much or too little.

The beginning of April came.  We had the dates on the calendar and a notion that we wanted to do the trip but a million excuses not to.   We hadn’t announced that we were doing the trip because we were going to be selective about who we wanted to spend 7-14 days in the wilderness with and were uncertain as to how all the logistics were going to work out.   We knew that any companions on this trip would literally have to be able to go with the flow.  Flow was probably the biggest concern - it could be too much or not enough.  As our departure date approached, the water level was low.  It looked like we would be bumping and scraping along in the upper sections.

Despite the low water flow, we made up our minds to go and set about preparations.  Jeff’s tasks were assembling safety equipment, programming the GPS, compiling the camping gear, setting up the SPOT tracker, and shuttle logistics.  My primary task was food preparation.   No big deal - right?  The trip is just down river and 10 days worth of food and supplies isn’t that much to plan and pack. 
Ingredients combined into meals and vacuum sealed.
The challenge is packing all the necessities for 2 people to live in the wilderness for 10 days into 2 whitewater kayaks that are only 69 and 77 gallons in volume and don’t have dry storage compartments.  I got out the dehydrator and vacuum sealer and went to work planning one pot meals that would be condensed, nutritious, hopefully delicious, and require minimal fuel to prepare.
Dehydrated deli ham to add to meals for protein. 
Jeff’s planning involved mapping potential campsites, rapids that we might have to scout, potential side hikes, and points of interest (we would be paddling through some beautiful country including Avenue of the Giants.)  Jeff assembled our tent, water filter, stove, cooking utensils and arranged our logistics team.  A couple of good friends that could not join us on the trip helped us with logistical support including our shuttle to the put-in and take-out.

Finally, it was “go” day.   Cell phones were turned off and stowed.  We were now on river time.  Probably the best part about any trip in the wilderness is the simplicity of life - eat, sleep, paddle, and enjoy the water, the wilderness, and wildlife.

Stay tuned for tales of day one.

Making sure everything would fit for us to live for 2 weeks out of our whitewater kayaks.  Photo by Jeff Laxier





by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:23 am

Eel River Mountains to the Sea - Day One

April 2011 - Eel River Source to Sea Adventure

Our first day had some of the toughest whitewater of our trip and was one of the longest paddling days.  Jerry joined us for day one as we paddled 25 miles from Pillsbury to Hearst.  
Jerry Albright joined us for day one of our Source to Sea Adventure. Photo by June Ruckman
A little bit of rain triggered snow melt.  The flow of the river increased from a slow and shallow 350 cfs (cubic feet per second) to a fast and technical 1500 cfs.  At this flow some of the rapids were in the Class IV range.  As a progressing whitewater kayaker, this run was the most technical whitewater that I had yet to paddle and a good test of my developing skills. 
Kayaking down the Pillsbury stretch of the Eel River. Photo by Jeff Laxier
The rapids were fast and furious with powerful hydraulics to avoid while maneuvering through tight boulder strewn channels.  A rapid called Double Drop was one of the most significant rapids of the day.  It was a bend in the river with an elevation drop where the water was funneled between gigantic boulders.  At lower flows the rapid presents 2 distinct consecutive drops.  As we scouted it from shore, the 2 drops were not distinct.  They appeared to have merged into a huge frothing channel of chaotic whitewater with diagonal, lateral and reversal currents.   Jeff ran the rapid first and hit a clean line.
Jeff cruising down Double Drop on the Eel River. Photo by Cate Hawthorne
Back in my boat at the top of the rapid, I felt surprisingly calm.  However, as I committed to dropping into the frothing madness of the rapid, my heart was in my throat.  Time was suspended for a moment and the mantra “Lean forward and paddle” came to mind.  I dug my paddle blade into the water and launched into the mayhem of whitewater.  Plunging into the rapid, my boat buried but resurfaced.  I powered forward timing my paddle strokes with the waves to stay upright.  I dropped cleanly down the line and eddied-out in the calm water below the rapid. 
Cate finding her way down Double Drop. Photo by Jerry Albright
Feelings of elation and relief were overwhelming as I looked up at the walls of foaming whitewater that I had just descended.
Double Drop Rapid on the Eel River. Photo by Jerry Albright
Double Drop was the biggest rapid of the long 25 miles that we ran.  The portage around Van Arsdale Dam was not particularly fun but was a piece of cake compared to negotiating the maze of willows and strainers below the dam.
Van Arsdale Dam on the Eel River. Photo by Cate Hawthorne
I think that negotiating the willows was more stressful and potentially dangerous than the rapids that we ran on the Pillsbury stretch.
Mazes of willows with swift current challenge kayakers to find a safe route. Photo by Jeff Laxier
It rained on us most of the day and the river continued to rise.  This was a blessing on many of the flat stretches below Van Arsdale and also promised that we would have a swift water journey as we paddled to the sea.  At the end of the day, we were happy to reach Jerry's chalet on the Eel River for a warm meal, shower and dry bed.
Paddling into the Albright Chalet on the river. Photo by Jeff Laxier.
The next day, we would be loading our boats and heading down river for the rest of the adventure.

Day Two - Paddling A Loaded Kayak



by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 11:21 am

Océanos de Libertad

Cies islands circumnavegation.

P1210549
Lighthouse on top of the cliff

P1210624


P1210474
Limens Beach
P1210490
In the background Cies Islands.
del


I woke up early in the morning...my aim was to paddle from Liméns Beach (Limens Campsite) to Cies Islands. Firstly I paddled close to the coast until arriving Subrido cape, where I had a nice experience with a group of dolphins, I enjoyed watching them playing and swimming, but I had to continue on my way.  Once I made the crossing, I headed to the north and then I confront the bow of my kayak with the waves...The west side of the island is rough in contrast with the beatiful beaches on the east side.


P1210510
The north of the island.
P1210518
The west side of the island.
P1210531

P1210537
Rough water

If you want to enjoy a kayak experience in Cies island, you can ask for the Sea Kayak Base  where you can get guided sea kayak  tours with one of the most experienced guide you will never know...humble and nice person. Base KDM islas Cies

The circumnavigation of the island is only avalaible for experienced kayakers
P1210540

P1210565

P1210579

by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2017 09:46 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 23/07-2017 Day 121

Pos: 59.5740,-150.5058Loc: Ariadne CoveAcc: tentDist: 46,1 kmStart: 6:55 End: 19:20Our bear from the landing last evening did not show up any more. He seemed to have well eaten digging in the sea weed, and I think he thought what I was thinking – there is space for all three of us on the beach!We guessed it would be again a sunny day, but as soon as we reached after a short crossing aptly named Cloudy Cape, low hanging clouds were covering all mountain peaks around. No big deal, I actually rather not paddle in bright sunlight. Cloudy Cape offered two wonderful big caves, the left wide big one was a real “>

by Freya at July 24, 2017 06:45 am

Björn Thomasson Design
<div class="container"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <img class="logo img-responsive" src="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/img/lemoon-logo.png" alt="logo" /> <div class="lang"> <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-GB">English (UK)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-US">English (US)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=sv-SE">Svenska</a> </div> </div> <form name="aspnetForm" method="post" action="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx" id="aspnetForm"> <input type="hidden" name="lemoon.rooturl" id="lemoon.rooturl" value="/" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATE" id="__VIEWSTATE" value="ueMz1SfkeDfF0uDglAKg1IPmRXYzEdltLTioJQPF1bftv7L/MY7vlocYqr0nozgQE7w7s4YEB2Ce4NFr3XpA+yln17xueWGLb7Jxs0SlUaA=" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" id="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" value="1231C1A0" /> <input type="hidden" name="__EVENTVALIDATION" id="__EVENTVALIDATION" value="Ewbv/GCR8dth81dNUTL8ojkaN+/+0aNBXLbUdK8p2Ed/Cunu9KyOHRj8OkN5u7JZSjdgZK/4TJFc+qDo4ZGc5vIr4M6rM/2afoPFPQIDyW1ClzYSQYRzzO8fSlZ5pGOA" /> <fieldset class="form-horizontal"> <legend>Setup Lemoon</legend> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <p class="form-control-static"> Please verify that the following requirements have been met. </p> </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <ul class="list-unstyled checks"> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Can open database connection </li> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Supported version of SQL Server </li> <li class="failed"> <i class="fa fa-ban"></i> Database is not empty <em>An empty database is required for setup to continue.</em> </li> </ul> <a id="ctl00_content_checkButton" class="btn btn-default" href="javascript:WebForm_DoPostBackWithOptions(new WebForm_PostBackOptions(">Check again</a> </div> </div> <div class="buttons form-horizontal"><div class="form-group"><div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> </div></div></div> </fieldset> </form> </div> <div class="alerts"></div>

Swift/2 – Chris Gash

Swift/2 – Chris Gash

En ny snygg Swift/2 i Wales...

"Here’s my new Swift 2. It’s more stable than I expected, but I usually paddle a K1. I need to finish it a little further, but it’s paddling time, so I’ll tidy it later. Great fun to build.

The paddlers are John Willacy (Taran designer) and Pascale Eichenmüller. 

seems to cope well with our estuarial water so far.

Chris Gash, North Wales UK"

John Willacy and Pascale Eichenmüller paddling Chris Gash's new Swift/2

by Björn Thomasson at July 24, 2017 06:33 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

City of Water Day - a few more pix, and a great album (with stats) from a friend!

Wow, don't know what happened to last week, I'd meant to put these up much sooner. I didn't end up taking that many pictures during City of Water Day because after a slightly slow start, things picked up and I was helping out all day, either on the water or getting people onto and off of the water. However, here were a few pictures I did take - and then clubmate Chris B. was on land all day and he got a ton of great photos, which he shared in a Google album which he prefaced with the thank-you email sent out by Barbara T., who was our amazing organizer for the day. That email included the final statistics for the day, which were pretty impressive! Click here to view.  






by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at July 24, 2017 01:31 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Holiday mode

It felt like a holiday today, a beautiful warm, blue sky morning with the occasional gentlest of breezes ruffling the otherwise mirror calm water. We didn't have to do any big crossings of fjords of bays so could potter along near to the shore, admiring the many permutations of steep rockfaces. We adjusted our course […]

by Justine at July 24, 2017 12:27 am

July 23, 2017

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Ei natt i midnattsola

Det var ikke så mange netter igjen med mulighet for å telte i midnattsola. Det lå skyer ut mot havet, dermed dårlige muligheter i natt også. Men det lå jo uansett an til å bli flotte farger...

Ett av stedene jeg hadde vurdert var Bufjellet ved Nykvågen, men det er naturreservat og jeg trodde ikke her var lov å campe. En sjekk i forskriften avkreftet imidlertid dette, delen av reservatet som ligger på Langøya dekkes ikke av forbudet, og jeg tenkte uansett å legge meg utenfor reservatområdet.  Da blir det tur!
Jeg var seint ute, dro hjemmefra først mot midnatt. Her har jeg stoppet i Auenfjorden for å ta dette bildet. En fin kjøretur mot Bø var en god start på turen, som denne gangen skulle gå til fots.

Jeg parkerte oppe på Sandvikhalsen. Herfra er det ikke så langt videre opp til knallutsikt, men sola var nedi skyene da jeg kom fram. Æsj. Jaja, dette ville bli fint uansett. Jeg pakket sekken som jeg skulle prøve for første gang, med telt, sovepose, liggeunderlag, dunjakke og litt drikke.

 ÷
Mens jeg pakket kom det første glimtet av sola opp over skypølsa ute i havet. Hurra!

Jeg gikk litt lenger opp på fjellet enn jeg hadde tenkt først, rett og slett for å komme litt unna eventuell bilstøy. Det var dessuten mye stein (selvfølgelig), så det var ikke helt enkelt å finne teltplass. Men jeg trengte ikke store plassen, så det løste seg greit. Jeg var imidlertid glad jeg hadde sett instruksjonsviedoen, sånn at jeg husket å feste en av bardunene til ryggsekken, for den lille vinden som var tok godt tak i teltet. Mye vindfang.

Dermed kunne jeg sovne til denne utsikten! Full åpning på Hilleberg Rogen. Det er vel første gang faktisk, at jeg sover i denne nye utgaven. Har hatt det med før, men da sov jeg i hammocken. Som vi ser er det to muligheter for å rulle opp ytterteltet. Akkurat det er litt tricky, døren ramlet lett ned.

Soveposen Huldreheimen fra Helsport har jeg hatt i noen år nå. Det er en god sovepose med mange fine detaljer. Til og med en lomme inni posen der jeg kan oppbevare mobilelefonen! Det fant jeg nylig ut da jeg leste en test... Hadde hatt den i mange år før jeg fant det ut, he he. Men den er nyttig, jeg har "mistet" telefonen inni posen noen ganger før, ja. Slutt på det nå.

Rogen har to utganger, her er den andre med bare én rullet opp. Trehyrna i utsikten er slett ikke så verst, flott fjell.

Klokken ble halv tre før jeg sovnet, veldig seint til meg å være, men jeg konkluderte med at det definitivt var verdt det. Takk til Elisabeth og andre som pushet på for at jeg skulle komme meg av gårde.

Jeg sovnet med midnattsol inn den ene døren, og våknet med sola inn den andre. Det var akkurat som jeg håpet. Plutselig kom det to turgåere rett inn i utsikten min, jeg hadde visst teltet litt nærmere stien enn jeg var klar over. Men det gjorde i grunnen ingenting, det er ikke akkurat folkevandring opp her.

Fortsatt fin utsikt mot havet også, som var litt mer ensfarget blått i dag.

Nå følte jeg meg litt som disse folkene på Fjellforum som driver og telter i steinrøyser hele tiden. De pleier nok å gå litt lenger enn meg da, men. Angrer ikke på at det ble rødt telt, jeg synes det gjør seg godt på bilder.

Utsikt helt bort til Hovden, der sto vindmølla stille i dag.

Her med utsikt til Trehyrna, og vannet nedenfor der jeg har bilen stående.

Jeg pakket ned ringene, og la sekken ved stien. Når jeg først var her så måtte jeg jo ta en tur opp på toppen også. Flott utsikt ned til Spjøten.

Her står bilen, og så er det utsikt ned til Sandviksanden. Flott strand.

Nykvåg og Hovden.

Er dette kanskje ei Reinrose? Området har spesiell vegetasjon, veldig alpint landskap selv om det er så kloss i havet.

Disse fjellfolk-bloggerne er så flinke til å ta bilder med seg selv på, så jeg måtte ta frem selvutløseren og ta et sånt bilde jeg også. Så her er jeg, med nysekken på, traskende på stien.

Flott orkide, de så ut til å være på den siste blomstringen. De fleste var blitt litt shabby nå. Det samme med det jeg tror kanskje er reinrosa også, de fleste sto nå med frøstander.

Ikke helt typisk meg å finne ut at jeg skal telte her.

Mange fine detaljer å se underveis.

Jammen var det teltere nede ved Sandviksanden også. De hadde jeg da ikke sett i går kveld? Var det jeg som var for trøtt til å se dem, eller kom de enda seinere enn meg? Det forblir nok uvisst. Ikke er det nøye heller.

Turbilen og Trehyrna.

Jeg tok turen til foreldrene mine for å spise frokost og gå på do, traff på disse her underveis. Svaneunger er såvisst ikke stygge.

Hjemme (hos mine foreldre, ikke meg) var den faste billa kommet på plass i skogskjeggen. En gullbasse, hvis jeg husker riktig. Det er ei kjempefin, nokså stor bille, som går i grønt og lilla metallic. En bil i den fargen hadde gjort seg.

Nuvel. Det var ikke rare turen det ble, men jeg fikk blant annet testet gåstavene som jeg kjøpte i ferien i fjor, men som har blitt lite (ingenting?) brukt. Med sekk var det veldig kjekt, for da var det mindre fare for overbalanse og diverse forstrekninger. Jeg berget meg også unna en skikkelig overtråkk ved å kunne hive tyngden på staven istedenfor foten en gang, så dette tror jeg at jeg skal fortsette med.

by Miamaria (noreply@blogger.com) at July 23, 2017 01:26 pm

PAGAYEURS DU LEVANT
Blog collectif

Le Musée Canadien du Canoe







Le musée Canadien du Canoë est situé à Peterborough (Ontario), la capitale d'un des constructeurs mythiques de canoës, la célèbre entreprise Peterborough Canoe Company, au cœur d'une région dont sont originaires les formes les plus emblématiques de canoës, celles des fameux canoës d'écorce  Ojibwe.
Le musée retrace l'histoire du canoë, qui fut jusqu'à la fin du 19ème siècle le moyen de transport essentiel des indiens, des trappeurs, des prospecteurs, des géographes, les voies d'eau étant les seules voies de communication. Avec en prime le canoë de Bill Mason.
Juillet 2017, Nadine et Jean Luc Bousquet, Sophie et Pascal paoli 

by Muscardin (noreply@blogger.com) at July 23, 2017 12:47 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

Örnsbergs kanotsällskap på tur juli 2017

Årliga turen med klubben. I år startade vi vid kajakeriet på Ingarö. Färden gick mot Tärnskär och Stora Alskäret utanför Sandhamn.

 

 

by Bengt Larsson at July 23, 2017 08:23 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sat 22/07-2017 Day 120

Pos: 59.6371,-150.0421Loc: Paguna ArmAcc: tentDist: 41,1 kmStart: 7:15 End: 17:15The night’s high tide got close, but had still space for three more days to rise. Eyal was so worried about getting flooded, that he barely slept until 12.30 am high tide. I might have also kept one eye more open, so the slightly longer sleep in the morning was alright. It was even a longer haul back to the water this morning over the river flat, as it was lowest tide. This beach was not the best choice with plenty bugs, but there was not really an other one on the way. No bears at least.We paddled in bright sunshine into the end of the Northwest Fjord to see the final stunning glacier tongue in snowy white. Already yesterday, we heard on many glaciers frequent roaring thunder noise on avalanches or ice breaking off. We could not always see it, but today was the chance! It looks like a waterfall, when an avalanche is going down. No really big calving of ice bergs though here on this glacier. There were plenty ice floes, but all of them less than a meter. Some of them hosted a few seals. Just the Polar bears were missing – they will be coming later! We tok wonderful pictures in the morning sun, which was the best decision to go today. I took some stunning mirror image pics, and Eyal had the chance to take out his big camera on calm water. But it was freaking cold! I had to constantly suck on my fingersto keep them halfway thawed, and my feet were frozen even through my ground pad.When we had enough of the freezing glacier view which gets you dizzy at some point with the steep high cliffs around, we had to fight some headwind and counter current to get out of the bay. What goes up, must come down…at least a small play in the breaking waves of the moraine bar in the middle of the bay interrupted the hard work.Out on the open coast again, the swell got noticeable, but Eyal was feeling fine out here, thank goodness. I am really not keen to fish any of my paddling partners out of the water! At Harris Point, the swell and water got quite lumpy, as we were paddling through a gap of an island, still fighting 1,5-2 km/h current. I quickly took a few pictures, an just behind the gap, Eyal decided he had to pee…what a great spot! Drifting backwards to the rocky island, still in swell and rough water…I couldn’t help but to point my finger at my forehead towards him. I really do not need such performance of “>

by Freya at July 23, 2017 06:03 am

Björn Thomasson Design
<div class="container"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <img class="logo img-responsive" src="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/img/lemoon-logo.png" alt="logo" /> <div class="lang"> <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-GB">English (UK)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-US">English (US)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=sv-SE">Svenska</a> </div> </div> <form name="aspnetForm" method="post" action="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx" id="aspnetForm"> <input type="hidden" name="lemoon.rooturl" id="lemoon.rooturl" value="/" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATE" id="__VIEWSTATE" value="ueMz1SfkeDfF0uDglAKg1IPmRXYzEdltLTioJQPF1bftv7L/MY7vlocYqr0nozgQE7w7s4YEB2Ce4NFr3XpA+yln17xueWGLb7Jxs0SlUaA=" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" id="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" value="1231C1A0" /> <input type="hidden" name="__EVENTVALIDATION" id="__EVENTVALIDATION" value="Ewbv/GCR8dth81dNUTL8ojkaN+/+0aNBXLbUdK8p2Ed/Cunu9KyOHRj8OkN5u7JZSjdgZK/4TJFc+qDo4ZGc5vIr4M6rM/2afoPFPQIDyW1ClzYSQYRzzO8fSlZ5pGOA" /> <fieldset class="form-horizontal"> <legend>Setup Lemoon</legend> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <p class="form-control-static"> Please verify that the following requirements have been met. </p> </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <ul class="list-unstyled checks"> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Can open database connection </li> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Supported version of SQL Server </li> <li class="failed"> <i class="fa fa-ban"></i> Database is not empty <em>An empty database is required for setup to continue.</em> </li> </ul> <a id="ctl00_content_checkButton" class="btn btn-default" href="javascript:WebForm_DoPostBackWithOptions(new WebForm_PostBackOptions(">Check again</a> </div> </div> <div class="buttons form-horizontal"><div class="form-group"><div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> </div></div></div> </fieldset> </form> </div> <div class="alerts"></div>

Träbåtsfestival på Tjörn

Träbåtsfestival 2017 på Tjörn

Västkustens Träbåtsförening arrangerar varje år Träbåtsfestivalen på Tjörn, ett välbesökt arrangemang med mängder av vackra nya och gamla träbåtar. Till årets upplaga fanns en inbjudan om att visa träkajaker och i samarbete med Kajaktiv Tjörn (återförsäljare av Frej) ställde jag upp med mina gamla Njord och Black pearl och Petrus (Petruskajak) hade med några kajaker och kanadensare i trästrip och plywood.

Vädret var fantastiskt på lördagen och arrangörerna spekulerade i uppemot 20 000 besökare. Söndagen började med hård blåst ovch regn och jag tog en paddeltur i Skärhamns omgivningar istället. Jag sjösatte vid stranden söder om Akvarellmuseet samtidigt som en grupp belgiska paddlare avslutade sin semesterpaddling där. De var ovana paddlare i hyrda kajaker och hade haft en härlig vecka runt Orust, men med 12-13 m/s sydväst och vågor kring metern var de nöjda med att ha klarat sig in till land utan missöden och kunde ringa uthyraren (Upplevelsebolaget) för att bli hämtade. Efter lunch mojnade det, solen tittade fram och besökarna strömmade till igen.

Många kajakintresserade besökare innebar tyvärr att det inte blev tid den här gången till att gå runt och titta på alla fantastiska träbåtar som var förtöjda i festivalområdet.

Träbåtsfestival 2017 på Tjörn 
Öppningsdags. Förträfflig plats vid ingången till festivalområdet – alla passerar vår monter

Träbåtsfestival 2017 på Tjörn
Strålande sommarväder...

Blekingsk jaktkanot – Träbåtsfestival 2017 på Tjörn
En mycket välbyggd liten blekingsk jaktkanot roddes en sväng in till vårt hörn av hamnen. Tyvärr var det fullständig stiltje så det var ingen idé att använda spriseglet.

by Björn Thomasson at July 23, 2017 05:56 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

Motivation highs and lows

I wanted to be at home having a hot bath, and watching a movie snuggled up on the sofa with the wood burner roaring. I’d have roast chicken and roast potatoes for dinner and some fresh fruit afterwards. Why did i choose, instead, to spend my time battling into a headwind in pea soup fog, […]

by Justine at July 23, 2017 03:10 am

July 22, 2017

josebelloseakayaking

Continuando con la costa asturiana

Nuevas etapas.... de pocas millas.. para disfrutar del litoral a fondo. Ultimamente el sol no se deja ver demasiado.


En Julio y con chaqueta..


Seguimos encontrando pasos interesantes..


Cuando pasa cada frente la mar queda estañada..


Los porteos son parte de cualquier travesía, si no duermes en la misma playa, toca cargar el equipo.



Algunas veces muy lejos.....


Otras muuuuuyyyyy lejooooos...!




Encontramos algunos bajos alejados de costa..


Y pocas veces pesqueros faenando.


Mar de fondo


Continuará...


by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2017 10:24 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Sommarhelg kring Järnavik & Tjärö

  Vi hängde lite i Järnaviks skärgård, kring Tjärö och Hällaryds skärgård lördag- måndag. Mestadels finväder som vanligt i Blekinge 🙂 Pia körde lite kurseri på lördagen och jag snirklade runt och badade samt klippslöade. På kvällskvisten kom Pia ut och vi bodde på Allböles utsida. Grymt fint ställe och superfint kväll. På söndagen paddlade...

Inlägget Sommarhelg kring Järnavik & Tjärö dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at July 22, 2017 01:21 pm

PAGAYEURS DU LEVANT
Blog collectif

Georgian Bay, Ontario

Kayak sur la baie géorgienne ( Sophie et Pascal Paoli, Nadine et Jean-luc Bousquet)
Située sur le lac Huron, la baie géorgienne est une véritable petite mer qui compte plus de 30.000 îles et 2000 km de rivages. Des côtes rocheuses, des plages de galets, bref un paradis pour le kayak avec tous les avantages de la mer mais de l'eau douce !

Nous y avons fait des navigations à la journée et de belles randonnées sur les sentiers littoral.





                                                             
                                                                      Fishing Islands


                                    Bruce trail au nord de la péninsule de Georgian Bay


                                               La côte vue du  sentier de Bruce Trail


A l'est de Tobermory

by nadluq (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2017 08:34 am

Rivière Noire (Québec)










Du lac Saint Patrice, 125 km en amont, nous avons rejoint la rivière Noire qui se jette dans la rivière Ottawa. Une semaine de descente en autonomie dans un environnement sauvage et un isolement absolu, de l'eau vive, des rapides, des portages, certains acrobatiques. Avec au rendez vous bien évidemment les moustiques, brûlots , taons et autres mouches noires. Ces derniers oubliés, reste le souvenir inoubliable de l'engagement que demandent les innombrables cours d'eaux de l'arrière pays québecois.
Juin 2017, Nadine et Jean Luc Bousquet, Sophie et Pascal Paoli

by Muscardin (noreply@blogger.com) at July 22, 2017 07:27 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 21/07-2017 Day 119

Pos: 59.8004,-150.0170
Loc: Northwestern Fjord
Acc: tent
Dist: 42,4 km
Start: 6:00 End: 17:35

Oh, what a wonderful day!
Ok, for me it started with a bit too much waiting for Eyal getting ready and me getting cold in the wet dry suit, but oh well…all good. We both paddled right around the corner through a wonderful big calm lucky arch, when Eyal spotted a small waterfall to exchange and refill his bags and to disappear into the bush. i didn’t really get warmer while waiting…but then! The sun came out, and we paddled on the windy swell side down to Aligo Point, where the swell already grew to BIG.

And then – two ORCAS were jumping right behind us! And again! And again, coming closer! And again, even closer…we paddled quickly, I was squeeking for pleasure, but also for respect for those huge wonderful animals so high up in the sky. Only my second orca encounter, and then this close, and jumping! The orcas evntually took the shortcut through the islands, we spotted another group of three to the right, one of them with a small fin. So wonderful!

We liked to paddle around Granite Cape today, something I couldn’t 100% foresee what may be going on there after those tow big wind and swell days. I donned my PFD, and was asking Eyal if he was ok when the swell grew bigger. But it was nowhere breaking, just the swell would be intimidating for someone not used to it. It surely broke heavy at the point with the sea lion colony, but staying away in good distance, ne behind the other, was no problem.

I had already noticed on the eastern side of Granite Cape that the current was luckily with us with us paddling around 8 km/h, and I watched our speed while going around the point. I opted to go inside the outer rock with some, but not too lumpy and unbroken water, with 12 km/ h maximum. Thank goodness the current was with us! But it was actually around slack tide, and I think we were just lucky. On maximum current, it might have been pretty nasty lumpy and with much faster current – in either direction.

The other side was calm for a while, we could relax and admire the steep cliff. And we spotted a new set of jumping orcas!!! Buuummm, buuumm, buummm, again and again, this time a bit further behind us. And many more orca fins everywhere. Such an amazing day! We saw three fishing boats, but thank goodness none of them was in the ext highlight, Taz Bay. A wonderful located oval bay, about 600 x 100 m, with large granite boulder and a narrow entrance . A magic place! We got out of our kayaks, and climbed on top of the boulders to overlook the south western sea. What a place! Unfortunately way too early to camp.

Eyal just about from the top spotted his kayak getting afloat, and sprinted down to catch it before it was gone. Almost! We crossed in bright sunshine into the Northwestern Fjord with a perfect wonderful sunny view, getting even better by the minute. What a landscape! Alaska out of the picture album. We aimed for the point where a sandy bar was creating some breakers in the middle, surfed long swell waves, got hot and sweaty and stopped at a granite beach for lunch. We both had a nice dip in the already glacier water, and worked a bit on the sun tan. It was quite warm now! An hour later, we launched again to paddle closer to the glaciers.

But we spent too much time in Taz Bay and on the lunch break to make it with sun shine into the last fjord arm, so we rather stayed on the last beach and left the paddle deep into the glacier fjord for tomorrow morning. It may also not be sunny in there tomorrow morning, but at least we could enjoy a sunny evening on a rocky river beach.
Eyal sprinted ahead to land on the left side of the beach, where he thought was a bay close to the cliffs. I would have rather opted to land right at the river, and either to paddle upstream, or at least to drag the kayak upstream.

But ok, I followed the eager young man, and we had to carry the kayaks quite a way up the rocky beach. The sun unfortunately disappeared also way too early behind the mountains, and left us with a cloud of bugs. We made a walk to the river mouth later, to check the options we did not take, and I was not sure if the strong whitewater current would have allowed to drag the kayak upstream. There would have been a nice higher up campsite inside the bush, but I think our sandy side spot will also stay dry…if not, shame on Eyal 🙂 A peaceful bug free dinner inside my tent, cooked by my paddling partner. thanks! No bear paws nowhere.

by Freya at July 22, 2017 05:08 am

CackleTV
snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

50 shades of grey

We woke to grey skies, rocks and sea. Intermittent grey rain fell on us as we packed. But monochrome can be beautiful and each grey was different, the rocks varied from almost white near sealevel, to lichen clad black high on the hills, with dark green grass clinging to shallower gradients where it could. We […]

by Justine at July 22, 2017 01:59 am

July 21, 2017

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Hanøy, Ingelsfjord og Vedøya

Etter onsdagens tur med Lofoten-klubben så satte jeg kursen hjemover for å hente padleskoene og muffene som var i vaskemaskinen. I ettertid har jeg også funnet neseklypene som jeg har manglet en tid. De lå der de skulle, selvfølgelig, ikke rart jeg ikke fant dem... Men det ble litt sent med den pizzaen (og karaoke - vi sang ikke, bare led) så jeg ble ganske trøtt etter hvert. Så trøtt at jeg ville ende i grøfta, garantert.

Jeg stoppet derfor bilen på den første utkjørselen som var stor nok til å stå litt unna veien, ryddet plass til liggeunderlag og la meg der. Niks sovepose, neinei. Kledde på meg dunjakke og diverse ull, så gikk det helt fint. Nå lå jeg ved Hanøy-krysset, i fin posisjon for å samle et par skjær dagen etter.

Jeg regnet denne turen som en ypperlig anledning for å fiske, så jeg tok med meg fiskestang og denne fine wobbleren. Jeg hadde ikke kommet langt før snøres sleit av - faktisk bare så langt at jeg skulle da den løs fra snella. Heldigvis, for da ramlet ikke den i sjøen.

Jeg satte ut fra Hanøy. Det er så nært Lofoten at de er litt hysteriske for at folk skal komme dit og sette ut, de fleste parkeringsmuligheter er sperret av (Gud forby at det ikke skal få gro igjen der i fred, noen hadde til og med skiltet av det var ferdsel forbudt i fjæra!), men her var det laget en ny utsettingsmulighet. Jeg testet den ut, den fungerte greit faktisk, selv om den ser litt "grov" og uferdig ut.

Jeg satte kursen rett over Raftsundet, det var i grunnen like greit. Lite båttrafikk her akkurat nå på formiddagen faktisk. Jeg hadde ikke padlet langt før jeg fant den første fine stranda her.

Kun et lite stykke videre, så fant jeg den neste. Men det er ikke riktig så idyllisk som det kan se ut til på bildet – det ligger et oppdrettsanlegg like på andre siden, og der holdt de på med ett eller annet som støyet en god del.

Hurra, jeg fikk plutselig fisk! Dessverre ingen sjøørret, selv om det var en fisk som nappet litt tidligere og hoppet av, som godt mulig var det. Dette var en liten småsei, og den fikk slippe ut igjen for å bli større til neste gang.

Jeg fulgte land sånn høvelig hele veien til Ingelsfjordeidet. Like før sleit jeg av snøret og mistet den kule wobbleren, så da var fisket foreløpig ferdig. Her måtte jeg for øvrig ut av kajakken og dra over. Vips, så hadde jeg samlet meg en ny 10 på skjæret-post!

Jeg kikket på kartet, nei det laminerte kartet hadde jeg mistet (de flyter ikke!!!) – jeg kikket på GSPN og fant ut at det ikke var lengre inn fjorden enn at jeg måtte padle inn og se når jeg først var her. Disse innerste fjordtarmene er jeg jo ikke så begeistret for, men man kjører jo langs her på Lofast, så det kunne jo vært litt artig å se det fra denne vinkelen også.

Her står det at det er Fredningssone, med regler som i forskriften. Ikke var den lett å finne, og enda verre var det å finne ut hvilke regler som gjelder. Jeg klarte det ikke. Man kunne nok funnet bedre måter å gjøre det på, dersom man vil at folk skal bry seg om reglene. (En forespørsel om hjelp på FB tyder på at de fleste driter i reglene, det kan jeg godt forstå når man gjør det så vanskelig.)

Ei artig trehytte.

Sånn ser det ut videre innover, slett ikke verst.

Her sto det fem stykker med fiskestenger - og fisket i fredningssonen. Det kan altså være at noe fiske er lov her, eller så driter disse i reglene, for alt jeg vet.

Fjordtarmer mangler storhavslyden, men denne her tok det litt igjen på spektakulære fjell i området.

Denne fossen var heller ikke så verst.

Vannet den første med seg ned smakte også godt, jeg måtte jo teste.

Midt i ei steinur så jeg noe kjent - det norske flagget! Det var nå for galt at det skulle ligge her og slenge. Jeg gikk i land og tok det med.

Norge i rødt, hvitt og blått. Og litt grønt og grått.

En skjønn forsamling.

Dette er bubbelur-egg. Nærmere bestemt eggene til purpursneglen, Nucella lapillus, har jeg fått opplyst. Det stemmer sikkert, for det var en del sånne her.

"Ha ha du ser ikke meg, jeg er så godt kamuflert!"

Denne brennmaneten var ganske stor. Lys bunn gjorde det ideelt for fotografering, kanskje jeg kunne få et skikkelig bilde av den?

Dette ble ikke så verst?

Dette ble rene kunsten, spør du meg.

Er det sånn det ser ut å bli spist av en brennmanet? Jeg klarte i hvert fall å ta alle disse bildene (og enda mange flere) uten å bli brent, så jeg er storfornøyd.

Plutselig oppdaget jeg noe som beveget seg - to andre padlere! De var imidlertid på andre siden, så jeg fikk ikke snusen i om det var noen lokale kjentfolk eller frememde turistpadlere.

Purpursnegle?

Nok en fin forsamling.

Denne var kul! Kan det være en svartstjerne?

Innover Ingelsfjord, sett fra nordsiden av innløpet. Her var det noen holmer også faktisk.
Her har det nok vært en brygge eller ett eller annet. Kunne vært kult å bo i telt oppå her, tenkte jeg - men det er så kort til Vedøya at man legger seg nok heller der.

Plutselig gikk det opp for meg at det jeg trodde var en fôrstasjon til et oppdrettsanlegg bak en holme, faktisk var Hurtigruta som var på vei hit! Jeg måtte bare padle på for å rekke å få sett når den tok svingen sånn skikkelig.  Jeg rakk det! Men det var bare så akkurat.

Den tradisjonelle 90-graderen måtte på film. Men film blir bare sånn passe stabil når man vinker samtidig, tydeligvis.

Det er ganske stilig når hurtigruta seiler ned Raftsundet også. Men nå begynte jeg å bli litt sulten, så her kunne jeg ikke ligge i all evighet for å glo.

Vedøya-posten i boks!

I år har jeg sett mye flere ærfugler med unger enn tidligere år. Jeg håper det er et positivt tegn.

Her er cirka rute, hvis man ser bort fra alt sikksakket - det er Garmin Oregon som har lagt til for egen regning. (Jeg har aller minst padlet på land!) Den virker rett og slett ikke nærheten av så bra som den forrige, til tross for at dette er en ny utgave. Jeg har spurt dem om hvilke innstillinger jeg må ha for at den skal virke normalt, men det virker umulig å få svar på. Jeg får bare alskens rare spørsmål, og når de har gått tomme så begynner de å spørre om det samme som de før har fått svar på, på nytt. Kan ikke anbefale denne lenger.

Men det ble en flott tur, to nye skjær og en generelt sett veldig fin dag selv om det ikke var så blå himmel som jeg hadde håpet på.

Eneste skår i gleden var en jævla drone som surret når jeg nærmet meg Hanøya. Fy fader for et spetakkel, det høres jo ut som en gigantveps, og da blir man jo automatisk noe anspent. Hadde jeg hatt gevær hadde jeg nok skutt den, men det hadde jeg heldigvis ikke. Men han fikk sikkert fin film, og jeg var heldigvis omtrent ferdig med turen da den dukket opp.

by Miamaria (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2017 04:17 pm

Under fjellet med Lofoten-klubben

Onsdag var det klubbpadling hos Lofoten-klubben, så jeg kjørte til Svolvær. På turen fikk jeg handlet tørket elgkjøtt, og en julegave, så det var allerede god uttelling før vi kom oss i kajakkene. Turen skulle gå her, det de kaller "under fjellet". Like ved innkjøringa til Svolvær.

Jeg hadde pakket med meg det meste for å være rustet for hva som helst. Ferie, jeg ante ikke hvor jeg skulle hen etter padlinga. Men det viste seg å være ett og annet som manglet her inni likevel. Det første var padlesko. De lå i vaskemaskinen... (Men jeg har crocs liggende fast i bilen, så det var ikke helt bom. Men for lengre sikt, ikke bra.)

Vi ble fem stykker. Eilif, Boyd, Odd, og Stine. Sistnevnte var fersk i klubben og et nytt bekjentskap for meg.

Vi satte kursen ganske direkte mot Gullet. Det var lite vind i dag, men her ute skjer det som regel noe har jeg fått med meg.

Sånn her-ish.

De tre karene kjenner hverandre etter hvert nokså godt, så replikkene smeller imellom som kinaputter til tider, og litt dævelskap med hverandre finner de også gjerne på. Men jeg kan berolige nykommere med at de slipper greit unna, det er bare god underholdning. Men her har Eilif tatt hevn for en eller annen snø som falt i fjor, denne badingen var høyst ufrivillig fra Odd sin side. Dagens tips - stopp pratinga og hold kjeft (LUKK kjeften) når du går under.

Tror Eilif var nokså fornøyd med den. Odd har lagt seg litt bak, og pønsker nok allerede på hvordan han skal få tatt igjen...

Som vi ser var det litt gråvær i Lofoten. Hjemme var det oppholdsvær, men jeg kjørte visst ned til regnet. På Vågakallen satt et par klatrere og frøs, stakkar. De endte med å sitte der et døgns tid, stakkars. *Hutre*

Dette var et litt kult sted, her ble det en bølge innimellom og masse rot.

Det er fint å lukke øynene å øve balanse, men det kan ikke gjøres for lenge om gangen, da ender man snart opp i steinen. Men ellers lurt. (Er litt stressa etter den Inuk-testen som avslørte at balansen er krympet så grovt.)

Eilif i strålende humør.

Litt sol fikk vi også underveis.

Vi kikker litt hit, litt dit - kanskje gå i land nå når det er så fint værvindu?

Ja, det gjør vi, rett og slett.

Fire på skjæret, fem inkludert meg. Jeg holdt meg til vannmelon og rabarbramuffins, matpakken fikk vente. Det skulle vise seg lurt på sikt.

Etter rasten på skjæret var det om å komme seg på havet igjen. Stine er fersk men tøff, og trivdes utmerket godt i denne Neckyen. Ingenting tydet på at hun lot seg skremme av litt småkronglete ilandstigninger. Det var nå en grei hylle for meg med glassfiberkajakk også, for såvidt.

Jeg husker godt første gangen jeg møtte disse karene. Den gangen var det lite fres, men Eilif klarte å finne den største bølgen den dagen, og plasserte seg fint oppå et skjær. Og der satt han, i påvente av en like stor bølge (som aldri kom), som kunne skylle ham videre. Her står han relativt bom fast igjen.

Denne filmsnutten heter "Effektive framdriftstak - eller ikke", og handler om en turleder med til tider særdeles dårlig gli.

Men hva er det egentlig som foregår der borte?

Mange båter, det var liksom treff her ute. Norgående og sørgående hurtigrute, ferga kom, hurtigbåten. På ett tidspunkt så vi også Christian Radich men det var kanskje tidligere.

På vei tilbake til bilene fulgte vi land. Her og der var det snedige ting å finne på. Stine fikk testet litt bevegelig hav i Neckyen, og det gikk aldeles utmerket.

Eilif fant et fint sted å padle imellom. Men nok en gang havnet han på en stein. Så kom det en bølge og tok ham rundt. Om han hadde forsøkt å rulle så hadde det uansett ikke vært plass.

Så det ble ut av båten, og kameratredning. Boyd og Odd tok seg heldigvis av det, sånn at jeg kunne fotografere og filme.

Det gikk jo strålende, den ene tok seg av mannen, den andre kajakken, og så...

Kameratredning som også gikk greit for seg. (Bortsett fra foten som kommer mot trynet på Odd på 0.56, kanskje. Uvisst hvor tilsiktet den var...)

Nå hadde også Eilif fått seg en tur i vannet, noe han var strålende fornøyd med. Han hadde prøvd å få de andre (ok, kanskje det heter oss, jeg var jo med) med på å øve på redninger for det gjør vi vel de fleste litt for lite, men hadde ikke helt fått gehør. Vips, så var den biffen fikset.

Det ble ikke lange turen kilometermessig, men det behøver det jo ikke alltid å være. Stine fikk prøvd seg litt på forskjellig, det fine med å padle et sånt her sted i rolige forhold er jo at man kan tilpasse litt etter hva man selv har lyst og erfaring til. Vil man ikke i brott så holder man seg litt unna, mens de som synes sånt er skøy kan legge seg midt i. Noe for de fleste, rett og slett. (Bortsett fra rene milslukere. De ville fått vondt i margen.) Såvidt jeg kan se så var ferskingen ganske så fornøyd etter endt tur, jeg tipper hun blir med flere ganger?

Takk for turen alle fire. :) Noen av oss endte på pizzaspising etterpå, så takk for maten og selskapet der også. En flott onsdag kveld, tviler på jeg hadde kommet meg på havet alene denne dagen. Så dette var perfekt!

by Miamaria (noreply@blogger.com) at July 21, 2017 11:36 am

Horisont Kajak
Kajak i Stockholms Skärgård

POPULÄRA KAJAKKURSER

POPULÄRA KAJAKKURSER

Matcha rätt kajakkurs med rätt Paddelpass hos Horisont Kajak.

Har du mötts av att det varit fullbokat?

Vi vet. Intresset för våra kurser har varit stort i år. Mest populär har introkursen TÅNG varit. Den som omfattar det Gula Paddelpasset. Vi har försökt peta in extra tillfällen när vi kunnat uppbringa resurser. Men vi vill inte tumma på kvalitet och säkerhet, så vi har aldrig fler deltagare än 6 per instruktör.

Nu har vi en extra TÅNG den 20 augusti

Lars har erbjudit sej att köra en TÅNG den 20 augusti. Han är en av Sveriges mest meriterade kajakinstruktörer. Det finns 6 platser. I allafall i skrivande stund.

Vi har plats på fortsättningskursen BRIS den 29-30 juli

Vi har 3 platser kvar på tvådagarskuren BRIS den 29-30 juli. Den som omfattar det Gröna Paddelpasset och ger dej fler verktyg för att sticka ut och paddla med större möjlighet att göra riskbedömningar, tycka att livet är fint trots att havet bråkar lite med dej och att vara en trygg paddelkompis. Det här är också kursen för dej som vill följa med oss och vårt nätverk H2O på tur på silvernivå. Eller för dej som bara vill ha kul i kajak och lära dej grejer på vägen.

Läs mer om våra kurser här.

Välkommen!

Hur matchar jag rätt kurs med rätt Paddelpass?

Ska det verkligen vara nödvändigt med ett sånt där Paddelpass? Nja, det kan man ju tycka både ja och nej om. Vi tycker att det viktigaste är att du inhämtar kunskap. Det sämsta läget är ju när man är omedveten om vad man inte kan.

Det smartaste man kan göra är ju att inse hur mycket det finns att lära sej. Oavsett vilket ämne eller vilken aktivitet det handlar om. De allra flesta tycker ju att rolighetsgraden ökar med mängden inhämtad kunskap.

Är det inte ganska rimligt att man åtminstone går en nybörjarkurs i att paddla kajak? Hur det än är med kunskapstörsten så färdas du oftast tillsammans med andra personer och på samma arena som andra båtar. Du har ett ansvar för att du kan hantera ditt fordon. Du lyder faktiskt under Sjölagens (SFS 1994:1009) bestämmelser om gott sjömanskap när du framför din kajak.

Paddelpassen gör kunskapen mer mätbar. Vissa tycker att det blir roligare då. Andra struntar i det förstås. I vår egen turverksamhet, H2O, tycker vi att det är viktigt att man vet vad resten av gruppen har för kunskap. Det blir lättare att hjälpas åt då.

Matcha rätt kajakkurs med rätt Paddelpass hos Horisont Kajak.

Inlägget POPULÄRA KAJAKKURSER dök först upp på Horisont Kajak.

by Carin at July 21, 2017 08:43 am