Paddling Planet

May 23, 2017

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Mon 22/05-2017 Day 59

Pos: 54.7854,-132.4996 Loc: Round Islands Acc: tent Dist: 24,3 km Start: 06:35 End: 11:00
The last day staying mostly inside the tent was long, despite continuous rain I was eager to go this morning. But we had some different forecasts. Karel was on a short holiday and was not able to update his strong SE wind forcast from Saturday, Mike heard on the radio something about low winds today but gale warning tonight, and Peter sent us 10 knots south for today. The sea looked all right, wind was lowish, but it was still raining raining, raining…
We had made no clear decision the previous night, just that Mike was to come down to my tent from his campsite far upland to see if I had got an updated fore cast. As he was not coming, and I was not eager to go out of my tent in rain, I simply used my whistle to get him awake…sorry! We agreed to leave as soon as possible, as I was still expecting the wind may be blowing heavy again the afternoon.
The only think blowing heavy just after launching was a wonderful whale, feeding himself quite on the same spot under a swarm of birds, spouting, breaching, diving and showing his fluke, just what a whale has to do to please our eye! The sea had some swell, but all felt good on paddling. Just myself did feel fully wet and cold under my dry suit, as I was getting sweaty helping Mike this morning to get his gear down and was then waiting for about half an hour for him to pack. The launch was a bit critical, as Mike had to push his kayak first time over rocks being flooded with a swell wave, then jump on and paddle quickly off with legs still out. I couldn’t really help him on that…he just made it to stay balanced, not to get too much sideways and to get off the rocks in time, thank goodness, even without scratching his hull as feared. This beach on low tide was rather rocky than covered with easy small cobbles like we landed on mid-tide. But it was quite doable!
So my option on this rainy, but quite calm paddling day with bad visibility was to aim only for Round Islands, where I had spotted a nice tombolo beach on the sat images. The next safe landing option may be another 25 km away if my sat images search was good enough, and I was not sure how the wind would be developing, I really liked to stay on this A-class campsite! It was a wonderful flat dry sheltered upland meadow, with an all-tide sheltered landing beach. Mike was just worried to find a sheltered enough spot to spread his tarp over his tent in rain, and if it would still fly away once the gale wind would come over night? If he comes…so far, the whole afternoon was dead calm but with continuous rain. I was quite happy inside my tent, see what the fore cast tomorrow brings. I hope Karel is back to business with sending me the fore cast! He is doing such a great precise job, and I am really spoiled to be used to *read* it on my sat phone instead to have to listen to the endless VHF radio announcements which are not only hard to hear for a foreign language speaker. Thanks once more very much for your weather updates, Karel!

by Freya at May 23, 2017 02:43 am

May 22, 2017

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

A Cuil view


The cool northwesterly breeze dropped overnight but the sparkling sunshine of the previous day was replaced by an overcast and murky morning.  The long view up Loch Linnhe from our camp with snow capped Ben Nevis looks cold, but in fact it was a reasonably mild morning.






We decided to paddle straight across the loch before any breeze might start up and create the sort of choppy conditions we'd enjoyed the previous evening.  Landfall of the Morvern shore was made near the Glensanda superquarry, which as ever comes a a jarring intrusion into the loch scenery.





A few kilometres further on we stopped to take a walk around Arigh Shamraidh (the summer shieling).  Visible from across the loch as a green patch lined by trees, there are five ruined buildings and a field system here, the ruins probably date to the early 18th century but earlier maps how a permanent settlement of similar size.





Further along again we passed Camasnacroise (Bay of the cross) with its neatly painted white houses and church on the shore of Loch a' Coire. The church-related names include the hill which towers over the shore - Beinn na Cille (hill of the (monks) cell) In 1890 the village is recorded as having a church, school, shop and smiddy.  The village is quite remote by modern standards, and connected by tiny single track roads.





We enjoyed paddling the wild shore north of Camasnacroise, moving slowly and absorbing the atmosphere of the place.  A couple of potential camping spots came and went before we found a place on a level grassy platform above the shore.  The effort of carrying all our stuff up a steep 20 metre slope was rewarded with a view across Loch Linnhe to Cuil, from where we'd set out.

We could easily have crossed back and ended the trip without camping, but elected to spend another night out and have a short paddle the following morning.





We spent a pleasant evening enjoying the views from our camp, though the morning turned out damp with some drizzle and a thick mist.  I took some bearings and set up a route on my GPS as we packed the boats, as well as putting the VHF radios to "scan" in order to pick up any traffic from vessels moving on the loch which we'd not be able to see.




After travelling up the shore a little way we struck out across Loch Linnhe towards Cuil just as the drizzle stopped and the mist began to break into banks of low cloud.  With such damp, low-light conditions and little wind, we were thankful that the midges hadn't got going by this time in April!






All too soon we were back at Cuil in a rapidly improving morning with a fresh breeze dispersing the last of the cloud. 



 Our two night trip had been relatively short in distance at just over 50Km, but had been really relaxing as we'd deliberately kept our plans to the minimum and just gone with the flow.  It had also been a useful shake-out of our kayak camping kit, which had shown up a couple of deficiencies and necessary tweaks before a longer trip.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2017 07:48 pm

Horisont Kajak
Kajak i Stockholms Skärgård

Letar du efter en ny flytväst?

Kajakkurs hos Horisont Kajak. Matcha rätt Paddelpass.
Matcha rätt kajakkurs med rätt Paddelpass hos Horisont Kajak.

Letar du efter en bra flytväst?

 

Vi har fått hem två västar från NRS som vi tror kommer att bli storsäljare. NRS ION och SIREN har låg profil och är superdupersmidiga på kroppen.
En stor ficka fram som nås med en hand från båda hållen.
Prislappen är ganska rimlig tycker vi. 1140 pix.
Kom ut och prova. Innan de tar slut.
http://webshop.horisontkajak.se/flytvast-nrs-siren
http://webshop.horisontkajak.se/flytvast-nrs-ion

Inlägget Letar du efter en ny flytväst? dök först upp på Horisont Kajak.

by Carin at May 22, 2017 12:11 pm

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

Just wanted to say Hello.


1

by Fidel at May 22, 2017 05:02 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 21/05-2017 Day 58

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent no paddling today
The wind and rain stayed all Sunday as nasty as it was already all Saturday afternoon. I stayed inside my low ceiling tent, reading, sleeping and calling my partner Peter who is now in Sweden. At some point in the morning, I heard something or someone walking on the cobbles – thank goodness it was only Mike on his way to his kayak and not a bear…he really should shout out loud when approaching! I guessed he would stop by my tent on his way back, to say good morning and to thank me for having dragged up both our kayaks higher? But he disappeared silently into the woods again.
A brief spell in the rain made me thinking it is time for a walk, and to find Mike’s secret camp spot for a chat. It took me a while and some scary walks deep into the forest to find his hide, though the light blue tarp should be visible. He had selected a spot between dense low pine trees with somehow open ground where he could easily strap the tarp over his tent. A small fire and his hung food bags protected him from curious animals. Quite cozy actually in here! Maybe I should have joined him to camp inside the woods? Actually, I prefer to watch the ocean as long it is possible, and usually like to keep also an eye on my kayak. We had a brief chat, before it started to rain again and I disappeared once more into my own Hilleberg beach hotel. I hope we can paddle tomorrow, but so far it does not look really great yet…we’ll see!

by Freya at May 22, 2017 02:29 am

Sat 20/05-2017 Day 57

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent Dist: 25,4 km Start: 05:50 End: 11:05
Quite a day! Mike kept the big fire going over night, and no new bear tracks were running around our tent. I woke the man early to give him more than half an hour head start to pack, and actually fell asleep again, thank goodness. We got better in being ready packed together in time, but next day it has to be a full hour. But no worries, I wait for him on shore, and he does wait for me on the water! Well, mostly. 🙂
We had a beautiful calm morning as the other days, but Karel forecasted stronger southerlies 14-18 knots for the afternoon, still dry. And for Sunday, 20-30 knots SE, with rain. Ok, time to still paddle at least more than half a day!
The wildlife was lush this morning: We started off right after launching with about a dozen whales in various distances, with spouts everywhere and some guys breaching and diving down with displaying their big tail fluke. If that would be not enough, I guessed it it time now again for bears on this big island? Sure! I spotted a black spot on already the next beach a beach, but didn’t think it was one, as it was not moving. Mike was soon recognizing as *really* being a bear, and we paddled quickly up closer to the beach to watch him better digging between the rocks for food. Nice! At some point I started talking to the guy, to make him showing more than his fat behind. He slowly turned around, sniffed into the air, tried to see us, but didn’t really felt threatened and slowly kept on going with his business, and walked upland at some point. Nice pictures!
We paddled around the small headland to the next beach, and spotted him again – or was it another one? And another one? And another one? Thee black bears at one beach! Must have been mom and two youngsters, we assumed. Better stay in the kayak… 🙂
The next show of wildlife were some single seals in the water, a fat lonely sea lion on a rock, and many many sea otters floating around in the kelp behind the Narrows of Bean Island on their backs with their cute fluffy babys on their bellys. They are so cute!
To top everything off, about thirty eagles at the next headland were soaring in the air. Not bad wildlife day, we just missed the wolves!
There were three corners with tide rips marked on my chart: The south eastern headland of the big Prince of Wales Island at Cape Chacon was dead calm in the morning. we sneaked through the narrows of Bean Island and missed the rips at Nunez Point (if there were some…), but the real nasty looking headland was the area until surf point, with big black rock walls piling up upfront huge mountains. Still quite calm wind, though blowing off the mountains instead of southerlies as it should be. This changed very quickly, once we crossed the first bay which had a small sandy beach. Mike paddled close into it to have a look, I opted to cross in some rather nasty gusts off the mountains. Hmmmmmm…..how would be the next bay? It also should have a beach with landing options according to my satellite image view. Nothing to land really past this one, besides a tombolo on an island in about 20 km…
And now the wind came from SE as forecasted, and quite gusty with well over 20 knots! It was literally taking away from us the decision to land or not – it was high time to go to shore! The beach was at that time of the tide ok to land with kelp in a calmer corner and small cobbles, still Mike was a bit reluctant to damage his boat. Hey man, we didn’t ave any other option and we *need* to go in! Here! Now! I quickly landed first in a narrow rock gap, and helped him to get in. His issue is he feels not able to get his legs in and out of the cockpit in his kayak while the ass is still on the seat and needs the paddle bridge. Not good.
The beach was one of those steep cobble beaches which may get nasty in big seas and strong winds blowing onshore. The seas were low today, it is not spring tide yet, but the wind will pick up and the tide is rising the next days! We carefully selected our camp spots, camping on the beach on one of those cobble ledges should still be ok. Still Mike felt he can’t camp on the beach on the nice clean cobbles with his tent being blown away and leaking in the forecasted rain tomorrow, he wanted to go into the upland woods to find a spot where he could add a tarp to his tent. Well, those spots in the wood were in this *forest* very hard to find and deep inside. I liked to stay on the beach, as my Hilleberg Allak tent is rain- and quite gale proof once secured properly!
I leveled my camp spot, added rocks and logs to my tent pegs, and shoveled cobbles on all sides of the tent. I also dragged my kayak high up, and felt fine with my selection! Mike walked off with his tent utensils into the woods, after he unloaded his kayak and spread all his gear out besides it. Unfortunately I started already to rain and to blow even heavier with gusts up to 30 knots and more, and his gear started to fly around and to get wet. I was a good girl and shoveled everything back into his kayak in the rain, and jumped quickly back into my dry tent shelter!
Mike came running down to the beach as soon he realized in his sheltered forest it is obviously raining and blowing strong now. He dragged up his kayak, and collected his gear he wanted to take to his camp spot. Later, he opted to hang his food into the trees instead of leaving it in the kayak. His food bags are not odor proof as mine are. I had already fell asleep on an afternoon nap! He better approaches my tent spot with calling:”I’m not a bear!” as I was sitting bolt upright wondering who or what may be walking on the cobbles around my tent?
The tide was raising to highest level at 9.20 pm, but already at 7 pm I decided my cobble ledge may not be good enough with the wind blowing the waves up…? Better moving now when there is still time and light than later or tomorrow…? I should have taken the highest and not the nicest spot! I quickly packed my gear back into two bags, one I carried to the new site, the other stayed as weight inside the tent. Who knows about the gusts…
The moving went quick and smooth in rain and strong wind, but I did not need to take my tent down. The new site just had the issue it was so small that the ends of my tent were hanging down, leaving not much headroom. Not great for sitting, but good enough for sleeping! I also dragged both our kayaks up higher, I did not trust the spot!
I just got the fore cast in for Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the calm days are over, Sunday will be off, Monday maybe also if it does not change, Tuesday has north and west winds, hopefully not too strong… paddling life can’t be so easy all the time as it has been the last five days!

by Freya at May 22, 2017 02:18 am

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

I am the new guy


1

by Emil at May 22, 2017 02:17 am

May 21, 2017

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sat 20-2017 Day 57

Pos: 54.7266,-132.2045 Loc: Little Brownson Bay Acc: tent Dist: 25,4 km Start: 05:50 End: 11:05
Quite a day! Mike kept the big fire going over night, and no new bear tracks were running around our tent. I woke the man early to give him more than half an hour head start to pack, and actually fell asleep again, thank goodness. We got better in being ready packed together in time, but next day it has to be a full hour. But no worries, I wait for him on shore, and he does wait for me on the water! Well, mostly. 🙂
We had a beautiful calm morning as the other days, but Karel fore casted stronger southerlies 14-18 knots for the afternoon, still dry. And for Sunday, 20-30 knots SE, with rain. Ok, time to still paddle at least more than half a day!
The wildlife was lush this morning: We started off right after launching with about a dozen whales in various distances, with spouts everywhere and some guys breaching and diving down with displaying their big tail fluke. If that would be not enough, I guessed it it time now again for bears on this big island? Sure! I spotted a black spot on already the next beach a beach, but didn’t think it was one, as it was not moving. Mike was soon recognizing as *really* being a bear, and we paddled quickly up closer to the beach to watch him better digging between the rocks for food. Nice! At some point I started talking to the guy, to make him showing more than his fat behind. He slowly turned around, sniffed into the air, tried to see us, but didn’t really felt threatened and slowly kept on going with his business, and walked upland at some point. Nice pictures!
We paddled around the small headland to the next beach, and spotted him again – or was it another one? And another one? And another one? Thee black bears at one beach! Must have been mom and two youngsters, we assumed. Better stay in the kayak… 🙂
The next show of wildlife were some single seals in the water, a fat lonely sea lion on a rock, and many many sea otters floating around in the kelp behind the Narrows of Bean Island on their backs with their cute fluffy babys on their bellys. They are so cute!
To top everything off, about thirty eagles at the next headland were soaring in the air. Not bad wildlife day, we just missed the wolves!
There were three corners with tide rips marked on my chart: The south eastern headland of the big Prince of Wales Island at Cape Chacon was dead calm in the morning. we sneaked through the narrows of Bean Island and missed the rips at Nunez Point (if there were some…), but the real nasty looking headland was the area until surf point, with big black rock walls piling up upfront huge mountains. Still quite calm wind, though blowing off the mountains instead of southerlies as it should be. This changed very quickly, once we crossed the first bay which had a small sandy beach. Mike paddled close into it to have a look, I opted to cross in some rather nasty gusts off the mountains. Hmmmmmm…..how would be the next bay? It also should have a beach with landing options according to my satellite image view. Nothing to land really past this one, besides a tombolo on an island in about 20 km…
And now the wind came from SE as forecasted, and quite gusty with well over 20 knots! It was literally taking away from us the decision to land or not – it was high time to go to shore! The beach was at that time of the tide ok to land with kelp in a calmer corner and small cobbles, still Mike was a bit reluctant to damage his boat. Hey man, we didn’t ave any other option and we *need* to go in! Here! Now! I quickly landed first in a narrow rock gap, and helped him to get in. His issue is he feels not able to get his legs in and out of the cockpit in his kayak while the ass is still on the seat and needs the paddle bridge. Not good.
The beach was one of those steep cobble beaches which may get nasty in big seas and strong winds blowing onshore. The seas were low today, it is not spring tide yet, but the wind will pick up and the tide is rising the next days! We carefully selected our camp spots, camping on the beach on one of those cobble ledges should still be ok. Still Mike felt he can’t camp on the beach on the nice clean cobbles with his tent being blown away and leaking in the forecasted rain tomorrow, he wanted to go into the upland woods to find a spot where he could add a tarp to his tent. Well, those spots in the wood were in this *forest* very hard to find and deep inside. I liked to stay on the beach, as my Hilleberg Allak tent is rain- and quite gale proof once secured properly!
I leveled my camp spot, added rocks and logs to my tent pegs, and shoveled cobbles on all sides of the tent. I also dragged my kayak high up, and felt fine with my selection! Mike walked off with his tent utensils into the woods, after he unloaded his kayak and spread all his gear out besides it. Unfortunately i started already to rain and to blow even heavier with gusts up to 30 knots and more, and his gear started to fly around and to get wet. I was a good girl and shoveled everything back into his kayak in the rain, and jumped quickly back into my dry tent shelter!
Mike came running down to the beach as soon he realized in his sheltered forest it is obviously raining and blowing strong now. He dragged up his kayak, and collected his gear he wanted to take to his camp spot. Later, he opted to hang his food into the trees instead of leaving it in the kayak. His food bags are not odor proof as mine are. I had already fell asleep on an afternoon nap! He better approaches my tent spot with calling:” I’m not a bear!” as I was sitting bolt upright wondering who or what may be walking on the cobbles around my tent?
The tide was raising to highest level at 9.20 pm, but already at 7 pm I decided my cobble ledge may not be good enough with the wind blowing the waves up…? Better moving now when there is still time and light than later or tomorrow…? I should have taken the highest and not the nicest spot! I quickly packed my gear back into two bags, one I carried to the new site, the other stayed as weight inside the tent. Who knows about the gusts…
The moving went quick and smooth in rain and strong wind, but I did not need to take my tent down. The new site just had the issue it was so small that the ends of my tent were hanging down, leaving not much headroom. Not great for sitting, but good enough for sleeping! I also dragged both our kayaks up higher, I did not trust the spot!
I just got the fore cast in for Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the calm days are over, Sunday will be off, Monday maybe also if it does not change, Tuesday has north and west winds, hopefully not too strong… paddling life can’t be so easy all the time as it has been the last five days!

by Freya at May 21, 2017 04:59 am

May 20, 2017

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Goings-on at the club today, plus other people's flowers

Busy day out there - I just ran out to do an apres-heat-wave/pre-vacation check on my garden (everything looks good although I may plant more beets when I get back, I used a pretty old seed pack and not many germinated), but it's great to see things ramping up for the season. Trip leaders were being trained (I would've gone for that if I hadn't had a million things to do before vacation, that's always fun and a brush-up never hurts), there was work being done on the Point Comfort club workboat that is the impressive first endeavor of the Boatbuilding Committee, and the trailer for that boat has arrived, and the Staten Island camping trip folks had launched early in the morning (ok that is also tons of fun so maybe I would've been doing that if I wasn't travelling!). Here are some photos of those (well, except the camping trip people who were probably halfway to Staten Island by the time I was at the club) plus flowers from other people's gardens that I walked by while I was doing my other errands. Iris season!

by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 20, 2017 11:24 pm

SimonWillis.net
Triathlon, cycling, sea kayaking, swimming and life in the Scottish Highlands

Ironman 70.3 Edinburgh Bike Course Recce

All three courses, swim bike and run, on the Edinburgh Ironman 70.3 have changed since the original maps were posted at the launch of this event.  We're told the final routes are in place but no-one can be certain.

I ran the run route (the old run route!) back in January.  The new iteration is not so different as to give me many concerns, but I will walk it before the event.

However, the swim and the bike are on routes mostly new to me, so a recce was always going to be valuable.  I hope you'll find the info useful too.


Arthur's Seat quickly reached
From a Facebook group for competitors I learnt I would not be able to ride the race bike route in two places because

 a) a private road will be used for a short section at 46.2 miles and

b) the end of the bike route at 54miles would mean cycling the wrong way, against the one-way, traffic coming around Arthur's Seat.

That's the big hill in the centre of the city at the base of which the expo, finish and run will take place.

If you wish to ride the bike route in advance - highly recommended -there are two easy diversions for those above problems.  You can read the details on the Facebook group or just download and follow my .GPX or .TCX track.  I went slightly wrong once, clearly visible at 11 miles, but only for 20ft and was quickly back on course.

The overal impression of the route is one through rolling farmland.

It starts flat on the coast and ends in the city, but between the two it's fields fields fields.  There were no long hills to slowly crank up for ages.  There were lots of short, sometimes very steep hills where the route dropped into a stream valley and had to climb out the other side.

Frequent potholes on descents
The road surface is moderately good with sections that are pretty poor.

Quite a few stretches of road are not smooth but chunky, rough tarmac that's very draggy on a bike.

Almost every descent cannot be taken on tri-bars because there's a 'surprise' part way down; a pothole (crater in some cases), a torn section of road surface, a sudden turn in the course or, in one case, a stop sign and major road to cross.

Whenever heading into a tree-covered corridor descent, or one were you can't see the exit, I'm going to play safe.

The 'toughest' bit for me, certainly the most technical, is the loop out of Gifford.  It starts with a  climb and there's lots of the aforementioned hazards right up until you drop back down to Gifford again.  The excellent Lanterne Rouge cafe is well worth a coffee stop if you're doing the recce.

Really?  This is the route?
Riding back into the city you can see the finish from quite a distance, because Arthur's Seat is such a distinctive landmark.

Initially it looks like it'll take ages to reach, but you get to the bottom surprisingly fast.

Curiously, this involved a leg through a housing estate including a pedestrian area with offset railings designed to slow cycles!

Edit: I'm told (via Facebook) that the railings will be removed and ramps put in place to cope with the curbs.

I rode a slow recce on my winter bike and on race day will definitely use a tri bike.  However, I will put on a bigger cassette to help with those short sharp rises.  I did my swim after my ride and it was fine.

The swim and bike routes did feel quite exposed to wind, especially from the North to Easterly quarter.  That would give a choppy swim and a tough initial part to the bike.  That said, since most of the route is in a westerly direction, it will probably even out.

by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 08:28 pm

Virus Affects Endurance Athletes

SLOW
"I have had this conversation with eight of the athletes I coach",  Joe Beer told me.  "It's rife. I've never known anything quite like it".

My local Doctor pretty much confirmed Joe's anecdotal observations.  "We've seen several types of Glandular Fever going around recently", she said, "you might have one of those."

[Edit: I'm delighted to say that as of 13th May I seem to be all clear.  The blood test was negative, my power has returned and the sore throat faded.  Back to training for IM70.3 Staffs and Edinburgh].

Thank goodness for my training diary.  I've been riding less than two hours at a time because of a persistent cough, sore throat and occasional tiredness bordering on lethargy.

I thought had been with me for two weeks.  My diary revealed I'd first commented on it two months ago.  It would go away for a few days, I'd be able to train hard, then it snuck back again.  On-off, in-out, hokey-cokey symptoms.  Add to this some weird joint pains, like incredibly aching thumbs (yes, thumbs!) and I decided to go to our GP.  Bloods were taken and I'll know more next week.

Joe pointed out my symptoms sounded similar to those of Mark Cavendish.  His team doesn't know when he'll be back racing and he might miss this year's Tour de France.

I mention all this, not to bore you with my illness, but because other folk might not realise this is something they can't just 'push through'.

As endurance athletes, we usually manage to put mind over matter.  But if this virus has you in its grip, pushing through might be exactly the worst thing you can try.  With this in mind, I've sought and been granted a deferment for my first race which is scheduled in just two weeks.  That was a 'C' race. The B and A races are looming.

by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 10:27 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 19/05-2017 Day 56

Pos: 54.7523,-132.0083 Loc: Stone Rock Bay Acc: tent Dist: 50,8 km Start: 06:10 End: 15:10 (Alaska Time) It was a perfect forecast for the big crossing day – lowest winds 1-3 knots from all sides until noon, then low headwinds up to 12 knots. I should have just got up when I woke at first daylight at 3.45 am resp. have kicked my paddling partner out of bed then…I gave Mike half an hour head start when I eventually really woke up at 4.45 am, but I still managed to wait 20 min sitting ready to go. No big deal, we just would have to work a bit harder in the sfternoon on our 50 km crossing! I have never had such a smooth water on a big crossing all morning until noon, it was dead calm to oily, with best visibilty from coast to coast. We made great speed, on those conditions our long line kayaks really glide smoothly along, and the weight difference does not play up badly for me that much. Mike has also good endurance and is developing a good technique at speed. He is a nice challenging paddling partner for me! Mike eventually saw the joy of paddling without this stupid harness (PFD…), and joined me on my “topless style” in these conditions with pleasure. Some fat offshore rocks, the West Rocks, showed up to the left, after we had already spotted a bunch of curious sea lions popping up behind us. West Rocks were obviously a home of a large sea lion colony, we haéard them barking and grunting from far distance on these calm seas. What a nature life! Our speed rush got interrupted by a bunch of strong whale blows to the north. Many different guys, one with displaying the beautiful fin on diving. We guessed those must have been three whales! On was spouting quite behind us, and showing a long pretty back line. So nice! They kept on playing and spouting in the distance for a long while. Noah’s Arch was passing by, loaded with four sea gulls. They were quite unshy, and stayed on their big log for a long while. When they flew off, I dropped them a piece of cookie on their floating island. Hope they appreciate it! Last but not least, a swarm of small dolphins kept us entertained. A crossing of it’s finest! Including the headwind for the last three hours with light choppy seas…a bit harder work we could have avoided by getting up earlier. My way point for the sandy beach I saw on the satellite images stayed longtime hidden behind a headland, and we already guessed this must be another, not really inviting beach to the left. But incorrect! We got once more a lovely sheltered, white sandy beach for this night, a perfect finish of a great crossing! It had a nice decorative bear paw track. Mike was not happy to stay, but what were the options? Nothing really! We opted to stay, and took precautions. A carried my spray all the time visiting the river on the neighbor beach for a hair wash and investigating the open upland. Before, I had my dip in the chilly crystal clear Ocean of Alaska. Mike decided to hang his food into a tree, and enjoys to keep a large fire going probably all night. I don’t mind!

by Freya at May 20, 2017 05:19 am

Océanos de Libertad

Comenzamos la temporada de cursos. verano 2017

P1130773
Reembarcar es divertido...pero en situación real si no sabemos, la cara sería otra.

P1130815
La base de Nordeskayak en Limens, es un entorno idóneo.
P1130848
Aprender a desembarcar y colaborar con el grupo.
Se va acercando la temporada fuerte de nuestro deporte, y las temperaturas van siendo nuestras aliadas para la práctica de los deportes acuáticos, si bien el kayak es un deporte que podemos practicar en cualquier época del año; siempre y cuando estemos correctamente equipados. Si es vuestra primera toma de contacto, no me cansaré de decir lo mismo; es importantísimo formarnos. En la península hay un buen número de profesionales que te van a enseñar la técnica correcta de paleo, navegación  y las maniobras de seguridad, etc...¡Acude  a ellos!

Estamos preparando nuestra escuela, aquí podéis encontrarnos:
Escuela Kayak de Mar Illas Atlánticas.

Club Nordeskayak

Madridsports.eu

Cursos en Limens, Islas Cies, Madrid, Huelva, Asturias, ...y en breve Aldán.

WE SPEAK ENGLISH!!

P1140082
Rock gardening
P1140115

P1140141

Una ruta en el mar puede ser como dice mi amigo Miguel, "Un paseo bucólico pastoril" y en cuestión de mínutos convertirse en una pesadilla.
Hoy en día para muchos la figura de un entrenador personal no es algo extraño, o el aprender a esquiar con un profesor, conseguimos reducir el riesgo de lesiones, y la curva de aprendizaje es más eficaz, efectiva y rápida; pues evitamos afianzar errores. .

P1130929
Aurorescates.

Nosotros por nuestra parte estamos ya preparando la temporada de formación que más se ajuste a tus necesidades.  Para aquellos que se estén planteando realizar alguna ruta por nuestras costas, y no tengan experiencia previa, os recomiendo contratéis un guia.  Hay grupos que sin experiencia en kayak deciden realizar una ruta de varios días. Mi consejo: prepararos física, tecnica y mentalmente y a ser posible no vayais sin un guía.

P1140175

P1140184

P1140189


https://youtu.be/FGDEQsWgOtg
 

by Jorge López (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2017 03:37 am

May 19, 2017

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

Cuil camping

This the first of two catch-up posts from a camping trip Allan and I made on Loch Linnhe in the second half of April.  The plan was for a relaxed circuit and a couple of nights wild camping; for both of us it was the first overnight trip of the year due to work or health reasons.  A bigger trip was in the planning so this would also be a good shake-out of camping kit.




Our starting point was Cuil Bay on the eastern shore of Loch Linnhe, where a couple of cars can be parked by the side of the minor road above the shore - taking care to leave access for farm vehicles.  Cuil translates as either "wing" or "back", both of which would be good descriptions for the shape of the bay.

The weather looked good with sunshine and cloud dappling the long view down the loch towards the distant Mull hills.






We paddled south down the loch in perfect conditions, enjoying the reflections of the Morvern hills on the mirror calm water.  To our left the main A828 road follows the shore for several kilometres and there was some traffic noise, but this soon fades when the road turns inland a little.






We took luncheon on a tiny pebble beach at the north tip of Shuna (the northerly of two islands with the same name in this area, the other being in the Firth of Lorn).  The sunlight was picking out the colours of the pebbles below the water beautifully - it really was a very relaxing spot.  Looking over the loch to Morvern, I recalled one of our trips from the previous year when we'd paddled around Movern in late summer warmth.  Loch Linnhe seems to be overlooked a bit by sea kayakers, but it does have the potential for good trips.






After paddling around the outside of Shuna, our next stop was at the ferry jetty on Lismore.  There's a toilet and water from a tap at the ferry waiting room here, handy on longer trips.  We now had a decision to make....our plan was very flexible and we'd not planned in any more detail than a starting point and a basic direction down the loch.  From the jetty we could paddle down either side of the island of Lismore (Lios Mor - the big garden, so named for the fertility of the island which is on limestone).





We chose to go down the outside, west, side of the island as it has plenty of interest and a few more camping options.  Within 30 minutes of setting out, a stiff NW'ly breeze blew up and made things quite bouncy - it seemed we'd made the wrong choice!

A considerable chop built up as we passed beneath the ruin of Castle Coeffin.  Built in the 13th century by the MacDougalls of Lorn, the castle passed into ownership of Clan Stewart through marriage and eventually to Clan Campbell.





We were glad of the opportunity to tuck into the bay below the castle for a breather out of the wind.  This bay must have been a factor in the siting of the castle as the MacDougalls were a clan of sea raiders, the beach must have been a perfect base for operating the highland version of a longship - the Birlinn.






The bay also contains the well-preserved remains of a medieval fish trap.  The fish were held back as the tide dropped and could be caught easily in the confines of the trap. 

We considered making our first camp on the cropped turf below the castle, but a reasonably polite notice asks that folk don't camp here as it's close to the croft house and is grazed occasionally by horses.  We had a quick look at the map and decided to backtrack on our route a bit to a spot we'd noticed earlier.






It was a fairly stiff paddle back up against a strengthening wind to reach the spot we had in mind, but it was worthwhile as it was a good place to camp with a little shelter from what had become a cold NW'ly wind - a "Cuil" breeze in fact!





After dinner we managed to find a spot for a campfire below the high water line and enjoyed a dram or two to mark the first kayak camp of the year.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2017 08:10 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

GLID

Inte så bra! I stort sett alla skruvar i skrovet är i dåligt skick. Även hela däcket måste bytas då det är så försvagat av ålder och delvis är en virket murket. Många delar visade sig sitta lösa eller dåligt fast pågrund de dåliga skruvarna. Inser att detta kommer att ta tid. 

by Bengt Larsson at May 19, 2017 06:38 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Runt Tjärö med Grimslöv

Måndag till tisdag tillbringades runt och på Tjärö i Blekinge, det var dax att inspirera lite folkhögskoleelever till att bli kajakfrälsta. Ja, eller i alla fall tycka att det inte var så himla dumt det där med paddling och tältning i skärgård 🙂 Strålande solsken, svag vind och 19 grader inledde måndagen. Oväntat och välkommet...

Inlägget Runt Tjärö med Grimslöv dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Pia Sjöstedt at May 19, 2017 08:26 am

NORCAL YAK
Northern California kayaking adventures

Don’t allow a rattle to disrupt your next paddle

Snakes have gotten a bad rap since that incident in Eden... At the aptly-named Rattlesnake Bar near Folsom Lake (2015) ….and there are already a number of rattlesnake bite stories around...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2017 08:09 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Thu 18/05-2017 Day 55

Pos: 54.8669,-131.2680 Loc: Kelp Island Acc: tent Dist: 39,8 km Start: 07:00 End: 14:10 (Canadian Time)
It was a perfect fore cast for crossing 40 km over to Kelp Island! Southern winds 5-15 knots, seas 1 m. Mike was feeling fine with this plan, and I felt confident he would have no problem either. Out of our islands, a school of small dolphins were pleasing our eye for a while. The destination was well visible, though hiding temporary in clouds.
Sure as it goes on bigger crossings, the middle section proves to be the toughest with stronger wind and waves, but nothing to worry about – at least not for me. Mike felt a bit more apprehensive about how much further wind and waves might develop, but I calmed him this would be the “worst” section, it could only get better from nww! He was riding absolutely safely those wind waves from left behind, with the occasional soft break on top. Still, he wished me to be paddling faster and getting across together quicker! 🙂 I was paddling my steady moderate pace, just like a locomotive, not in any way worried about the two of us.
Already in calmer water and wind again getting closer to kelp Island, a whale was spouting not too far in front of us about 6 times, before he was diving down with displaying is pretty tail. Nice!
About 2 km before Kelp Island, our so far nice following current turned around, and we felt it would be better to turn to the right of a small reef upfront Kelp Island. Only one more kilometer against strong current until we could turn into our destination bay for tonight! This was a shallow sandy beach, but black and not too attractive looking. Well, the times of the pretty white beaches might be over for now, one can’t be too picky any more! All good. It was still not spring tide, or we better would not have put up right on the top of the sand. There was one nice tent site also on top of a green meadow, which amazingly was neither wet nor having rocks like those inlet meadows usually all are. But at the beach was right fine now. We just had to do a long carry up te very shallow inlet beach, as we were landing relatively early for the day- But 40 km on on open crossing were enough for now!
The sun came out, and we spent the afternoon beach combing. A mink family was busy running and swimming up and down the beach, really cute! Life could be worse!

by Freya at May 19, 2017 01:24 am

May 18, 2017

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 18th - Cadboro Bay (again) - (#34)

I went for a quick after dinner paddle with Mark and Paul so that Paul could test out different skin-on-frame kayaks. I had to come back early, but he tried out my Cape Falcon  F1 and the Disko bay.
The Disko bay is a pretty kayak! :)
click to enlarge
1 km, YTD 302 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 18, 2017 08:54 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

A Small Peak at the Ghosts of Puget Sound

American Bald Eagle

Puget Sound’s 1,330 miles of shoreline are criss crossed with miles of Interstate Highways, and secondary roads. Within a few hours you can be from one end to the other. That hasn’t always been the case. In fact for the majority of it’s history the waterways were the fastest, most convenient way to transit the […]

The post A Small Peak at the Ghosts of Puget Sound appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

by Steve Weileman at May 18, 2017 05:38 pm

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 16th - Cadboro Bay (#32)

Pete and I took a group of 7 grade 10 students to Cadboro Bay to do an intro session on sea kayaking, wet exits and rescues. We are taking this group for a 6 day trip to the Broughtons in June. They look like they should be fine!
click to enlarge
3 km, YTD 296 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 18, 2017 12:13 pm

May 18th - Cadboro Bay (#33)

I went for a morning paddle on the Oarboard Adventure SUP. Conditions were nice and calm and it was fun being back on a SUP. I notice that paddling on my left side seems to track much better than on my right... not sure why. You can see the track is much more wiggly that my kayak tracks and my average speed quite a bit lower - 5.1 kph instead of 6 to 7 kph...
click to enlarge
5 km, YTD 301 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 18, 2017 12:13 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Skidsäsongen 2016/2017

Äntligen en skidsäsong där vi kom över skamgränsen på antalet skiddagar 🙂 Började med nio finfina skiddagar precis innan julträngseln. Betydligt mer snö än förra julrundan. Perfekt. Både fullmåneskidåkning och pannlampedräll. Sen drog skidsäsongen igång på hemmafronten i början av januari. Vi hann med skapligt med rundor på Vallåsen som ligger endast 15-20 minuter hemifrån....

Inlägget Skidsäsongen 2016/2017 dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 18, 2017 07:06 am

Newfoundland Sea Kayaking
"Some things were made for one thing, for me, that one thing is the Sea" Hey Ocean!

Belize Trip - Day #1 Tobacco Caye to Water Caye




We were eager to get going on our way, so as soon as we had our boats packed, we hit the water to head west to Tobacco Range to do some exploring.


A scan of the area from British Admiralty Charte #1797

Our route for day #1
Tobacco Caye Paradise. You can camp here for $10 per person/per night
Or you can rent one of these for $35 per person/per night. Not bad!
Heading to Tobacco Range
You can see a stand of palm trees on Tobacco Range, which is the only place to camp on this island. You could camp here for free from what I understand, but it didn't look like the nicest place in the world to camp. Also, there are lots of mangroves in this area, meaning lots of bugs, which could make for an unpleasant night if there is no wind.

Landing to check out the island
Me trying to break open a coconut. The entire trip Rob was determined to get a good coconut, which proved to be easier said than done!
Heading south on the western side of the range
Fishing shacks on Tobacco Range
After exploring Tobacco Range we decided to head towards Water Caye to camp for the night. instead of just heading straight for it, we paddled back over to the reef and followed along side it the whole way south. You can hear the constant roar of waves breaking against the reef, it is amazing the shelter that it provides. Don't be tempted to get out of your boat and walk on the reef, that is strictly forbidden and carries a pretty hefty fine if you are caught.

The Belize Barrier Reef
Water Caye
On Water Caye, we camped at Rick's place, which I believe is called Bamboo Camp. Rick is from New Jersey originally, but his mother was from Belize. He left the chaos of the US to live on and island in the Caribbean. Not a bad idea! Rick and his family were very friendly and helpful. Camping there is $20 per person/per night.

The beach at Rick's place. We arrived just as the sun was going down
Rick's house. You can see the cisterns used for storing rainwater, and the shower setup on the right
Ricks 'Living Room', and his dog

Our campground
Not bad!
Sunset on day #1. We spent the evening on the dock sipping rum and planning the next days snorkeling.


by Brian Newhook (noreply@blogger.com) at May 18, 2017 07:52 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Wed 17/05-2017 Day 54

Pos: 54.6399,-130.8333 Loc: Gnarled Islands Acc: tent Dist: 42,7 km Start: 07:30 End: 16:20
It was a foggy morning start, but the sun came out pretty soon and stayed with a cloud mixture all day. Not a single raindrop! We have agreed to go outside Dundas Island, the seas were low, the light wind was in the back, it cant be better. This promised to be much more interesting than paddling the eastern side. A handful of headlands proved to be still pretty rough, but all good. Mike was comfortable paddling here, and where he might have doubts, he followed me in my wake. In general, I have good confidence he could handle more big seas than he had already experienced on his other trips.
We swapped paddles around for testing, and had a small “surf run” on a quite windy corner. Both kayaks behave quite similar in following seas, both have rudders, one is just more heavy loaded and the other propelled by a stronger man, so no doubt about who won the “small competition” 🙂
There was a site marked on my chart called “Boat Harbor”, where there were supposed to be some indigenous old houses, surely of some interest to have alook. When we arrived in the nice sheltered sandy bay, the whole site did not look abandoned at all, but five youngsters and a dog were playing at the beach, and a mom was busy around the house. One larger fishing boot was moored out at a floating dock, and the other one we saw just an hour ago with a skiff buzzing around probably belonged to the same place.
We slowly approached, but it id feel pretty much private here! The kids came down to the beach for a chat, and they confirmed to us they were there only for the month of May to collect clams, abalones and sea weed. When we turned away without landing to have a break on some other beach, a motorboat with a First Nation man and women rounded the beach before, just like to show us we were better not tempted to stay here. The women on purpose looked to the other side on passing, the man just about replied my greeting hand sign. We only filled our water bags and aimed for Gnarled Island as planned.
Another white sandy shell beach was waiting for us in some sunshine! A perfect luxury padding day. The campsite on the top end on sand was in the shade though, and after my dip in the crystal clear ocean I rather opted for the warm camp clothing version. I will have to sleep earlier this evening, not writing and sending my updates out that late as last night. So enough form today!

by Freya at May 18, 2017 03:56 am

May 17, 2017

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Current and prior pieces at the Houston Bowery Art Wall


As long as I'm on the topic of good public art in NYC, here are a few shots from the Houston Bowery Art Wall, which I enjoy passing by on my way to my Tuesday night Irish music sessions. This is a rotating mural space supported by the space's owner, Goldman Properties. I didn't actually know the history until I did a little googling - turns out that the first mural here was done in the early 80's by Keith Haring and Juan Dubose. In 2008, the developer, who was an art fan, turned the space over to a curator who re-created the original mural in honor of what would have been Haring's 50th birthday. I remember that one, I don't know enough about art to tell you what it meant but it was vibrant and lively and so much fun to look at.

That was up for a while, and then after that a series of street artists have been invited to use the space for a period of a few months each. I've enjoyed watching the pieces go up, but besides the Haring re-creation, the current one and the last one have been my favorites so far. The current one is by PichiAvo, two artists from Spain who like to combine classical art with graffiti. Their gigantic young Poseidon with his charging white horses set against a colorful street art backdrop is a glorious thing to see. The one before that was a downtown street scene by Logan Hicks that was just mesmerizing in its photographic detail, and when I started looking into it for this post, I was amazed to find out that the artist created it using STENCILS, five layers, one layer a day. Incredible, I wish I'd managed to get over there some time when he was actually working on it!

The general history here was lifted from the Atlas Obscura's article about the wall (which includes a photo of the Haring mural for your enjoyment); for lots more about the murals themselves (including the ups and downs of creation), check out the Graffiti Wall Archives at Bowery Boogie. That's it for the writing, click on any of the pictures for a slideshow view.


by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 17, 2017 10:07 pm

Paddle Making (and other canoe stuff)
Functional paddle art and other canoe related ramblings

Son's New Paddle

Years ago, paddle maker Craig Johnson sent a gift of a short board of Sassafras along with the 3 boards I purchased from him. It was the perfect size to make a kid's paddle.

5/4 Sassafras Stock

Well I finally finished working on that new paddle for my 8 year old son. It's a 48" beavertail with a long skinny grip.

48" Sassafras Beavertail


For decoration, I was inspired by the sketch of a vine motif on an elongated grip documented in  La culture matérielle des indiens de Weymontachie by Norman Clermont (see that post HERE).

La culture matérielle des indiens de Weymontachie 
Norman Clermont (‎1982)


My boy approved of the grip decoration but also wanted a large letter K for his initial on the blade. This worked out well because by the time he outgrows this paddle as a user, it should fit little brother well and they have the same initial. Also added some other floral decorations on the upper blade.

Decorated Side


I rushed a bit to get this done in time for an upcoming 2 night canoe trip over the May long weeknd. The father of a classmate saw our trip report from last summer and invited us along for their family adventure. Another party is joining us too so we'll have a total of 3 dads and 5 kids.  A no portage base-camp experience has been planned so we'll be bringing along some extra weight including the wanigan, bucksaw chair, homemade pack, chess-set and the bushcraft toys made over the winter.


Camping & Bushcraft Toys



Paddling Chess-set


Given how we're playing it safe and camping close to the put-in, I'm planning on bringing the repaired Sassafras Tripper for a trial on the lake. We'll see if the repair holds up or if the paddle will be relegated to a garden ornament again.

by Murat (noreply@blogger.com) at May 17, 2017 10:57 am

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Olympus Tough TG-5

Olympus kommer med en modell i sin Tough-serie som är deras vattentäta och extra tåliga kameraserie. Tough TG-5 heter senaste tillskottet. Ännu tåligare än föregångaren säger de, ska tålas att tappas från drygt 2 meter och klara vattendjup ner till 15m. De har även minskat antalet pixlar från 16 till 12 Megapixel. Det senare gör...

Inlägget Olympus Tough TG-5 dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 17, 2017 08:50 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Tue 16/05-2017 Day 53

Pos: 54.3967,-130.8162 Loc: Island 42 Acc: tent Dist: 39,9 km Start: 07:00 End: 15:45
Yeah! My updates are now coming again daily, as I made obviously this Optimizer device working in Prince Rupert. Still, it takes about an hour off my evening recovery time to write those, which is quite noticeable for a tired kayaker.
John picked me up from Sheila and Greg’s house early in the morning, perfectly in time at 5.30 am as agreed. Thanks for giving me you new RB&B site, Sheila and Greg! Mike was driving down to the water himself at actually a different launch place where he could already load his boat from the car and wheel it down. We met at the Yachtclub as agreed, and both waved John off at 7 am. Thank you so much, John, to take so much generous care abut both of us! He even took Friday and Monday off work to do so. Not many people would do…
having Mike now as a new paddling partner besides me felt different, but very good. He looked confident in his slim QCC 700 kayak, and obviously also fitted all his gear inside the similar long but less volume kayak, and not strapping any deckload. Stll, my kayak was maybe 20 kg heavier than his. I carried all those batteries, a shitload of fresh fruit and am obviously also a packing genious to fit the maximum load into the available volume 🙂
We had a short play around an anchored tanker sitting silently and unloaded high up on the water. What a gigantic metal wall…I was close to paddle through the arch under it’s stern rudder, but as the ship was unloaded, the propeller was visible over the water line and it did not look really inviting to maybe get shredded there, in case they start the machine for some reason…?
Mike was unfortunately in vain searching for some ancient rock carvings right across the ferry bridge form Digby Island. It would have been nice to have had a precise way point!
It was calm water and wind, though fore casted to breeze up to 10-15 knots first north, then west. Not a fully easy crossing to Melville Island, but doable for me being maybe more experienced and Mike being maybe more strong. The swells were barely noticeable, which came handy when we paddled close to rocks and through some mszes of islands. Mike was not so much used to slip through rocks and paddling in rock gardens in general, but I told him just stay right behind me and he’ll be fine. He realize pretty soon there are usually clean lines between rocks on the path I am picking, and when I felt fine paddling “topless” through those, then there is really nothing to worry about!
We had been stopping prior to getting out in the unprotected side on a beautiful sandy islet tombolo, and climbed the top of the islet to have a look. What a view on that bright sunny day! Many white sandy beaches were lurking every where, but I was aiming for “the” best in this area. A white sandy beach with white shells, sunny, fully sheltered, and with some open hinterland forest.
Amazingly, Mike opted to put up his ten on the clean, but not sunny upland site, where as I *loved* to camp right down on the sunny beach on the white sand. We don’t get that many sunshine here! And this has been the best day of this year so far! I was warning Mike already in PR about I’d not care and still run around topless even when I’m not alone any more, and he was Man enough to stand that… 🙂 When my body is stuffed in a dry suit all that sunny day, it really yearn for some UV rays on the bare skin of the whole body! I also took a dip in the absolutely crystal clear water, but it was not moe than a short dip in freezing temperatures…
For cooking, Mike built a small fire for his pot, I opted to still use my gas stove for mine, I don’t like black pots. Maybe he just liked to show off to use his nice ax and saw he brought along – no chainsaw though, in a country where man power is measured by the length of the latter, hehehe…
Out of sudden, from the brightest sunshine, we were from one minute to the next covered in thick fog! A scary weather change! Well, we heard the howling buoys out there making noise all afternoon – and now the soup reached our paradise! It didn not last forever though, but my afternoon sun soak was a bit spoiled.
We then rather went for a walk. and Mike explained me a lot about the local biology. A climb on top of the tiny islet in a really nice open forest with huge trees and regained sunshine finished the lovely day with my new pleasant paddling partner. A good choice – or better good luck on my “blind date”?

by Freya at May 17, 2017 06:02 am

May 16, 2017

Travels with Paddles
a sea kayaking journal

Anglesey Sunset

My 'group tent' got shredded on Sunday night. Effectively the UV detoriation killed it after 6 seasons of 'base-camp' use. The windward side, buffeted by wind, was still holding on, but the whole front door flap was ripping all over the place. Kind of 'open plan' camping.

For the last two days I have been staying with Petr from Czech. He kindly offered me a place to sleep. A few years ago Petr built his own carbon/kevlar racing sea kayak in Prague. Put it in the water there and paddled all the way to Nordkapp and partly back; a 5000 km trip...

After dinner we drove the scenic coastal road back and took a small detour twards South Stack for this nice sunset picture.

Now it is packing-up and driving back to the Netherlands via Hull ferry. Hope to be back soon!

by noreply@blogger.com (Axel) at May 16, 2017 08:00 pm

josebelloseakayaking

Enfilaciones

Como siempre que hablamos de navegación en kayak de mar, antes que nada, conviene tener claro que la señalización marítima (balizamiento etc) está diseñada para buques y embarcaciones en general mucho más grandes que las nuestras, y tienen como objeto la seguridad de las mismas.


Debemos conocer y manejar estas señales con soltura, pues también navegamos en esas aguas, pero en muchos casos (la mayoría) nuestra seguridad depende precisamente de no seguirlas. Esto es evidente, pues si esta señalización indica los pasos y rutas de grandes embarcaciones, ahí es donde no  debemos estar. 

Hoy hablamos de enfilaciones, que no son más que las líneas que se constituyen por la alineación de dos  elementos que son reconocibles en la carta náutica. Normalmente para la entrada en puertos, canales de navegación etc, encontramos indicada en la carta la enfilación correcta, marcando el rumbo exacto que seguimos si alineamos los dos objetos señalados, de esta manera los barcos están en aguas seguras.

En medio de la Bahía de Cádiz tenemos dos postes que indican la entrada exacta de la canal de navegación desde fuera de la Bahía, el primero es más bajo, de manera que si accedemos desde mar abierto, solo tenemos que orientar nuestro rumbo para alinear las señales coloreadas (una arriba y otra abajo) o las luces correspondientes, si es de noche. Estaremos justo sobre la línea que marca la carta.


Este tipo de enfilaciones son las llamadas "artificiales", pues se han construido expresamente con esta finalidad. También se marcan en la carta enfilaciones "naturales" aprovechando la existencia de dos elementos fácilmente reconocibles desde el agua (edificios, monumentos, antenas, montañas etc..), que nos sirven de igual manera.

 

Más interés tiene para nosotros utilizar esta sistemática para posicionarnos en nuestra navegación de cabotaje. El procedimiento es rápido, sencillo, y nos indica con exactitud nuestra posición en el  punto donde la linea que marca nuestra enfilación corta la ruta sobre la que vamos. Ya hemos visto por aquí otros posicionamientos, sin embargo este es muy simple y rápido.

by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at May 16, 2017 07:21 pm

Woman on Water
A woman's perspective on kayaking and outdoor adventures.

Eel River Mountains to the Sea - Day Two

Paddling a Loaded Kayak

Day two, we loaded our kayaks.  Packing food, clothes, and equipment to live out of a whitewater kayak for 8-10 days can be quite challenging.  As we packed and repacked, what was truely essential was determined.  Tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tarp, stove, cook pot, water filter, spare paddle, and an extra set of warm clothes were determined to be the essentials.  In any extra space, we squeezed in fresh fruit, beers, and tequila.  
The challenge of packing whitewater kayaks for 8-10 days in the wilderness. Photo by Jeff Laxier
As we launched on our second day, I realized that I had not packed my boat evenly and my boat was stern heavy.  It felt like I was riding a wheelie down the river.  Waves and boils seemed to be constantly grabbing my unbalanced boat and challenging my balance and bracing skills.  At the top of the most difficult rapid of the day, a wave capsized me.  As my kayak flipped upside down and my head dunked in the freezing cold water.  With my kayak stuffed full of what we needed to live for the next week, I knew that I had to roll my kayak up right.  With hundreds of rolls under my skirt, I went on autopilot and rolled my kayak upright.
Cate starting down Ramsing Rapid.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
We did about 13 miles of the 17 mile Hearst Run on our second day.  In my opinion, it is one of the most scenic stretches of the Eel River.  In the spring, wildflowers add color to the river banks and hillsides..
Lupines and Indian Paintbrush growing on rocks along the Eel River.  Photo by Cate Hawthorne
About a mile into the Hearst Run, the river constricts into a tight gorge.  Ramsing Rapid aka Ramsing Corner is a class III rapid at the beginning of the gorge.  At high flows both Ramsing's Rapid and the gorge often challenge kayakers with whirlpools and boiling eddylines.  The flow was pretty high on our trip (possibly 3,000 cfs).  I have to admit that I was relieved when we emerged from the gorge.
Hey Diddle Diddle, Down the Middle through the gorge section of the Eel.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
On emerging from the gorge, we came across a wild pig and her piglets
Wild sow and her piglets along the Eel River.   Photo by Jeff Laxier
Other wildlife that we saw included river otters, deer, bald eagles, and a bear.  We saw the bear when we were camped at Indian Creek.  We had just finished dinner and were enjoying a couple of beers when the bear sauntered out from a cluster of rocks on the hillside just up river from us.  He strolled along, hopped up on a log and bounced up and down on the log.  He hopped off and continued on his way up the ridge seemingly unconcerned about us.
Our camp on at Indian Creek.  We were sitting on the large rock when we saw the bear.  Photo by Jeff Laxier
This was a really nice day on the river.  It was sunny and 60 degrees with little to no wind.  We managed to fit everything into our kayaks that we needed and the two of us were off on a wilderness kayaking adventure on the Eel River.
Cate and Jeff preparing to launch at Hearst on the Eel River.  Photo by Jerry Albright




by Cate Hawthorne (noreply@blogger.com) at May 16, 2017 02:28 pm

Björn Thomasson Design
<div class="container"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <img class="logo img-responsive" src="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/img/lemoon-logo.png" alt="logo" /> <div class="lang"> <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-GB">English (UK)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=en-US">English (US)</a> | <a href="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx?_lang=sv-SE">Svenska</a> </div> </div> <form name="aspnetForm" method="post" action="http://www.thomassondesign.com/admin/install/default.aspx" id="aspnetForm"> <input type="hidden" name="lemoon.rooturl" id="lemoon.rooturl" value="/" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATE" id="__VIEWSTATE" value="ueMz1SfkeDfF0uDglAKg1IPmRXYzEdltLTioJQPF1bftv7L/MY7vlocYqr0nozgQE7w7s4YEB2Ce4NFr3XpA+yln17xueWGLb7Jxs0SlUaA=" /> <input type="hidden" name="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" id="__VIEWSTATEGENERATOR" value="1231C1A0" /> <input type="hidden" name="__EVENTVALIDATION" id="__EVENTVALIDATION" value="Ewbv/GCR8dth81dNUTL8ojkaN+/+0aNBXLbUdK8p2Ed/Cunu9KyOHRj8OkN5u7JZSjdgZK/4TJFc+qDo4ZGc5vIr4M6rM/2afoPFPQIDyW1ClzYSQYRzzO8fSlZ5pGOA" /> <fieldset class="form-horizontal"> <legend>Setup Lemoon</legend> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <p class="form-control-static"> Please verify that the following requirements have been met. </p> </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> <div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> <ul class="list-unstyled checks"> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Can open database connection </li> <li class="passed"> <i class="fa fa-check-circle"></i> Supported version of SQL Server </li> <li class="failed"> <i class="fa fa-ban"></i> Database is not empty <em>An empty database is required for setup to continue.</em> </li> </ul> <a id="ctl00_content_checkButton" class="btn btn-default" href="javascript:WebForm_DoPostBackWithOptions(new WebForm_PostBackOptions(">Check again</a> </div> </div> <div class="buttons form-horizontal"><div class="form-group"><div class="col-sm-10 col-sm-offset-2"> </div></div></div> </fieldset> </form> </div> <div class="alerts"></div>

Jubileumshelg i Danmark

I helgen fyller Kano og kajakverkstedet 50 år och firar med en 4 dagar fulla av kajakaktiviteter: erbjudanden, gratis kurser och föredrag. Här finns programmet.

Jag kommer att hålla fem kurser i paddelteknik med grönlandpaddel och ett föredrag om kajakdesign – med fokus på hur man som konstruktör balanserar snabbhet, stabilitet, sjösäkerhet, komfort mm till en ändamålsenlig mix (min senaste, Frej, finns att testa för den som vill uppleva resultatet av en ovanligt lyckad avvägning). Annat är två olika föredrag om att paddla Danmark runt av Carsten Rohde (29 dagar) och Neina Zenana (42 dagar) och om Nordvästpassagen i kajak av Tonni Frandsen. Kurser pågår hela dagarna och är kostnadsfria (en depositionsavgift vid förhandsanmälan återbetalas vid kursstart): introduktion  till havskajak, kandensarpaddling, paddla surfski, paddla turkajak, snabbpaddling med vingpaddel, lugnare paddling med grönlandspaddel, roll, långfärdsteknik mm. Petrus är på plats och visar hur man bygger kajak och Lars Gram visar hur en bra grönlandspaddel blir till. Dan Poulsen berättar om hur det gick till när sjöarna i området blev Danmarks kano-centrum och det kunde finnas flera tusen övernattningsbara kandensare ute under sommarhelgerna. Poul Nesgaard berättar om Kano og kajakverkstedets 50-åriga historia. Självklart finns hela sortimentet av kajaker och kandensare att prova – bland annat nya Frej Pro, som är byggd för att tåla allt. Har jag glömt något? Ja, fömodligen...

Om man graderar enligt Guide Micheline (matställen med en stjärna är värda ett besök, med två stjärnor är värda en omväg och med tre stjärnor är värda en resa) skulle jag nog säga ett detta är ett trestjärnigt arrangemang – åtminstone för paddlare i södra halvan av landet. Vik av en eller ett par dagar i Kongens Lyngby och i sjösystemen däromkring!.

Ladda ner programmet här.

by Björn Thomasson at May 16, 2017 12:41 pm

Newfoundland Sea Kayaking
"Some things were made for one thing, for me, that one thing is the Sea" Hey Ocean!

A Trip to Belize

In February, myself and two friends, Rob Scott and Rob Bertolo spent 11 days in Belize. 8 of those days we spent kayaking and snorkeling around the cayes off the coast of Dangriga, just south of Belize City. I've been meaning to post a trip report ever since we got back, but with so many pictures and things to say, its been a daunting task that I have been putting off. I think I will break it up into several posts, or I'll never get it done!


With WestJet offering a direct flight from Toronto to Belize City twice a week, it makes getting there from Canada cheaper and faster. From Belize City, we needed to get to Dangriga. We had the option of a 4 hour bus ride or a 15 minute flight with TropicAir, so we opted for the flight. Once we arrived in Dangriga, we checked in at Pal's Guesthouse and headed over to Island Expeditions (IE) to sort out our kayak rentals and find out where the market was. Leif at IE was super helpful with everything. Can't say enough good about the people at IE.

Pal's Guesthouse. The office in in the house across the street from it. Nice beachfront location!




We headed out to get some food and drink at Island Bar. Traditional Belizean fare, rice &beans with stewed chicken, covered in Marie Sharps hot sauce, washed down with a couple Belikan.
Belizean Food. It was delicious!


The two Robs




There is a shop close by called The Price Is Right, and they have pretty much everything you could need, including booze. I highly recommend you buy double the amount of rum you think you will need, we ran out of our supply a little too early.

Dangriga is a working town of about 10,000. There is almost no tourist infrastructure, which was kind of interesting to see. There are no franchises, except a bank. You couldn't find so much as a refrigerator magnet in any of the shops, which are mostly located on the main drag of the town, near the bridge. The shops are usually open until 8pm, which is nice if you arrive late. The good folks at IE can pick up fruits and veggies for you ahead of time from the market, which usually closes at 4pm. Pineapple and cantaloupe keep best in this climate. Limes are also nice in your rum.


Some other useful notes, the drinking water is potable in Dangriga. We drank straight from the tap in the bathroom at Pals. IE will provide all the water you will need in dromedary bags. Be sure to check for leaks, as the covers of these can often leak. IE also provided white gas and MSR fuel bottles, which was good because airlines don't like fuel bottles, even when they are empty.


The next morning we met at IE just before 9am to get geared up and shuttled out to the cayes. Didn't take long to get squared away. Leif gave us a good briefing of the area, where to camp, where the best snorkeling places are, etc...

Island Expeditions Office and our boat charter
The Information board at IE

Ready to hit the water
Tobacco Caye
Always fun packing 8 days of food and water into your boat






All ready to start the adventure, stay tuned!

That's all the time I have for now. Another post to follow tomorrow hopefully!

by Brian Newhook (noreply@blogger.com) at May 16, 2017 07:53 am

Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde: Nouvelles
Cette section du site Le Kayak de Mer dans le Nouveau Monde présente les nouvelles et actualités qui touchent de près ou d'un peu plus loin, le kayak de mer, le milieu marin, la faune et la flore, l'environnement, des trouvailles et nouveautés d'équipement de kayak et plus.

Im happy I now registered


1

by Darin at May 16, 2017 06:23 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Mon 15/05-2017 Day 52

Pos: 54.3193,-130.3185 Loc: Prince Rupert Acc: Sheila + Greg’s house no paddling today
The last day in Prince Rupert! I went food shopping this morning, while John was sanding and finishing my kayak hull layup. Perfect work! He also could get the parcel with my Optimizer device for eventually being able again to send out my e-mail updates every evening via my sat phone – like I did regularly around South America. The installation of the device seemed to look good, but it was still not working…my partner Peter Unold tried his best for 1 1/2 hrs from Sweden via Team Viewer to get it going. The last resort was then the re-install the x-gate program. But the download took that long that he had to hit the bed in Sweden with 9 hours time difference ahead.
A chance for John here to jump in and to prove one more skillin his bundle of multitalents – after the download and installation was finished, he was able to get the whole new setup eventually going. Thank goodness! Nothing is stressing me much, but non-working IT-stuff does…
Next job for my best host ever was to assist me on water testing the bottom of my dry suit, as I recently got a wet ass on paddling. It looks like we found the leakage. Couldn’t glue the suit though today, as it has to dry first. A job for the next sunny beach stop, maybe already tomorrow!
To relax, John took me on a short scenic drive on HW 16, to see also a bit from the hinterland of Canada. Thanks! Stunningly beautiful so far!
Meanwhile Mike was back from his test paddle with his new QCC kayak, he seemed to fit everything in, and even performed a few chilly rolls! He is feeling also all set to launch tomorrow early morning. It will be fun! A sunny day, but a light to moderate headwind. See how far we’ll be paddling…

by Freya at May 16, 2017 05:59 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Subway Series - "Blooming", 59th and Lex, mosaic by Elizabeth Murray

All work and no play may make Bonnie a boring blogger, as I said in my last post, but tonight it's also given me the idea to add to my poor neglected "Subway Series" with a post I've been meaning to do for a very long time. For those who aren't up on baseball lingo, in normal NYC parlance, a subway series is a set of games between our two hometown teams, the Yankees and the Mets, but here on Frogma, I had at some point thought it would be really neat to do a set of posts about the beautiful art installations you see in many of NYC's subway stations.

It was a fun idea. I haven't done as much with it as I'd hoped to, mostly because being a smartphone resistor means not having a camera perpetually on-hand, but in December 2015, my friend Mandy and I had gone for our annual holiday window viewing and finished that off with the carol service at the Brick Presbyterian Church on the Upper East Side, where I sang with the choir until a while after I moved to Brooklyn, it was a really good choir and I loved singing with them, but the commute got to be a bit much. I have been back for a couple of carol services, which are lovely, and it worked out really nicely for Mandy and me to attend that day.

This took us through the subway station at 59th and Lexington, which may very well have been where I came up with the "subway series" idea, and of course I had my camera for the windows, and Mandy's very patient when I need to make a random picturetaking stop. This particular station is a standout for me because I used to travel through it every day on my way to work, and the before-and-after contrast between how it was then and now is really something.

I was working at Carnegie Hall when I moved to the Upper East Side, and my morning commute involved transferring at this station from the 4, 5, or 6 that I would catch at 86th and Lexington to the N or the R that would get me to Carnegie Hall (yes, that is ALSO how you get to Carnegie Hall). The platforms are in different parts of the station and to get from one to the other, you would go through a big squarish mezzanine area. Now at that time, that station was one of the victims of circa 70's "decor", and UGH, the mezzanine was hideous. The walls were covered with rectangular tiles of what I would call operating room green, darkened with the grime of years and halfheartedly lit by half-broken fluo
rescent light fixtures.

Not a particularly heartening place to walk through, but hey, it was a commute, it doesn't have to be pretty.

Luckily for folks who have that commute today, though, at some point it got to be 59th and Lex's turn for an MTA Arts for Transit makeover - and what a job Elizabeth Murray, the artist who got the commission, did! I don't get to the Upper East Side much anymore, and I can't remember what sent me up there for the first time after the installation was done, but the first time I went through there after the installation, I think my jaw actually may have dropped when I walked into what had been the dreariest chamber and found the walls covered with shining swirling mosaic - it was like that moment in The Wizard of Oz when everything goes Technicolor! I did have one hint that things had changed in the form of a stray coffee cup like the one shown above, I saw that in the corridor as I approached the mezzanine and I did take it as a clue that things might have changed since my last trip through there, but I was still surprised at the beautiful colors that had replaced the old dirty bluish-grayish-greenish. Absolutely spectacular. I didn't have a camera that day, but I think that it was that day that I thought of sharing some of the subway art I enjoyed. This one took me a while, but here it is at last!

Click here to read more about the art and the artist. Click on the first photo for a slideshow view.  


by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 16, 2017 04:30 am

May 15, 2017

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

A wildlife spectacular

On a cold and blustery day at the end of April we drove to Newburgh at the mouth of the River Ythan (pronounced "Eye-than") to do some wildlife watching. Although less than an hour away, we hadn't previously visited and were reminded that we really should do by an article on BBC Radio Scotland's "Out of Doors" programme.




We parked near the golf course and walked a short way along a path through the dunes which are such a feature of this part of the coast to reach the edge of the estuary close to where the Ythan enters the North Sea.  A guided wildlife watching group and some families were already enjoying the sights.








There are lots of birds on the Ythan.  Eider ducks (Somateria mollissima) are simply everywhere; this is the largest breeding colony of these striking sea ducks in the UK with some 1500 pairs nesting in the dunes of the Forvie National Nature Reserve - with non-breeding birds the summer population can be up to 5000 strong.

The heaviest, fastest flying and largest UK duck, Eiders feed primarily on molluscs, especially Mussels which they can swallow whole and crush in their gizzard - crabs are also taken and are similarly swallowed whole once the legs have been removed; a remarkable digestive feat!  The male Eiders are truly beautiful birds; predominantly black and white with pale green napes and a salmon pink blush to their breasts.  They also have a distinctive call - which leads to them being known to generations of children as "woo-woo birds"....try the video on the RSPB page to hear why!

As well as Eiders, the Ythan estuary is home to four species of terns; largely Sandwich Terns and Arctic Terns, but we were delighted to get close views of a Little Tern (Sternula albifrons) which was fishing right in front of us.  Forvie has between 15 and 35 pairs of these lovely little birds breeding each year - and this is a quarter of the entire Scottish breeding population.

Sand Martins were whizzing along the shore and we watched a pair finishing a nest burrow in a sand dune right next to the path.  The birds at Forvie make for a great wildlife experience in their own right, but it wasn't birds we'd primarily come to see....







 Now, I can get close views of seals every single time that I get in a sea kayak, so why come to a beach on a raw day to see them?  Well, just across the channel Atlantic Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) haul out onto the sand to rest, to moult and to pup and they can be seen at quite close quarters without disturbance.

The UK's largest land carnivore, Grey Seal bulls can reach 2.6 metres in length and weigh up to 350Kgs - they're an animal to be respected, especially when in a sea kayak!  The bulls are generally dark grey, brown or black with some lighter blotches whilst the cows are usually lighter grey with some darker blotches.




 The pebbles on the shores of the North Sea and Moray Firth coasts are actually quite similar colours to the seals.





 
But what makes the seals at the Ythan such a spectacle is that there are a lot of them.......






....an awful lot of them!  Over 1000 animals haul out here; the sight and noise is extraordinary - and if the wind is blowing from the north we're assured that the smell is too.   One of the presenters of the "Out of Doors" radio programme described this as one of the greatest wildlife spectacles not just in Scotland or the UK, but in Europe.

We'd agree - it's a truly world-class wildlife experience and very accessible too. The north side of the estuary is now an area of special protection and this designation means that it's a criminal offence to recklessly disturb seals which are hauled out here.

To get the best sighting, visiting near to low water allows a fairly close approach from the south side of the river, but doesn't disturb the animals.  If they raise their heads or start to move - you're too close.  From the main road through the village of Newburgh, turn onto Beach Road (near the Newburgh Inn) and drive to the car park near the golf course.  A five minute walk will bring you to the water and this remarkable wildlife watching location.





by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 15, 2017 10:08 pm

SimonWillis.net
Triathlon, cycling, sea kayaking, swimming and life in the Scottish Highlands

Triathlete in Scotland? Do This.

If you're doing a long course triathlon in 2017, please give serious consideration to doing this swim.  I did it last year and wrote about it on my Ironman blog.  It was a genuine challenge which I honestly did not know I could complete.  But after that, I could take on anything.  

So when I stood on the start lines of my half and full Ironman races last year I was actually looking forward to those swims.  They held no fear because, after all, I had swum the Sound of Mull.  

Entry is by donation - give what you can. HighlandOpenwaterSwim.com

[Edit - this was a SUPERB day, with many swimmers far exceeding limits many would normally set themselves.  Take a look at the photos from this event, then follow Highland Open Water Swim on Facebook to make sure you don't miss future swims.]


by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 15, 2017 04:54 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

GLID renovering

Att renovera en närmare hundra år gammal kajak kan ge flera svåra val. Trä som är tunt och ofta blir blött påverkas och blir svagare. Även metalldelarna utsätts för korrosion och börjar släppa. En del konstruktioner är lättare och andra krångligare. Ska man använda originalmetoder eller ta till moderna saker som epoxi! Vill man använda kajaken som ett utställnings föremål eller i skick att användas.  Svåra frågor är det. Några kajaker som jag har är så trasiga att man i stort sätt måste byta ut samtliga delar för de ska kunna användas. Byter man ut så mycket förlorar men ofta känslan av paddla en antik kajak. GLID kajaken är både nitad och skruvad från utsidan flera delar börjar sitta dåligt fast. Nubben har börjat vittra sönder. Även översta bordläggningen på båda sidor har djupa sprickor längs stora delar av kajaken, skulle jag byta det se så blir det väldigt mycket jobb, stora delar av kajaken måste byggas om. Har inget bra svar på hur jag ska göra. Funderar på att använda original delarna men använda epoxi för att det ska hålla för ordenligt användande.

by Bengt Larsson at May 15, 2017 01:09 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

Söndagsmys i solnedgången

Igår tog jag mig en liten runda i det goa solnedgångsljuset. Skälderviken låg platt som tusan. En liten molnstrimma gjorde att solen inte gick ned i havet men det fina ljuset slapp man inte undan. Lite folk på stränderna, en och annan fiskare på pirarmarna, ett par båtar och en sup-paddlare. Det går att ana...

Inlägget Söndagsmys i solnedgången dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 15, 2017 09:47 am

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sun 14/05-2017 Day 51

Pos: 54.3193,-130.3185 Loc: Prince Rupert Acc: Sheila + Greg’s house no paddling today
John had already taken my kayak on my arrival day to his workshop, where it had been drying out. This morning, he picked me to drive to the shop to do the necessary reinforcement of the last hull piece. He had already organized all material, and thankfully had gained his skills by working for Curent Design kayaks for a while. It looked also like he knew what he had to do! Despite I may be kind of able to do this job myself, I am rather thankful about a kind male hand to take over the dusty and sticky job…thanks, John! It all looked good at the end, I also once more cleaned my rudder, and now, finally, eventually, my kayak should be all set to survive some dragging over rocks again…although, this leg, I have Mike to help carrying our kayaks up the beaches! Both guys took a very interested look at my kayak in general, high time this great design is getting into (a reasonable quality) serial production again for any other ambitious expedition kayaker to purchase!
The afternoon, I spend on downloading satellite images for the next leg. While it was extremely convenient to have had that long list of additional camp way points provided by John Kimantas maps and books and the BCMTNA, this list unfortunately only reaches out as far as the Canadian boarder. Now, it is again “back to the basic research of way points via Google maps, satellite images, charts and mostly – experience…! In this maze of islands with so many miles of coast line, it takes a while! And unfortunately, the vast majority of sandy beaches are further south…but in exchange, a bunch of small, mostly indigenous villages are located on many of the islands. We’ll see what kind of campsites we’ll find! It has now to fit once more two tents though…
Time for dinner! John took Mike and me to the Eagle Bluff restaurant in Cow Bay Road, an excellent eating place! Thanks very much, John! We had once more a really great time chatting and getting to know each other better.

by Freya at May 15, 2017 06:57 am

May 14, 2017

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Sat 13/05-2017 Day 50

Pos: 54.3193,-130.3185 Loc: Prince Rupert Acc: Sheila + Greg’s house no paddling today
John has organized another stay for me for the next days here in Prince Rupert: The parents of his kayaking friend Josh, have a free small basement apartment, where I got moved today. Sheila and Greg, very nice place and folks, thanks! We met for lunch with Mike in a Chinese restaurant, and now I actually had the first real chance to take a closer “look” at my potential paddling partner. To organize a “blind date” just over a very short time on the internet with a maybe 20 min call an a few text messages out of my last town stay in Shearwater was not easy, and also a bit of a risk for me. Mike has told me he has some paddling experience in this area, circumnavigated Lake Superior and Vancouver Island, looked sporty on his facebook in general, has a slim fast QCC kayak, is 61 years old, and that was basically all I knew about him 🙂 – Whereas checking out *my* profile online is not that hard…maybe it takes a bit longer…but I set some clear rules, and he promised to behave nicely on and off the water 🙂
I felt more and more comfortable by the time getting to know Mike better with the thought to spend some time with him together on my next leg up to Sitka. If this would change, we both would have fully independent gear and skills to continue on separate paths. We had all three a lot to talk, and time was flying by. In between, I had to jump online to finish the updating of my last leg, before John too me over to his apartment where Mike is also staying and organizes his own gear. I checked on his kayak and kit, all looks all right! We liked to sit over maps together in the evening. John had prepared some nice snacks at his place, and once more time was passing quickly on planning in all directions. It will be very exciting!

by Freya at May 14, 2017 11:01 pm

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Nærtur i hammocken

Padleklubbens avdeling i Narvik la ut melding på FB med bilde av en hammock, og antydet uteovernatting. Selv hadde jeg avlyst overnattingstur ettersom jeg var hardt rammet av noe forkjølelsesdrit. Men dersom jeg bare kunne hoppe rett fra varm sofa til hammock? Det var bare å ta frem drillen og skru opp et feste i husveggen, vips, så kunne Amoken henges imellom storselja og huset.

Her kunne jeg jo til og med se detektimen, wifien nådde jo ut hit. Jo, dette var saker. Attpåtil med utsikt til skipsleia, så jeg gledet meg til å se hurtigruta Finnmarken gå forbi midt på natten. Den er vel her i tretiden en gang.

Midnattsola kommer ikke før om enda noen dager til, men jeg var også spent på hvor tidlig sola ville stå opp. Det kan ikke være så lenge den er nede nå heller. Flotte farger fikk jeg å se på, alle veier. Vet ikke hvorfor jeg ikke har gjort dette før.

Etter en liten stund kom det tøffende en sjark forbi. Folk ville ha direktesending på Facebook, men det fant jeg ingen steder å ordne. Vet det går an på datamaskinen, men jeg var jo på telefonen. Må sikkert ha en app for å kunne det, jeg har ikke det. I hvert fall så kom sjarken ganske langt mens jeg lette, så den er veldig liten på bildet... (Den lille prikken over nausttaket midt i bildet...)

Jeg sovna, og sov så pass godt at jeg enset ikke hurtigruta da den må ha gått forbi. Men her er i hvert fall NSO Crusader.

Amok Draumr 3.0 er god å sove i. Men jeg glemte mitt eget supertriks for å sove godt i telt/ute/borte - ørepropper. Derfor våknet jeg noen ganger i løpet av natten likevel, selv om jeg sov gjennom Hurtigruta. Fuglene holdt et skikkelig leven, ikke minst hordene av gjess som flyr att og fram for tiden. De beiter seg opp før de flyr videre nordover. (Men jeg fikk null gåsedritt på køya, heldigvis. Flaks.)

Anbefales. Når jeg ikke turte å ta sjansen på en lengre tur, var dette absolutt en grei erstatning, framfor å ligge inne i senga. Det er blitt så pass varmt nå, at det ikke ble kaldt heller, selv uten jervenduk.

by Miamaria (noreply@blogger.com) at May 14, 2017 11:51 pm

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 14th - Oak bay (#31)

I led the second day of the PC level 1 class and we paddled over to Willows Beach, practicing strokes and stopping every now and again to focus on skills. Again, we had good conditions, All three passed! :)
click to enlarge
9 km, YTD 293 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 14, 2017 05:51 pm

kajak.nu
ute räknas. Ute med kajak räknas minst dubbelt :)

April 2017

Inte mycket men i alla fall lite paddlat i april 🙂 Fick till en mycket fint solnedgångsrunda på Skälderviken En go tur i finväder vid Kullaberg Lite bassängplask i Ängelholm Samt en kortis utan bad på Västersjön. En badkrukerunda (till) helt enkelt. En dryg vecka i Trysil hann vi också med i vårt ej så...

Inlägget April 2017 dök först upp på kajak.nu.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 14, 2017 04:49 pm

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 13th - Cadboro Bay (#30)

Jennie and I led the first day of a Paddle Canada level 1 course for three participants (Jarek, Sybil and Glenn). Conditions were nice but we did not cover much ground as we were practicing strokes and rescues. All the students did well. I forgot to turn the GPS on for the first few minutes!
click to enlarge
2 km, YTD 284 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 14, 2017 05:48 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Fri 12/05-2017 Day 49

Pos: 54.3193,-130.3185 Loc: Prince Rupert Acc: Pioneer Guesthouse Dist: 38,5 km Start: 07:40 End: 15:20
Karel’s forecast was not really inviting for the crossing over to Prince Rupert with around 15 knots SSE, gusts up to 28 knots. SSE may sound nice firsthand going NE, but on an open crossing, you have to point very much into the wind to not get blown off track. The strong wind was eventually a fully quartering headwind. I pondered seriously to go at all, and asked Karel with a text on the sat phone how it would be on Saturday before I turned around once more in my sleeping bag. When I woke up again maybe half an hour later, his answer was not really encouraging better for Sat and Sun, so I guessed I may also as well just go now. The visibility had improved with diminishing rain, and it did not look too bad – from my sheltered beach at least!
I was up and packed quickly once I decided to go, not bothering too much about keeping tent and gear dry and clean as I’d be in a dry room tonight anyway! The first 15 km were relatively sheltered from the SSE, seas were flat, and I already guessed the forecast may be not coming true that strong. But I already saw whitecaps in the distance…as soon as I came off Porcher Island and hit the main current, right at the time of the tie change, the wind doubled literally in speed to maybe 25-30 knots “continuous gusts”, and whipped up the current to sizable waves. I had to lean into the wind all the time not to get blow over, and pointed my bow many degrees to the EAST of the easy visible Port Edward to maintain my track! Well, maybe I could have done it easier The straight line from my camp beach would have been passing the Kinhan islands to the east, an then entering the passage between Digby and Kaien Island to reach Prince Rupert. Maybe I should simply have let go, instead of forcing myself to pass The Kinhan Islands on the luv side, heading straight north with the strong wind and whatever current to enter the channel north of Dingby Island, then hoping to have shelter enough to go with or without current up to Prince Rupert? It may have been a detour distance wise, but it may have been less fighting to keep a straight line.
Between West and East Kinhan Island, I was close to do exactly that, but ten my stubbornness told me to keep on punching into the strong side wind. I still made relatively good speed of 5-6 km/h, and it was worth to keep on going. As East Kinhan Island was blocking my view of the channel entrance east of Dingby Island, I was not really sure what was going on, and where I eventually had to really go? I remember Port Edward was on the right side of the entrance??
Finally, I was free of East Kinhan Island, and the channel entrance showed up. Time for me to carefully let go – means I suddenly was speeding up even to more than 10 km/h, as now obviously a strong eddy current added to the wind. Not too bad! Also, because I saw a ferry approaching from the north, and knew the ship must turn in just where I was. I flew along to get out of the danger zone and close to the south eastern shores of Dingby Island. All god!
I landed on a sandy spot to text my Prince Rupert host John Androsky I’d be across, and where to meet? The Yacht Club was the place to go. I didn’t had much to paddle to get there, wind and current carried me at easy to Pillsbury Point, then things slowed down a bit. I really enjoy to “cool down” after such an exciting crossing approach of new shores, and to slowly settle into the new surrounding.
John was meeting me at an early jetty together with Kevin from the local paper for an interview. It is so nice to be expected by a host in a new town! Thanks very much, John, to look after me here! He invited me for the first night to the Pioneer guesthouse, where I could take my well deserved hot shower, did laundry and sorted and maintained my gear. We also had a look on my kayak hull, how @Wayne Robert’s repair held up. Actually, his concept of stiffening the whole hull was also preventing the dreaded bulkhead spots to wear out more than the rest! BUT – the last 1,5 m where he did not reinforce the hull because we guessed it will be all right there had now exactly the same “disease” – the layup broke at the last tiny stern bulkhead just before the rudder, it soaked water and became soft over 30 cm…and another long but not deep scratch tended to do the same…so we need to do the same repair also for the last section of the stern. We should have done this that other time already in Shearwater…Thankfully, John has a small shop for this kind of job, and is also skillfull in those kind of jobs. THANK GOODNESS! Always a helpful male hand around if needed…He also brought me some parcels I ordered – a new deck bag sponsored by North Water, a Crazye Creek inflatable camp chair which looks very promising, a new GPS as one of my old ones doesn’t get satellites any more (shit electronics…) – but the most needed “optimizer” device for posting my updates via sat phone as usual will hopefully arrive Monday!
John picked me up for dinner, and also to meet up with Mike Dziobak, who is interested to paddle the next section to Sitka with me. Mike has just been driving for four days from Michigan/ USA almost across the whole continent, and was accordingly tired and opted to not join us for dinner with four other friends in a nice restaurant with live Jazz-music from some of his friends. John is also a musician, playing drums and newly double bass. Quite interesting!

by Freya at May 14, 2017 12:28 am

May 13, 2017

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

Freya Hoffmeister
Goddess of Love to the Seas

Thu 11/05-2017 Day 48

Pos: here Loc: Useless Point Acc: tent Dist: 35,0 km Start: 07:00 End: 16:15
Paddling was rather unexciting today, dead calm water again, light wind from the back, mostly dry, it could be worse! At some point I heard a loud engine – a plane, a motor vessel? The roaring sound was rather like a huge ship, but here, in the maze of small islands? Suddenly, a white massive wall slowly appeared behind a small island – but the ferry to the Queen Charlotte Islands was more distant than I thought. another, smaller motor boat was heading up to me, what a traffic out here! I rarely saw the odd single ship rather in the distance the other days, and now, one day close to Prince Rupert, I’m on a highway! The small motorboat disappeared behind another little island, and when I came up closer, I saw it was tied up to a larger mother ship, the “MV Surfbird”. I came even closer, and a beautiful black Labrador dog was barking noisily on me approaching silently.
I called out a “Hello!”, and a few seconds later, Doug Stewart, the owner, appeared from the engine room for a chat. His wife Carol was just out for a holiday, but they both usually live all year with their dog on the ship, anchoring wherever needed, working with some marine stuff I didn’t fully get. What a life! After a few minutes, another similar size ship, the “MV Hawk Bay” came into the bay. The owner Stan and Karen Hansen, with now for the change a brown Labrador dog, came alongside for an even nicer chat when I was asked on board by Doug. A lovely way to speed some afternoon hours! I would not paddle to Prince Rupert today anyway, my paddling has mostly been done for today besides two kilometers to the last sandy beach before the channel crossing. I got a cup of tea and home made brownies served, thanks a lot! The two Labrador dogs got also crazy “talking” to each other from ship to ship!
I was heading around the corner for my night beach, just had the tent up and settled down with my laptop for writing my update, when I heard Doug’s skiff nearing my beach. Were the guys coming over for an evening dog walk? No, they liked to pick me back up for dinner! Thanks! I accepted happily, not having cooked yet myself. The keep dry feet on entering the skiff, Doug was maneuvering close to the now bare rocks on quite low tide. An easy natural jetty! Karen had meanwhile cooked a yummy dinner with many fresh veggies, just what I missed most! Thanks for that! Some more nice chats about marine life and bear stories, and I got away with a doggie bag of fresh veggies and a second cab of bear spray. Both, Doug and Stan have tried them themselves on some bear encounters – they work…Now I have the choice between two similar shaped red and black cans of bear spray, and can operate them double handed like Django pulling out two colts. But maybe it would be appropriate to politely ask the bear before spraying if he rather likes a taste of Black or Red Chayenne pepper?

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:26 pm

Wed 10/05-2017 Day 47

Pos: here Loc: Joachim Spit Acc: tent Dist: 37,5 km Start: 07:40 End: 16:05
I took my time this morning to check my sat phone for birthday wishes, and to call my partner Peter. Another stretch inside the sleeping bag, but the sunshine and another calm dry day was lurking outside! Tide was still extreme low springs at 8 am, so I had to paddle all the way around all the outer rocks of Larsen Island, instead of being able to sneak between Larsen and Banks Island. No big deal on a sea looking like a perfect millpond! Just some friendly detour.
i had no clear plan how to continue, and eventually rather ted for a crossing on dead calm water to Goschen Island, instead of paddling the not too attractive curve via McCaukley and Dolphin Island. The last 5 km, the very low headwind all day breezed up with the tidal change, and now paddling was a tad bit more work against wind and tide, but still zero swell in the sea. I wanted to check on te wide sany beach south of Joachim Point, when i spotted kayaks on the water, just coming from there! My birthday party participants? this was my second encounter with a similar pre-season guide training group of about 10 paddlers, this time led by Sarah Osborne, a lady I had never met, but already spoken to on some kind of a phone interview. Once more, our kayaking world is small! One guy was carrying an interesting “Personal Flotation Device” on the back deck – an abandoned rescue ring from some ship! We took a few pictures, but were unfortunately heading into opposite directions.
The boulders at Joachim Spit was still mostly submerged when I arrived two hours after high tide, and I quickly slid over the inner rocks with funny currents. On lowest tide, I may have to do a detour of 500 m or more around the outer spit rocks! The best place to camp was on the eastern side at a small creek, where there would be no boulders on lowest tide. Another idyllic place for my “West Coast” birthday! I had a shower in the creek, and ran around naked for about an hour in bright sunshine! How could it be better…
Around 6 pm, the bell buoy at the passage entrance started to ring like church bells – why? It is still dead calm water and best visibility, until now, 9 pm! It is still ringing…if it continues all night, I’ll put ear plugs in. Low chance for bear visits anyway here.

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:25 pm

Tue 09/05-2017 Day 46

Pos: here Loc: Solander Point north Acc: tent Dist: 42,7 km Start: 06:30 End: 16:30
At highest tide this night, the metal gangway down to my floating dock was shifted to fully horizontal! Quite some 5 m tidal range here on springs. Some quick, clean packing from the floating dock, without falling or dropping anything into the water! As long as the tent was up, there was not much space to reach the kayak. But this was one of the best “exotic” campsites I ever had. It was promising weather, dry and occasional sunny, with lowest wind an seas. I could hug the coast as much as I liked to and stopped in many interesting places. For example, in a typical offshore boulder bay, with many “match sticks” or “tooth picks” of fat logs piled up criss cross high and dry on lowest tide, behind big round boulders, and many more logs floating upfront. Quite an impressive view!
The next interesting spot was a dead end into a wide round inlet behind an islet – one of those magic shallow places on lowest tide, with crystal clear water and not very shy geese and a crane couple. I bet they barely have seen a boat in here!
I could paddle inside the closest rocks on highest tide around noon, and landed on an offshore rock shelf just to check on an interesting huge orange object – which I better should not have done, as when I wanted to climb out of my boat, I was slipping on some rocks and fell into the water, with my kayak half capsized. But no big deal with a dry suit and an electrical pump…but my kayak did not feel safe enough to walk up to the orange object to have a closer look when I had lifted it high and dry up on the sloping rocks with rising tide and small swell. But I assume it was some huge orange pipeline tube wrapped on a wrecked metal spool – whatever it was supposed to be used for.
I checked on the Stewarts Passage campsite, an inlet at a river mouth, but besides another crane couple, noisy geese and those inviting looking, but mostly not good to camp green river bank meadows with lots of bugs, it was not a place to stay for me. My preferred place for the night was in the Kirkendale Islands, which had many sandy beaches, but none of them looked dry enough for spring tide camping. The very best on a small islet with soaking soft sand on the bottom on low tide may have done the job, but in case, it had no upland retreat. I rather checked the next inviting one at Solander Point, which was perfect for my pre-birthday night! Actually, as I am 9 hrs behind, my birthday already started at 3 pm today…Temperatures have been rising in the sunshine so far I enjoyed to run around naked for a while, a treat for a body stuck in a dry suit all day! But as soon as a cloud covers the sun, it is rather sill freezing!
On my walk to the creek in the cove to the south, I forgot my pot to fill my water bags. No chance to get clean or water at all in my bags in a shallow small creek, so I walked back and then filled right three bags. One never know where the next camp spot is, and if it has water…but mostly, I’m feeling I’m rather “walking with a beer into the pub” arriving on a new site with my filled water bags, as most campsite have a good fresh water creek not far away. But I rather like to be on the safe side, and do carry a few liters more.

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:25 pm

Mon 08/05-2017 Day 45

Pos: here Loc: Foul Bay Acc: tent Dist: 41,2 km Start: 06:40 End: 17:00
I have slept well padded and halfway leveled in continuous rain and strong gusty wind. This also meant, I was a bit worried about the old trees above me could drop a branch, and if the waved slapping heavily up the gravel beach from three directions now would reach my kayak at highest tide at 12.50 am at night? I was peeping out of my tent with my strong flashlight a couple of times within the last hour, but this time I seemed to be still lucky with the position of my boat on two high logs. It’s not fully spring tide yet, I really have to watch the next nights! It is simply not much fun to get out of the tent in darkness in rain and wind to drag the heavy kayak higher up like last spring tide time.
I launched at lowest tide from the very bottom of the gravel beach, but it were mostly small round gravel, no big deal for my hull. It was dense fog, not really pleasant to navigate through a maze of rocks and moderate boomers on higher swell than expected. The southern end of Banks Island is just absolutely exposed to south western swell, and my bay is even catching it up. The offshore Queen Charlotte Islands are not protecting yet! It was quite a nasty ride the first two hours to navigate this minefield in fog and drizzle, until I reached the calm inner Terror Point channel, leading to a sandy white shell spit. I relaxed, and got out of my kayak, checking if it was worth waiting the tide rising to flood the channel that i could pass safely? Well, i had the second channel as an option, see if this one is already flooded.
It was – almost, I had to get out of my boat for a few meters not to drag over rocks to heavily. The other side was actually relatively calm as expected, bending now north west and not catching the swell as much as before. It was also clearing up, and paddling was feeling safer again, though I had the current fully against me. It was different paddling the other days in the protected channels, finding eddies if needed, than now being in the open sea again! If there is an eddy, the breakers would prevent to find it. There were also not many islands to paddle behind in some shelter, so I stayed mostly offshore and at least enjoyed the alive water.
Waller Bay had a lurking island with a white coarse cobble beach all around, with open grassy upland forest inviting to camp, but there did not show any access up through the sharp big rocks! Mean! But I was aiming for another known primary campsite in Foul Bay. It was a rocky steep beach with a meadow on top at a river mouth, but I did not trust the actually nice meadow staying dry this close to spring tides. The upland site in the forest looked all right, but had many bugs and was obviously shady. Plus, by myself, I had to drag my kayak at least 20 m over quite some sharp small rocks, which I did not really feel like doing…not to talk about tomorrow morning the same again…?
I had another option…just across the bay was the artificially made log dump side of a mine (logging or mining or both???) with a lovely small new wooden floating dock lurking…nobody there working or to ask…I decided to camp just right on the dock, leaving my kayak afloat! Only one single small duck shit on the clean well brushed wooden planks, the space just about enough to erect my tent, no bugs in a light breeze, kitchen with sink for the dishes and brushing teeth with water closet just out the door, very unlikely a bear or wolf visit via the gangway, no kayak dragging and gear shuffling upland, a small river up the gravel road for fresh water, clean metal rails on the gangway to hang dry my gear – and – all SUNSHINE! It couldn’t be better! He he he…usually I do prefer nature, but this option was too good not to take! I want more of those! 🙂 It was dead calm today in here, and if I’d bee bold and keen it would give also a great swimming platform (I was not…) One could actually also camp on the road on small gravel, just in case there would be more than one tent to fit – and if there is no loading action and bothering anyone…at least they did not put up a sign like “Private – No access” or such, they probably have a heart for the rare lonely kayaker!

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:25 pm

Sun 07/05-2017 Day 44

Pos: here Loc: Calamity Bay Acc: tent Dist: 35,8 km Start: 06:50 End: 14:15
The pretty sun was gone, but I could at least pack dry before the rain was back. Also some quite strong wind, from due south, which made the crossing over to Trutch Island a bit choppy, but fast. I rested inside a long narrow bay with some nice waterfall creating floating “cream piles” of foam, before I paddled back into the strong following wind. But it could be worse! I had stopped already earlier at Campania Island to put on a second fleece shirt, which was a good idea in the wind chill. With my long new neoprene boots and two thick fluffy pairs of socks, sufficient fleece headgear and my dry suit I managed to stay warm, even with warm feet now most days! Now I need to create the ultimate glove system which I have on my mind already…
I decided to paddle outside Banks Island, as it has such a nice maze of smaller islands, but also limited known campsites and no real good sandy beach, rather gravel beaches and upland camping. It gets close to spring tides now, I have to carefully watch my campsites! The Block Islands, the small group of islands before Banks Island, looked for the first time as there would be many options to camp on the now thick granite rocks – if it would be not so exposed and not the bet treatment for my fragile kayak hull. But just in case – or for the change, here it would be an option. But I had a way point for a known primary campsite on a steep gravel beach with upland camping. The maze of islands on the way has quite some strong current going, I could not always go where I liked to paddle in combination with the strong wind.
When I was nearing the bay, I was not quite sure from which side to approach the campsite, as on my chart the area dries mostly out. The channel between the main and the smaller islands would have been ok, although I approached from the backside. Just pick the right gravel beach, or you’ll stay dry when the tide goes out! Camp on the gravel may be ok in neaps, I opted for a padded space under the trees in the upland. Not really leveled, but my clothing and bag padding did the fine tuning job. Feel quite bear- and wolf proof here…and rain again…

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:24 pm

Sat 06/05-2017 Day 43

Pos: here Loc: Campania Island west Acc: tent Dist: 35,5 km Start: 06:25 End: 14:00 The wind and seas calmed down already yesterday late afternoon, and around 9 pm even a naughty sun ray was peeping through the clouds! Nice promise for today. Karel also said “sunshine” – at least in the afternoon. Around 3 am, I heard something sniffing outside my tent, looked out with some “Kschhhhh!” noise and saw a midsize dark something disappearing, but couldn’t figure out what it might have been. No traces in the small pebbles on the sand, so it was not too heavy – and obviously also not dangerous…no more other fresh tracks in the sand around me.
Campania Island was lurking this morning in good visibility and about 20 km distance with light following wind and current mostly with me. I opted for the straight line, enjoying some good 7-8 km/h until I came to a distinct current change with rippling water. Some whole fresh tree was floating in that area, probably trapped in the current and providing many sea gulls a nice platform.
I checked on the first wide sandy beach in the south, it has a good place to camp upland. The next cove behind a wide reef had a sandy bottom, and some rock fringed grassy inlet. It looked very inviting to camp in the sunshine, but not for me, as I have to overcome the “rock fence” with my kayak myself, which is hard on my kayak hull with one person. And it looked so magic and virgin here, I did not like to intrude the nature. maybe also because a pretty wolf was tucked in the sunny grass while probably hunting for small animals. I caught a nice picture before he was disappearing, probably as surprised as me.
I liked to paddle on for another 10 km, although arriving also again early. But there is nothing else as known campsite on this island. Actually, I like also a half day on a sunny beach! I was a bit curious about the other known sandy beach just 800 m further up, but before I could peep around the headland, I turned off again to the first wide white sandy beach, which looked jut perfect with a large creek and those rocky mountains behind. I will have a bath there! Tide was already halfway out, and I almost got stuck between the reefs before stopping where I thunk the best camp site would be. Actually, it could be almost everywhere on this beach! I opted for a middle site, leaving the large creek mouth for the bears. Although I camped right besides an old rusty bomb, or was it just a huge gas bottle? I better did not check too close…
A pleasure to get everything dry again! It’s really a back and forth here, and up and down, lots of rain, or no rain, wet or dry gear. I spread all stuff out, and went to the larger creek, armed with soap, towel and my pot. No way I’d jump in there fully, a shower with the pot on the hair wash is the best option, and a quick overall shower after! It was so sunny, I was walking around naked for a while, to catch as much sun as possible, although it was still a bit chilly. This could be fixed! A campfire was quickly built, and soon I was tanning on the front from the sun, and roasting on the backside from the fire. Or the other was round…not too bad! I was living outside all afternoon, what a difference to yesterday’s tent prison! Paddling life has all on offer…

by Freya at May 13, 2017 03:23 pm