Paddling Planet

September 03, 2015

Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

Disko Bay - Day 2

One of the most important things to do in the evening is to find the energy to take a walk.  After a long day on the water the easiest thing thing to do is to lie around the tent reading, dozing and drinking hot chocolate.
Staying around camp means that your perspective is restricted to a narrow coastal strip of land and there is so much more to Greenland.  Walking inland during the evening also increases the possibility of seeing Arctic Fox and Hare, plus a wider range of bird species.
The thing that surprised us on our evening walk was the amount of snow left in some areas, on none of my previous visits had we encountered such a large amount of snow, so low down.  Probably an indication of quite a hard winter and/or a late snow fall.
The second day of the paddle dawned grey and cold, the temperature had probably dropped by 12 degrees Celsius overnight, and was not to really recover for the next couple of weeks, although there was a slight respite when we stopped for lunch.
The plan was to head north along the west coast of Arve Prins Ejland, in all our previous visits we had always paddled south along the west coast.  Hopefully it would allow us to see a familiar landscape from a different perspective.
 It was a pity not to head out onto the snow.  A novel experience, at roughly sea level, in late July.
 The snow and ice covered quite a sizable area.
 The view inland from near the slabs at Anoritoq, it was well worth the effort.
 Leaving the inlet at Anoritoq on a rather grey morning.  7 years earlier I watched the people staying in the hut behind, out water ski-ing.  A truly memorable image
 Low cloud, ice and a temperature of 5 degrees.  What a contrast to the day before.
 Crossing Pakitsoq in perfect conditions.  We saw whales in the distance, one of 5 times that we saw them whilst we were away, sadly none were particularly close.
 Crossing Arve Prinsens Ejland, a 4 or 5 mile crossing, weaving across the channel to avoid the larger bergs.
 Ice comes in all manner of colours, shapes and sizes.
 Tracey passing close to some of the larger bergs.  It was at times like this that our paddling speed would increase.  Once you have witnessed a large berg break up, you don't want to pass too close.
 Alex keeping a watch on the bergs.
 Amazingly once we landed on the south east shore of Arve Prinsens Ejland the fog dispersed allowing for a relaxing lunch break.  It was going to be another 2 weeks before we headed south through this channel.

by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at September 03, 2015 09:14 pm

Mark Rainsley
Adventures, writing, photography, other stuff.

Wye vistas

A few photos of the River Wye valley, from the summer. I made excellent progress on my guidebook to this wonderful river, and might even have snuck out for a few paddles in between marathon typing sessions.


Filed under: Canoeing, River Wye, Wales, Writing

by MRY at September 03, 2015 09:09 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

Hoh River [Flickr]

Essex Explorations posted a photo:

Hoh River

The mouth of the Hoh River emptying into the Pacific Ocean. (Photograph by Steve Weileman)

by Essex Explorations at September 03, 2015 05:46 pm

GURUSAILS
Velas para kayaks. Sails for kayaks

Nuevos elementos



En todo el conjunto de materiales que forman nuestras velas, un unico componente estaba en el punto de mira de todos nuestros desarrollos, el enganche de popa. Hasta principios de este 2015 siempre se entregaba el kit con los tipicos mosquetones de aluminio laqueado en colores que tan limitada durabilidad tenian en ambientes de salinidad. No en cambio en zonas de navegacion de interior, rios, pantanos o lagos, en los cuales, la agresion quimica era practicamente nula. 
Desde la segunda mitad de este año se han ido sustituyendo de forma progresiva este componente "sospechoso" por el nuevo mosqueton de doble boca invertida que tras pasar todas las pruebas pertinentes, se ha postulado como un magnifico elemento a prueba de casi todo. Se han ido introduciendo en los kits que han sido entregados de forma aleatoria en algunos pedidos para ver la reaccion de los clientes ante este "diferente" elemento de enganche, independientemente del testing que llevabamos realizando desde hacia varios meses. Los resultados finales han sido excelentes y ya son entregados como un estandar en la que ya es la revision nº 7 de la delta inverso.
Gracias a todos por ser observadores.

by Rafa Dominguez (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 05:53 pm

The Ikkatsu Project
In the Service of the Ocean

Off the Tracks

150903_trains_collide_660

These are the people who are saying that there’s no need to be concerned about oil trains. No need to worry that the increased traffic from multiple trains every day in the Puget Sound watershed will have any unintended down-side. What could go wrong, after all? These are professionals, they know what they’re doing and you should just leave them alone to do their jobs. Because America.

Except they can’t seem to stay on the tracks, at least not here in T-town. Today’s oops moment makes two collisions this week, and 4 cars went off the rails in this latest incident. They were not carrying oil, which is something to be thankful for. The ending, if they had been, would be much different.

massive-explosion-rocks-quebec-town-after-train-carrying-crude-oil-derails massive-explosion-rocks-quebec-town-after-train-carrying-crude-oil-derails At what point is it time to say, “Enough?” The railway is not up for this. They are obviously unprepared, without a plan and hiring at the lowest-bid level. It could just be a bad week, but then we’re lucky it wasn’t like the bad week in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, last year where an oil train accident literally blew up a town and killed 47 people. If this is our bad week, then we are fortunate. But if the oil-by-rail scam really gets rolling, we are headed for more bad weeks and luck never lasts.

We have just begun the public comment period on the draft environmental impact statement for proposed new oil terminals in Gray’s Harbor County. If you want to be heard, now is the time. This is not about jobs; it is simply about making the rich richer and the environment poorer.

 

by Ken Campbell at September 03, 2015 04:13 pm

josebelloseakayaking

Travesía de Tecnificación ACANTILADOS DE ROCHE

Próxima actividad.

PROGRAMA

Se realiza esta actividad en formato travesía para unir el aspecto lúdico con el formativo del kayak de mar. La duración es de una jornada completa, con picnic.


Las condiciones del entorno nos permitirán la práctica de la navegación en distintas circunstancias, desde aguas abiertas a jardines de rocas, bajo acantilados.


De esta manera desarrollaremos un programa de tecnificación personalizado para cada participante, de acuerdo a su nivel, en el que practicaremos: técnicas de paleo y apoyos, maniobras de seguridad y rescate, embarques y desembarques con olas, navegación….


El diseño de la travesía, se ha realizado con los siguientes objetivos:
    • Conocer el paraje de los acantilados de Roche desde el agua, navegando en kayak de Mar.
    • Practicar elementos de seguridad pasiva (preventiva) y activa.
    • Practicar técnicas específicas de navegación en kayak de mar.
    • Practicar maniobras de propulsión y control de la embarcación en diferentes condiciones meteorológicas, viento, olas, ….
    • Realizar convivencia entre los participantes la actividad  


    La travesía tiene como puntos de salida y regreso la Cala del Aceite.


    El interés técnico-deportivo de la actividad es aprovechar el día y la ruta para adquirir conocimientos y habilidades desde el nivel de cada participante, en los diferentes entornos.


    EQUIPO
      • Kayaks de Mar insumergibles, con líneas de vida y cubrebañeras con capacidad de estiba del 100% del equipo personal.
      • Equipo personal completo por palista (Chaleco, silbato, ropa de agua, comida y bebida, ….)

    GUIAS

    Instructores titulados, Guías de Kayak de Mar. Proporción: uno por cada cinco participantes.





            Escuela de deportes nauticos SUROESTE   

    by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 04:41 pm

    Paddle Making (and other canoe stuff)
    Functional paddle art and other canoe related ramblings

    c1900 recreational paddlers

    Another series of old  paddle photos from Ebay...




    The top two photos in the collage feature large beavertail paddles with elaborate grips. The blades have copper tip protectors  and a simple painted chevron pattern








    by Murat (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 11:51 am

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Catfishing

    Okay, the small boat in use in this video has a motor but I still think catfishing is of interest to paddlers.

    Check out this video posted on YouTube if the embedded version below doesn't show for you.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at September 03, 2015 10:00 am

    josebelloseakayaking

    Travesía de tecnificación en los "Acantilados de Roche"


    El próximo domingo 23, actividad de tecnificación en KDM en el entorno de los acantilados de Roche. La ventaja de este tipo de actividad en formato travesía, es la unión del aspecto lúdico con el formativo del kayak de mar.
    El interés técnico-deportivo de la actividad es aprovechar el día y la ruta para adquirir conocimientos y habilidades desde el nivel de cada participante, en los diferentes entornos.
     
     

     Escuela de deportes nauticos SUROESTE   

    by Jose Bello (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 10:25 am

    Jimski's Blog

    Greenland 2015 - Johan Petersen Fjord

    In Early July the sea ice off the East Greenland coast had failed to clear as it would normally during early summer. This meant that there would be no boats running from Kulusuk to take us to the Sea Kayak Expedition base at Tasiilaq. We took the unusual step of making this journey by Helicopter.

    The 10 minute ride was spectacular. We flew close to a couple of places that we had camped during past trips before crossing Kong Oscar Havn and landing at Tasiilaq. The weather was gloomy and cold (2-4 Celsius) but there was plenty of excitement in town for the evenings football match.

    Over the next few days, we made our way through densely packed ice-laden waters and headed around to the north side of Angmagssalik Island. This involves paddling the length of a 20 mile long channel called Ikasagtivaq. It is bound on each side by spectacular snow capped peaks and is a major highway for local hunters. Danish ex-pats refer to is as the E45 after the biggest motorway in Denmark.

    We visited the settlement at Tiniteqilaq before entering Sermilik Fjord and its roving collection of ice bergs. The highlight of the trip was reaching the depths of Johann Petersen Fjord. In Previous years it had been clogged with huge ice bergs but this time it was surprisingly clear.

    The back of the fjord is a frozen amphitheatre on a grand scale. Steep rock walls and ice-falls stretch skywards from the sea. Beyond lies the timeless expanse of the Greenland ice-cap. This place is an other-worldly experience where sometimes the loudest sound is of silence.

    Many thanks to Martin Rickard of Sea Kayak Adventures for another wonderful adventure, and to  P&H Custom Sea Kayaks, Mitchell Blades, Clif Bar UK and Peak UK for their continued support.


    by Jim Krawiecki (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 09:28 am

    Kanotisten.com
    Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

    Båthall 2

    Båthall 2 ligger på Djurgården intill Gröna Lund och har gratis inträda under sommaren. Här ser nu några kanoter från 1800talet och framåt. Kanoterna ligger dock väldigt dåligt till högt upp på en vägg, så det är inte så lätt att filma dom.

    by Bengt Larsson at September 03, 2015 07:32 am

    Gnarlydog News

    Photo: camp at Japanese Gardens

    After one of the most intense days of paddling and sailing in swell against rebound against high cliffs the sheltered camp location we found was stunning. The carefully arranged although natural setting of little ponds and low vegetation reminded me the look of Japanese gardens. more images appear on my photo blog Polished granite slabs make camping easy as nothing gets dirty while sitting

    by gnarlydog (noreply@blogger.com) at September 03, 2015 07:00 am

    September 02, 2015

    Mountain and Sea Scotland
    Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

    Evening variety show - take a bow


    Allan and Lorna arrived soon after I got back into Findochty harbour and we wasted no time in getting out onto the water.  We decided to head east towards Portknockie and the Bow Fiddle Rock, returning to Findochty by sunset.  The distance between the two harbours is only about 5 kilometres, but due to the indented nature of the coast here the distance actually paddled is much more. The rockhopping starts straight away, we threaded through narrow channels.....




    ...and between rock stacks and skerries.  The absence of a swell is an uncommon thing on the Moray Firth coast and we made sure to explore all the intricacy of the rocky coastline which is so often not possible.





    Arriving at the Bow Fiddle Rock from an unusual route behind a rock outcrop, we found it absolutely calm and each paddled it a couple of times......





                                                                                                                    Photo: Allan McCourt

    ....making the most of the benign evening conditions.





    Continuing east brought us to a series of big caves, each with a similar diagonal formation and each possibly on the way to becoming the next Bow Fiddle.  A faint gurgle from a long way back in this cave leads us to suspect that it joins to another one nearby, but it was too narrow to explore the full extent.





    As we turned the headland into Cullen Bay we passed from warm sunshine into shadow, but there was one last cave to explore.






    By far the largest here, not marked on the OS 1:50K map but well known locally as "The Whale's Mou", it's a 100 metre long tunnel which at HW can sometimes be exited at the rear.  I've paddled in this cave numerous times and even used it as a shelter from heavy rain, but it had a surprise in store for us on this occasion.

    As Allan passed under the centre section, along with the usual Pigeons and Shags resident in the cracks of the roof, one narrow diagonal fault erupted into noise and movement as hundreds of Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) emerged and flew out of the cave.  When Lorna and I followed, yet more emerged from the same crack - it must go a considerable way back and it was packed with the birds.  As we paddled out into the evening light again the flock of Starlings took off from the cliffs and performed a small version of a "murmuration" before heading back towards the cave.





    We'd spent longer on the outward leg of our evening paddle than intended - which is often the case on this varied bit of coast!  As we headed back towards Findochty, MRV Alba Na Mara was steaming into Cullen Bay.  Although looking like and indeed mostly performing like a fishing trawler, Alba Na Mara has information as her primary catch as she is the smaller of the two Scottish Government fishery research vessels which gather data on fish and shellfish stocks as well as carrying out environmental assessments for the FRS laboratory in Aberdeen.  Her crew of eight can be supplemented with up to five sceintists and she has onboard laboratories and work areas.  While she works on both west and east coasts, Alba na Mara is quite close to home here in the Moray Firth as she was built at Macduff, just 20 or so kilometres from Cullen Bay.






    We decided that due to the time we'd spent rockhopping and exploring caves on the outward leg, our return paddle would need to be pretty much straight back to Findochty if we weren't to arrive well after dark.  By the time we passed Tronach Head the moon was already bright in the evening sky......






    ....and ahead the embers of a slow sunset silhouetted the houses of Findochty as the Moray Firth took a bow.  We'd been on the water only around three hours and paddled less than 14 kilometres, but what variety we'd enjoyed!

    by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at September 02, 2015 09:41 pm

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Is It Possible to Canoe Over a Car?

    Why, yes. Yes, it is. Especially if you tie your canoe to a second car. Alcohol is recommended before trying this, and you should never actually try it. Just stick to the alcohol.
    Check out the video embedded below:

    by noreply@blogger.com (John Herbert) at September 02, 2015 08:30 pm

    Paddling Otaku
    Otaku is defined as ' a Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests'

    Another step into minimal

    Last year as I was working a stressful job, I think I was struggling to have more connection to my disappearing simple life. About three months into the year I decided to make a change to my wardrobe. I had often read about capsule wardrobes, but I think those work best for women - who have much higher wardrobe demands than men - and men who work in an office. My work, and lifestyle is pretty much  world of simple clothes and t-shirts I had gotten for free - the nature of my work is people give me T-shirts, frequently, and they comprised a large part of my wardrobe. I decided I wanted a uniform. Something I could wear every day, making little or no changes.

    I first got the idea of having a uniform when I read the Isaacson Steve Jobs Book. Jobs got the idea of a uniform from SONY, who after the war had to clothe it's employees. They literally didn't have anything to wear. Over time it became a signature of certain japanese companies, and also created a bond between the employees and the employer. Jobs loved the idea, and tried to implement it at Apple. But his people hated the idea. He still implemented it for himself with the now famous Levi 501's, New Balance Sneakers and Issey Miyake black mock turtleneck shirt.

    Actually, that wasn't when I first got the idea. I first got the idea from the 80's David Cronenberg film "the fly" with Jeff Goldblum. He is asked by his girlfriend played by Geena Davis why he never changes his clothes. He says "what do you mean? I put this on clean this morning." She goes to his closet and sees that he has 7 identical suits, shirts, and shoes. All hanging next to each other in the closet. He says he got the idea from Einstein, so he didn't have to expend any extra thought on what he was going to wear.

    there is another reason to simplify your wardrobe. Decision fatigue. It is why Einstein did it, and probably why Steve Jobs did it. There is a lot of research that says the more decisions you make, the harder it is to make them.

    A quick google search will tell you that many successful silicon valley CEO's wear the same thing everyday. There are countless links to things like "why successful people have a uniform", or "want to simplify your life, wear a uniform". And so about 7 months ago I decided to take the plunge.

    But first, I did some local market research. I started asking people if they saw me in the same clothes everyday if they would think I was A) weird B) disgusting because it would appear I wasn't changing my clothes or C) well... weird. Unanimously, no one thought it was weird or disgusting. A few people wished they could do it. So I took the plunge.

    Naturally it started with a purge. I needed to get rid of the things I wasn't wearing, and boy, I wasn't wearing a lot. Already being pretty minimal my wardrobe wasn't that big, but I did have about double what I needed. So a quick purge and then off to find the right Uniform.

    The shoes and pants were easy. I already wear a minimalist running shoe daily. The Merrel Trail Glove. It is a lot like being barefoot without being barefoot. My Jeans, were Levi 501's - Like Steve but not because of Steve. The shirt was a problem. I couldn't spend near $200 a shirt like Steve, I need something versatile and inexpensive. I settled on a simple Grey T shirt. I am very happy with my uniform.

    In total this is what my "closet" looks like covering both winter and summer.

    3 short sleeve grey T shirts
    3 long sleeve grey T shirts.
    4 black Long sleeve mid weight base layer shirts - this is my winter uniform shirt
    3 pairs of blue levi 501's
    6 pairs of grey running socks
    3 pairs of wool hiking socks
    6 pairs of underwear
    4 pairs long black base layer bottoms
    2 pairs tan hiking shorts

    I do have about 6 random t shirts I haven't parted with yet for either sleeping in, or working around the yard or house. These will slowly get whittled down.

    I do have some oddball things I have kept.
    A pair of Carhartts for working around the house.
    A pair of hiking pants I wear when I teach land courses
    2 pairs of running shorts
    A pair of fleece pants used for expeditioning

    Of course a couple of wool beanie hats for winter, a couple pair of thin gloves. A buff which I wear when I teach. A couple of pieces of outdoor specific clothing - shell jacket, puffy jacket, etc.

    A pair of teva sport sandals, a pair of hiking boots, a pair of running shoes, a pair of dress shoes. In a closet I have a 3 nice dress shirts, a pair of black dress pants, and a couple of blazers.

    All told, my wardrobe is around 50 pieces. I wish it was fewer, but my general rule is if I haven't worn it in six months I get rid of it. I usually go through things when the season changes, If I didn't wear it this summer (which is coming to a close) it is donated.

    This is what works for me, it may not work for you. I have some special work considerations, that both make it easy for me to wear the same thing everyday, and necessitates some very special clothing like a rain shell and a dry suit. If you are delving into a minimalist lifestyle for the first time I think wardrobe is a good easy way to get started.

    by paddlingOTAKU (noreply@blogger.com) at September 02, 2015 06:34 pm

    Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
    A journal of my sea kayak trips.

    September 2nd - Oak and Cadboro Bays (#78)

    I took the Think surf ski out for a morning paddle and enjoyed good conditions. It was  a great way to clear the cobwebs!
    click to enlarge
    12 km, YTD 618 km

    by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at September 02, 2015 06:05 pm

    Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
    Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

    Some Greenland Kayaking Advice

    Having visited Greenland on a number of occasions and paddled close to 1,500 nautical miles along the west coast, there are a few bits of pertinent information, which I have picked up along the way and might prove useful to anybody contemplating a visit to these northern waters.

    Food
    Buy all of your food when you arrive.  It is a waste of time and money shipping food.  Even the smallest villages have a shop where you are able to buy anything from cream cheese to a sewing machine.
    Shop in Saqqaq, northern Disko Bay.
    Mosquito Net
    Take a spare in case you mis-place your first one.  Have it ready to put on as soon as you get off the water.  You may not need it but like a good Boy Scout be prepared.  Remember to remove it when cooking in case the stove flares up, the molten material could make a real mess of somebodies face.
    Some people use a complete bug suit, not just a head net.
    Tipi
    Although it can be a bit of a pain to carry they are a great piece of group equipment.  Perfect for those rare days when the weather isn't good enough to sit outside and ideal for providing some relief when the insects are particularly troublesome.  You can end up spending a significant amount of money on a tipi but I bought a cheaper version in 2009 and it is still going strong.  It can have a significant impact on your luggage allowance so I have left mine in Ilulissat, ready for my next visit.
    Pressure Cooker
    Perfect for helping with fuel economy, bring the rice to the boil and then take it off the flame for between 8 and 10 minutes.  The rice will be cooked to perfection.  They are Ideal for most meals.  It takes a bit of searching to find one with small enough handles that it goes into a kayak hatch, we eventually found a suitable one in a back street in Istanbul.
     Nets off when cooking
     Granite slabs
    Look for the those slabs which have been scoured by the ice, close to the waters edge.  They are perfect at lunch time for relaxing on and hopefully there will be no standing water nearby, which will reduce the insect menace.
    Learning to relax on granite slabs is an essential skill for paddling in the Arctic.
    Down jacket
    The absolute essential item of dry land equipment.  Don't leave home without one.
    Relaxing after a good days paddle along the Vaigat
    Campsites
    Don't always paddle to the rear of the bay.  Think about collecting  plenty of water during the course of the day and camp on a low headland.  The location may be more exposed to wind, which will keep the insects down and the views are likely to be far more spectacular.  This was something which Greenlanders have known about for hundreds of years because quite a few of the low headlands we stopped at had indications of previous habitation.
    A memorable campsite just the north of the abandoned village of Agpat.  There was no standing water nearby and we had a relatively insect free evening.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at September 02, 2015 01:30 pm

    Essex Explorations
    Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

    Steilacoom

    It should be no surprise that I live in the small community of Steilacoom. Although I’ve always enjoyed travel many of my photographs are from right here at home. The advantage of exploring your local area with a camera are many. One, it forces you to look at things not with familiarity but for lines, compisitons, texture etc. and secondly, by photographing the familiar you have a chance to wait for the ‘just perfect’ light. How many times have I paddled by this old BNSF railroad maintence shed? Too many to count!

    BNSF Maintence Station

    Camera Settings

    Steilacoom

    Captain Lafayette Balch, a Maine sea captain, founded Steilacoom in January, 1851. Originally he called it “Port Steilacoom.” A few months afterwards John B. Chapman took a donation claim to the west, naming his town “Steilacoom City.” In 1854 the new territorial legislature incorporated “Steilacoom” combining the two rival towns into one. They were joined by Union Avenue.

    Steilacoom was known as the “town of firsts:” first protestant church north of the Columbia River, first school, first incorporated town, first post office, first brewery, first Pierce County courthouse and jail, and first incorporated library. But as time passed, Tacoma took over Steilacoom’s place. The county seat moved to Tacoma when it became the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Many of the businesses along Commercial Street moved to the bigger town and the population dwindled.

    The close relationship between railroad expansion and the genera development and prosperity of the country is nowhere brought more distinctly into relief than in connection with the construction of the Pacific railroads. – John Moody

    With the introduction of an electric railroad running between Steilacoom and Tacoma in 1891 Steilacoom became known as a tourist destination. Prominent Tacoma businessman built summer cottages looking out to the water and commuted back and forth while others came to enjoy the view and stay a day or two.

    In 1914 the town was torn from the beach as the Northern Pacific Railroad was built along the waterfront and the cottages were either torn down or moved. With the advent of the car, WWI, and the Great Depression, Steilacoom again became a sleepy town. Awakening in the 1940s with the proximity to an expanding Fort Lewis and McNeil Island Penitentiary, houses were constructed to accommodate the growing population

    The post Steilacoom appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

    by Steve Weileman at September 02, 2015 12:35 pm

    Kanotisten.com
    Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

    Canvas inköp

    Fettar på med duk till några kajaker besöker: http://www.raseglarhuset.se/marin/textil

    image

    image

    image

    Postat med WordPress för Android

    by Bengt Larsson at September 02, 2015 11:11 am

    Freya Hoffmeister
    Home of Freya Hoffmeister

    Die nächsten deutschen “THINK BIGGER” Vorträge:

    Hallo! Die nächsten öffentlichen Vorträge über meine Südamerka-Umrundung finden statt:

     

    Im Rahmen der Kanumesse, aber öffentlich für jeden, unterstützt von KANU Magazin:

    Donnerstag 17. September, 20 Uhr, Messezentrum Nünrberg, NCC Ost, 2. Etage, Raum »St. Petersburg«

     

    Im Rahmen der Seekajakwoche, auch öffentlich für jeden:

    Sonntag, 20. September,  19 Uhr, Prora/ Rügen

    by Freya at September 02, 2015 09:35 am

    Frogma
    Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

    Hawaii 2015 Day 4 Part 1 - Pali Lookout Hike, Kailua Beach

    Tuesday the 28th of July, I'd left pretty open. I was up pretty early (I'm not a morning person at ALL here in NYC, but since most of what I wanted to do on O'ahu was outdoors and required daylight, I took advantage of the time change that had me up much earlier than I usually am) and was out the door shortly after 8. First stop was at Snorkel Bob's on Kapahulu Avenue for mask, fins, and snorkel. I wasn't entirely sure of the whole day's plan yet but was I was pretty sure that there would be some snorkeling, probably at Lanikai Beach, which is by some accounts supposed to be the world's most beautiful beach.

    First activity of the day ended up being a short hike on the Old Pali Road. This was kind of on a whim, I hadn't really thought of it until I was coming up on the offramp for the Pali Lookout, but this is another really nice short hike. I haven't really done it justice, treating it as a sort of a nice spur-of-the-moment addition to a day's activities, there are actually a couple of waterfall trails you can get to from the Old Pali Road if you give it a little more time, but once again, it's good to have something to look forward to on another trip trip. As it was, I just followed the old highway down to the new highway and turned around there instead of finding the ladder you use to get under the new highway and continue. It's another really nice easy trail, following the old highway as it does, and very lush and green and jungly, with sweet-smelling ginger to stop and sniff along the way.
    View from the Pali Lookout, looking out towards Kaneohe. As usual, click on any photo for a better view!

    View from the Lookout, looking at the knife-edged cliffs.

    Plaque honoring the 50th anniversary of the old Pali Road, which opened in 1898.

    Katydid and lichens

    Ignore the "Road closed" and "You shall certainly die from rocks falling on your head if you are foolhardy enough to pass this point" to get to the Old Pali Road trail.
    Ease on down, ease on down the road

    Palms

    A better look at the road itself

    Looking back up at the lookout


    Sleeping grass

    Go to sleep, sleeping grass! 

    Ginger - wish I could share the scent

    View again

    Lauhala. This tree's fronds are great for weaving; I actually had a lot of fun getting to try my hand at this myself later in the trip.

    Olomana

    Octopus tree flowers. Wish I'd taken a picture of the entire growth that gives the tree its name - these branches covered with the flowerets grow in splayed multiple clusters, looking like octopuses reaching their arms out from the leaves.
    Looking down at the tunnel that now takes drivers under the Pali. 

    Almost back to the lookout

    Local fauna

    Batcave? No, Catcave

    Handsome feral rooster

    Having worked up a nice appetite hiking, my next stop was Buzz's Kailua for lunch.

    Cool art glass window inside Buzz's
    The only actual tropical drink of my entire trip, mainly chosen in honor of a co-worker who'd told me to drink a foofy drink for her. Special mai tai with pineapple juice - pretty yummy!
    And what I really came for - kiawe wood grilled teriyaki burger, only somehow the chefs at Buzz's labor under the misapprehension that a "burger" is chunks of delicious tender steak on a bun. And I hope nobody ever tells them otherwise!

    And now I needed to take a little time for the mai tai to wear off before I get back behind the wheel, so I walked over to Kailua Beach Park.
    Ama like a bird - wonder if it makes the canoe fly?
    A couple of interesting/entertaining signs on the canoe hale

    Kailua Beach Park
    Hibiscus - and that's it! Next up - first honu encounter of the trip!

    by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at September 02, 2015 05:06 am

    September 01, 2015

    NORCAL YAK
    Northern California kayaking adventures

    Returning to Slab Creek one year after Sierra blaze

    Canyon forest on the one ridge, fire damage on the other side at Slab Creek Reservoir King Fire damage remains, but kayaker access better than ever... It’s been a year since the King Fire...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at September 01, 2015 06:07 pm

    Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
    Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

    Disko Bay - Day 1

    Last year the Jersey Canoe Club ran its 11th Sea Kayak Symposium, which generated some funds for the development of paddle sport.  It was decided to purchase a number of sea kayaks and place them on the west coast of Greenland, which is truly one of the great places to go paddling.
    The kayaks were used for the first time by a Breton group at the beginning of July, read Peter's blog of some of his experiences in Greenland, and then we flew out to start our 18 day journey.  Its very easy to tun out of superlatives when describing the kayaking in Greenland, but hopefully the photographs give a sense of what its like.
    Ilulissat Ice fjord, the most productive glacier in the northern hemisphere lies at the head of this fjord.  Anybody visit Ilulissat, the tourist capital of Greenland should walk to the edge of town to view one of the wonders of the natural world.
    Looking north across Disko Bay.  Our route was heading through all that ice, this was my sixth trip in Greenland but I had never seen this much ice before.  Luckily some of the ice dispersed overnight so the initial part of the journey was slightly easier than we anticipated.  A French group of paddlers leaving a few days after us, took 2 days to get away from Ilulissat because of the ice.
     Alex threading his way through some of the smaller pieces of ice.  The hanging draw is one of the most useful strokes to master in this type of environment.
    Generally when kayaking the ice the water is pretty smooth.  If the wind does pick up and the ice starts to move then a much more challenging situation develops and it is essential to avoid getting trapped by the ice.
     
     Nicky passing the small village of Rodebay.  In 15 days time we will be back to eat at one of my favourite restaurants to be found anywhere, the H8.  Today though we just wanted to press on north to reach the slabs at Anoritoq, where we knew there was a good campsite.
     There were some bigger bergs around and as general rule you need to keep away from them or if you were forced to pass close by be ready to paddle flat out.
    Toby is not as close at it looks, the use of a telephoto lens can completely change the perspective.
     Ice bergs and blue skies eat the memory, of the camera, faster than almost anything else.  As we came towards the end of our first day on the water little did we realize that we wouldn't have a day this warm for the rest of the trip.
     Arriving close to our first nights camp.  The glacial scoured slabs make a great place to camp.  Easy to exit from the kayaks and lift them up above the high water mark and hopefully less bugs because of the reduced amount of standing water.  Also perfect for sitting on and sipping an after paddle Pernod.
     Toby was the youngest member of the group and the person who swam the most, I am not sure the two facts are related.  The sea temperature is barely above freezing.  A memorable end to the first day.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at September 01, 2015 02:56 pm

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Your Squee! For the Day

    Rosie the kitten was just three weeks old when she was found abandoned and sick earlier this year. Her rescuers were not sure she would survive unless they found a surrogate mother, and they found an unlikely one in Lilo the husky dog. It was all the more unexpected because Lilo had never had puppies of her own but Rosie clearly brought out Lilo's mothering instinct. Rosie eventually was adopted by the whole pack of huskies, becoming a bit of an Internet thing a couple of months ago.
    Rosie's latest adventure with her new pack is to enjoy kayaking and paddleboarding. That cat gets on the water more than I do.




    And of course, there's a video:

    by noreply@blogger.com (John Herbert) at September 01, 2015 02:00 pm

    Greenlandorbust.org
    Greenland Or Bust - Helen Wilson & Mark Tozer

    The end of this year’s Nordic Tour

    Sunday was the last day of this year’s Rebel Kayaks supported Nordic Tour, and I have to say that it felt strange. The tour started in Asker, Norway on May 23, and for over three months we’ve ran classes in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. We’ve seen the weather go from cold and snowy to hot and sunny, and now the autumn rain seems to be settling in. We’ve coached over 1,000 students, and have had an absolute blast the entire summer. This was year six of the tour, and we’re already looking forward to a year seven.

    My last BLOG ended with classes in Helsingborg, Sweden, and from there we took a ferry to Denmark and headed to Rungsted for four rolling classes in some incredibly clear water.

    A little yoga is a great way to start a class.

    A little yoga is a great way to start a class.

    In Rungsted we worked on everything from first rolls to forward finish hand rolls.

    We worked on everything from first rolls to forward finishing hand rolls.

    Clear skies and calm water created a very tranquil environment.

    Clear skies and calm water created a very tranquil environment.

    It's nice to stop, reflect and enjoy the sunset.

    It was nice to stop, reflect and enjoy the sunset.

    After leaving Rungsted, we made our way to Frederiksvaerk, also in Denmark. This was our third year running classes here, and over the years we’ve become good friends with the enthusiastic club members. It was great to be back.

    Throughout the two days, I ran four sessions of Simplifying the Roll, while Mark ran technique classes.

    Jacob helped me to anchor the kayaks in a fun teaching spot.

    Jacob helped to anchor the kayaks while everyone hopped into the water.

    We worked on rolls, laughed, played around and had a great couple of days.

    We worked on rolls, laughed, played around and had a great couple of days.

    Participants in Mark's class are smiling… the sign of a great day.

    Participants in Mark’s class are smiling… the sign of a great day.

    We had a little competition to determine who had the best inside edge turn. The winners got Rebel Kayaks buffs.

    We had a little competition to determine who had the best inside edge turn. The winners got Rebel Kayaks buffs.

    Happy paddlers.

    Happy paddlers.

    Saturday evening we went to a local brewery to taste some different types of beer, all of which were very good.

    Saturday evening we went to Halsnaes Bryghus for food and to taste some different types of beer, all of which were very good.

    After saying our goodbyes in Frederiksvaerk, we headed to Copenhagen for a few days of exploration. For us, a visit to Copenhagen always includes a trip to the Inuit display at the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

    One of many fantastic display cases.

    One of many fantastic display cases.

    A display of ulus, or

    A display of ulus, or “women’s knives.”

    It's always fun to look at the paddles, and examine all of the different shapes.

    It’s always fun to examine the different paddle shapes.

    The cockpit shapes are really interesting too.

    The cockpit shapes are really interesting too.

    This well decorated norsaq is one of my favorite objects on display at the museum.

    This well-decorated norsaq is one of my favorite artifacts on display at the museum.

    The upcoming hand line fishing contest at The Traditional Paddlers' Gathering has stirred up quite a bit of interest in Inuit hand lines, so we took some pictures of the ones on display.

    The upcoming handline fishing contest at The Traditional Paddlers’ Gathering has stirred up quite a bit of interest in Inuit handlines, so we took some pictures of the ones on display.

    After

    After “researching” handlines, we headed to Bakken for some brainless fun riding roller coasters and playing games.

    We didn't take pictures from the rides, so here's a different type of picture. What is it that makes sticking your head in a hole for a picture so much fun?

    What is it that makes sticking your head in a hole for a picture so much fun?

    Then we headed to Svendborg, Denmark for the Gronlandsk Symposium, organized by Kajak Inn.

    Both days started with yoga.

    Both days started with yoga.

    Rolling was a great way to cool off during the hot day.

    Rolling was a great way to cool off during the hot day.

    Many participants at the event were working on very advanced rolls, such as the Spine Roll, the Behind the Back Roll and the Straightjacket Roll.

    Many participants at the event were working on very advanced rolls, such as the Behind the Back Roll and the Straightjacket Roll. Here a Spine Roll is born.

    Dubside was also teaching at the event, and it was great to catch up with him.

    Dubside was also coaching at the event, and it was great to catch up with him.

    Greenland Rope Gymnastics were part of the event.

    Greenland Rope Gymnastics were part of the event.

    I ran a Stupid Paddle Tricks race, complete with prizes.

    And I ran a Stupid Paddle Tricks competition, complete with prizes.

    Several people tried out the Rebel Husky, a new kayak that we've been using for the Tour.

    Several people tried out the Rebel Husky, a new kayak that we’ve been using for the Tour.

    A happy camper.

    A happy camper.

    After the symposium we took a ferry to Bornholm, an island far off the coast of Denmark.

    A little down time on a far away island was a really nice vacation.

    A little down time on a far away island was a really nice vacation.

    We enjoyed the view from a lighthouse.

    We enjoyed the view from a lighthouse.

    And visited Hammershus, Scandinavia's largest medieval fortification.

    And visited Hammershus, Scandinavia’s largest medieval fortification.

    We also visited Gaarden, The Bornholm House of Food Culture, which featured a working farm and fresh produce.

    We also visited Gaarden, The Bornholm House of Food Culture, which featured a working farm and fresh produce.

    This napping hedgehog had us a little concerned, but a gentle poke woke him, and he strolled off into a safer location.

    This napping hedgehog had us a little concerned, but a gentle nudge woke him, and slightly irritated with us, he strolled off to a safer location.

    We also went to The Bornholms Birds of Prey Show.

    We also went to The Bornholms Birds of Prey Show.

    The remarkable birds were wonderful to see up close.

    The remarkable birds were wonderful to see up close.

    Mark and I left the island feeling refreshed, rejuvenated and ready for more classes.

    Mark and I left the island feeling refreshed, rejuvenated and ready for more classes.

    Our next stop was in Malmo, Sweden.

    We started the day with Yoga for Paddlers.

    We started the day with Yoga for Paddlers.

    I taught two Simplifying the Roll classes, while Mark taught Simplifying the Rescue and Incident Management.

    Then I taught two Simplifying the Roll classes, while Mark taught Simplifying the Rescue and Incident Management.

    ugliug

    A roll is born.

    One way to move about the canal.

    One way to travel about the canal.

    Mark's class worked on maneuvering strokes.

    Mark demonstrates an inside edge turn.

    Mark takes a break while looking at Oresund Bridge, the bridge that connects Sweden and Denmark.

    Mark takes a break while looking at Oresund Bridge, the bridge that connects Sweden and Denmark.

    Happy paddlers.

    Happy paddlers.

    After a day in Malmo, we headed to Karlshamn, Sweden to run two Simplifying the Roll classes for KajakSyd.

    The classes took place at a beautiful lake in Karlshamn.

    The classes took place at beautiful Lake Langasjon.

    A beautiful roll.

    A perfect roll in crystal clear water.

    Success.

    Success.

    Much to my horror, Mark expressed an interest in trying Surstromming, fermented Baltic Sea herring potent enough to expand the can it comes in.

    Much to my horror, Mark expressed an interest in trying Surstromming, which is fermented Baltic Sea herring potent enough to expand the can it comes in.

    The smell coming from the fish was quite possibly the worst thing that I've ever smelt.

    The smell coming from the fish was, simply put, awful!

    Most people think that the smell is worse than the taste, and when served this way, the flavor blends in. Mark ate his… I had the smallest bite I could take, but enjoyed the other things on the table. Thanks Goran and Veronica for setting up this tasting for us :-)

    Most people that have tried this traditional Swedish dish claim that the smell is worse than the taste, and when served this way, the flavor blends in. Mark ate his… I had the smallest bite I could take, but enjoyed the other things on the table. Thanks Goran and Veronica for setting up this tasting for us :-)

    Thanks to Annette and Preben (Rungsted), Jacob, Lene, Gitte and Soren (Frederiksvaerk), Pernille and Jacob (Svendborg), Anders (Malmo) and Goran and Veronica (Karlshamn) for taking such good care of us during this leg of the tour. Thanks also to everyone that took care of us on previous legs, to Johan Wirsen of Rebel Kayaks and, of course, to everyone that came out for the classes. You all made us feel very welcome, and we really enjoyed our summer. THANK YOU, and see you next year!

    Photos by Mark, Helen and Anders Kristensson.

    by helen at September 01, 2015 09:31 am

    SimonWillis.net
    Cycling, sea kayaking and life in the Scottish highlands

    New Podcast - Toronto

    David Johnston who runs the Paddling HQ website is the guest in this month's podcast.

    David lives and coaches paddling in Toronto, Canada.  In this podcast he picks three great areas which visitors ought to explore.

    Urban paddling out of Toronto itself; East Georgian Bay; and the northern part of Lake Superior.

    Even if, like me, you live nowhere near these places I still urge you to take a listen.  You might not have thought of heading there for a kayaking holiday before, but you you might now.

    Check out the podcast at Sea Kayak Podcasts.com and as usual in iTunes

    by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at September 01, 2015 08:00 am

    kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul
    tid utomhus räknas. Tid i kajaken räknas dubbelt

    Stockenträffen 2015

    Soligt tälthäng i Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT och Hillerberg Saitaris

    Soligt tälthäng i Hilleberg Nallo 3 GT och Hillerberg Saitaris

    Kajakparkering och kajakcamping

    Kajakparkering och kajakcamping

    Alltid trevlig att komma till Stocken och Stockenträffen. Blir oftast en bra mix av gamla och nya paddlare, nybörjare och erfarna, vågtokar och plattvattenmysare och allt därimellan och kombinationer.

    Så även i år.

    Vi landade på Stocken vid 17-snåret efter en seg färd genom ett köfyllt Göteborg och Bohuslän. Blev snabbt tjöt och snack och så småningom hakade vi på MestUtegänget för lite mat i Ellös då Stockens camping inte orkade öppna upp på fredagen. Den ena pizzerian tog inte kort :) nästa ställe tog kort men killen såg lite chockad ut och påpekade att det nog kunde ta lite tid. Vi fick både mat och dryck. Lite bildvisning på Stocken efter det och sen snack under fullmånen ett tag innan vi somnade sött i tältet. Hade varit skapligt blåsigt under fredagen så det hade varit lite motigt ut till Vallerö under dagen och rejält med vågor och skum därute.

    Lite blåsigt kring tältet under natten och några skurar men vi vaknade till solig morgon. Långfrukost vid tältet och sen lite span och foto när alla andra gav sig iväg, TjörnKajakturarna var ett rejält gäng och det hjälmprydda MestUtegänget var nästan lika många.

    Jette redo för nya turer

    Jette redo för nya turer

    Sjösättning, många ska i och vem ska med vem

    Sjösättning, många ska i och vem ska med vem

    Kajakdräll och kajaksnack

    Kajakdräll och kajaksnack

    Kerstin

    Kerstin

    Finfärgad kajak :)

    Finfärgad kajak :)

    Så småningom paddlade vi också utåt tillsammans med Daniel och Lars, mot Hermanö huvud, lite segt i motvinden men inte såå farligt. I Champagneviken finfint, vi kände lite på skummet innan vi satte oss läigt vid gräset en bit upp, där satt vi länge och fikade, lunchade, tjötade. Så småningom kom EpicAnders förbi och vi satt kvar ett tag till. Trevligt och gött i solen med finvy.

    Daniel på väg ut mot Hermanö

    Daniel på väg ut mot Hermanö

    Lars på väg mot Hermanö

    Lars på väg mot Hermanö

    Hermanöfika

    Hermanöfika

    Anders

    Anders

    Anders, Pia och Daniel

    Anders, Pia och Daniel

    Ibland lämnar Andreas skogen och ler i vågorna

    Ibland lämnar Andreas skogen och ler i vågorna

    Daniel letar surf

    Daniel letar surf

    Anders i Epic V7 med Måseskär i bakgrunden

    Anders i Epic V7 med Måseskär i bakgrunden

    Anders letar surf och skum

    Anders letar surf och skum

    Besök från Stockeboda

    Besök från Stockeboda

    Stockeboda den yngre generationen

    Stockeboda den yngre generationen

    Lars nosar på skummet

    Lars nosar på skummet

    Pia och Måseskär

    Pia och Måseskär

    Pia är glad

    Pia är glad

    Lite uppförsbacke

    Lite uppförsbacke vid Hermanö huvud.

    Richard från sydsverige dyker upp överallt :)

    Richard från Lundakrokarna dyker upp överallt :)

    Skumt och plaskigt vid Hermanö huvud

    Skumt och plaskigt vid Hermanö huvud

    Klart man vill bada på riktigt oxå!

    Klart man vill bada på riktigt oxå!

    Sen lite fotosession i skummet innan vi drog oss bort mot Vallerö, kul kring stenarna precis söder om Hermanö och sen lite mer regelbundna vågor bortåt Vallerö. Lite våglek och sen gick vi iland för ett bad, sen lite mer vågkänning innan vi drog oss inåt igen. Go eftermiddag och kväll. Hamburgare på restaurangen och så lite bildvisning på det och vidare tjöt.
    mat-stocken

    Söndagsmorgonen bjöd på mera sol och mindre vind, efter frukost tog Jag & Pia en runda i Epics tvåmanssurfski, 760cm lång! Klart vippigt till att börja med men sen kändes det bra. Nu är vi väl mer sugna på en båt med sittbrunnar än en birk men man vet aldrig och kul att prova. Sen blev det en sväng med lite andra kajaker innan vi började packa ihop, tar ju några timmar när man vill snacka med alla :)

    Campingmys

    Campingmys

    Söndagsmorgon från toppen. Lite utplockat redan

    Söndagsmorgon från toppen. Lite utplockat redan. En del är ute och paddlar och en del har redan lämnat Stockenträffen för denna gången.

    Lång även på land

    Lång även på land

    Som sagt, mycket trevligt. Vädret såg lite risigt ut några dagar innan men det rättade till sig och var sol mest hela dagarna. Perfekt! Tror inte nån räknade så noga men det var säkert 60-70 eller kanske tillochmed 80 paddlare på plats. Platsen är verkligen perfekt för kajakträff, bra skyddade paddelvatten oavsett vindriktning, camping med både tält, stug och husvagn/husbilsmöjlighet, restaurang, liten butik med mera. Och så nästan alltid lite skum och busigt vatten på utsidan. Dessutom trevliga utflyktsmöjligheter med både Gullholmen, Hermanö, Käringön, Måseskär, Grundsund med mera på kort avstånd.

    Stockenträffen har varit utan arrangör ett tag men har ändå lockat skapligt med paddlare sista helgen i augusti. I år hade Tjörn Kajakklubb och Stocken Camping tagit på sig att arrangera lite. Men det behöver ju inte arrangeras så mycket, räcker långt med tid och plats. Men visst tusan är det bra att t.ex. Tjörn kör lite organiserade turer, bra sätt att lära känna nya, de som varit där innan klumpas ju ofta ihop i gamla bekantskapsgrupper där det inte är helt lätt att ta sig in. Underligt bara att inte Orust Kajak är intresserade, de har förvisso butiken öppen men med pyttelitet sortiment. Undrar hur många butiker som inte tar tillvara att 50-100 potentiella storkunder tältar ett par dygn utanför butiken…

    Se bilder från tidigare Stockenträffar

    Paddlar långkajak! Epic V10 Double

    Paddlar långkajak! Epic V10 Double

     

    Inlägget Stockenträffen 2015 dök först upp på kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul.

    by Erik Sjöstedt at September 01, 2015 04:45 am

    Have Kayaks Will Travel
    Paddlesport Coaching

    What a difference a drysuit makes

    Rescues (6 of 6)

    We’re accustomed to thinking about drysuits as garments that provide physical comfort. In fact, they also have a strong psychological effect.

    We saw this in action during a course this past weekend, when the water was cold and a little bit bumpy. One of our students had no drysuit, so we brought one for him and encouraged him to wear it. At first, this unfamiliar garment was a little bit uncomfortable, with its latex wrist and neck gaskets. But he got used to it and had a productive day on the water, including plenty of time in the water working on rescues.

    At the end of the day, he told us that knowing he wouldn’t get cold if he fell in the water enabled him to work on the rescues, and working on the rescues made him feel less fearful of capsizing. Feeling less fearful of capsizing allowed him to be looser in his boat and use more of an edge during his turns. In other words, the psychological comfort provided by the drysuit facilitated better performance.

    As coaches, we think about T-T-P-P every time we coach. Those letters stand for the technical, tactical, physical and psychological components of learning paddlesports, which are all essential and interrelated. It’s easy to focus too much on the technical (how to execute a stroke or maneuver), the tactical (how to vary it in response to conditions) and the physical (flexibility, stamina, strength) and overlook the psychological, but a student’s mental comfort and concentration are critical to their learning and accomplishment.

    by havekayakswilltravel at September 01, 2015 03:21 am

    Sea Kayak Podcasts .com
    Interviews with interesting sea kayakers

    Toronto

    Interviews with the world's most interesting sea kayakers. More than seventy free mp3 interviews online at SeaKayakPodcasts.com

    by Simon Willis (simon@sunartmedia.com) at September 01, 2015 12:30 am

    August 31, 2015

    The Dash Point Pirate
    I love wooden kayaks

    JF Marleau: Surf's Up in Pedder Bay?

    JF Marleau: Surf's Up in Pedder Bay?! from Andrew Elizaga on Vimeo.

    Sea kayaking instructor and guide JF Marleau talks about teaching surfing and demonstrates stern rudder and carving on waves in Pedder Bay at the 2015 Pacific Paddling Symposium. JF is a resident of Ucluelet, BC, and is the author of "Kayaking the Broken Group Islands. The Essential Guidebook".

    by aelizaga at August 31, 2015 10:57 pm

    KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak » KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak

    Kajakprøver

    31. august 2015

    Deltog i kajakprøver ved Holbæk Kajakklub i både EPP og Havkajakroer-systemerne. Bestod i begge :-)

    Der er ingen billeder, da mit kamera druknede igår. Det kommer vist ikke til at virke igen…

    Rute: Ved Holbæk Kajakklub
    Isætning: 55° 43.246’N  11° 43.460’Ø
    Optagning: —”—
    Distance roet:  0 km
    Vejr: 17 grader. Vind 5 m/s fra Ø.

    by KajakGal at August 31, 2015 07:41 pm

    Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
    Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

    Portelet Pizza

    For a number of years the old beach cafe at Portelet gradually crumbled through disuse, it's decline seemingly linked to the closure of the holiday camp, which used to dominate the cliff top above and the associated drop in the number of visitors to the beach.
    This year has seen the refurbishment of the building and its reopening as a pizza place and the Jersey Canoe Club decided to visit the Portelet Bay Cafe for lunch on the last day of August.  A paddle from Ouaisne allowed us to visit some of the historical sites, which exist along this section of coast.
    This was followed by a very pleasant break at Portelet Bay Cafe, the pizzas are highly recommended, and the paddle back assisting with their digestion.  Considering it was a rather grey day with an increasing north westerly wind we think we made pretty good use of the time.

     Leaving from Ouaisne is always fascinating as we pass close to La Cotte de St Brelade, which is one of the most important neanderthal sites in north west Europe.  Within the ice age sediments there are thousands of stone tools in addition to the bones of their prey.
     To the south lies the small stack of La Cotte Island, which has a number of short climbs on its west face.
     The first major headland is Pt Le Fret.  It is fully exposed to the Atlantic swell but today it was all calm and we able to thread our way through the gullies.  Earlier this year the swell so large that we had to keep about 200 metres out, when rounding the point.
     Noirmont Tower was completed in 1814 to help protect the southern coast of the island from potential invasion by the French.  Today the lighthouse marks the western approach to St Helier.
     Nicky passing in front of Batterie Lothringen, part of a World War 2 coastal battery.  The first part was completed in 1941 but this tower was built April and October 1943.
     On the beach at Portelet, after our pizza's.  Today was a particularly large spring tide, when we had landed less than 2 hours before, we left our kayaks at the waters edge.
     Another Jersey round tower, it was completed 6 years earlier than the nearby one at Noirmont, in 1806.  A sergeant and 12 soldiers manned the tower, it must have been rather crowded.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at August 31, 2015 06:36 pm

    CackleTV
    snippets of life from an adventure filmmaker

    Rent our films now!

    “Adventure Kayak” magazine’s last editorial (above) described how the editor was introduced to my first sea kayaking film, “This is the Sea”, 10 years ago. The editor kindly goes on to say that, 10 years later, the storylines still stand up to scrutiny – even if cameras and editing software has marched ahead in that […]

    by Justine at August 31, 2015 03:54 pm

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Clover Point Wastewater Discharge

    Paddlers wanting to launch near Clover Point should take notice! Word has come from the Capital Regional District about an untreated sewage spill at Clover Point on Saturday, August 29.
    Here's a quote from the CRD notice on their website pages:


    For Immediate Release
    August 29, 2015
    Clover Point Wastewater Discharge Notice
    Victoria, BC
    Signs have been posted as a precautionary measure due to a wastewater discharge at
    Clover Point on the afternoon of Saturday, August 29, 2015.
    Approximately 900 m3 of unscreened wastewater was discharged through the Clover Point pumpstation short outfall as a result of a mechanical equipment failure. The failure has since been corrected and the pumpstation is operating as it should.
    In consultation with Island Health, water sampling at locations along the beaches near Clover Point will take place this weekend and public health advisory signs have been posted at all beach access points in the Ross Bay
    and Clover Point areas. Lab results from the weekend samples should be available early
    next week and if enterococci levels are below the 70CFU/100mL recreational limit the signage will be
    removed.
    For media inquiries please contact:
    Ted Robbins, General Manager,
    CRD Integrated Water Service
    Office 250.360.3061

    by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at August 31, 2015 03:30 pm

    NORCAL YAK
    Northern California kayaking adventures

    Kayaking paradise found, then nearly lost to fire

     Before the fire, a typical view of Slab Creek Reservoir along the south shoreline There are many kayaking venues in Northern California with spectacular scenery, but perhaps only one where the...

    [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

    by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at August 31, 2015 02:23 pm

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Big ol' fish and good ol' boys

    The winds yesterday were done today. Time for another short paddle on Poirier Lake, a pleasant little lake. There were intermittent flashes of sunshine breaking through the clouds, but a patter of rain started just as Bernie carried the red Pamlico down to the brand-new boat dock. It was a nice warm rain shower, off and on for the next hour, as I paddled in lazy circuits round the little lake.
    Bernie walked to the brand-new fishing dock and set up his rod and reel. Before long he waved me over to the dock. "My line is caught on that sunken log again," he said. "First cast!" It wasn't hard to free the hook so he could cast again.
    Twice I saw a fish break the surface, several minutes apart, and not a little tiny fish. Once the water was disturbed near enough that I could see the white shape of a fish that looked about two feet long. It was probably smaller, but it sure seemed like a big ol' fish.
    Drifted and paddled some more, listening to white guy funky rock on a radio outside a house at one end of the lake. A very retro station. Then back to shore and home to the little house.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at August 31, 2015 10:48 am

    Extreme Sea Kayaking Adventures
    Exploring the Pacific Ocean Coast of California and Oregon

    A Paddler’s Journey by Bryant Burkhardt – Review

    An adventure is an outing where the outcome is uncertain. – Bryant Burkhardt This book does not disappoint. Bryant has done it all, from dodging icebergs in Alaska and exploring the Channel Islands to creeking in L.A. and captaining the U.S. National Kayak Polo Team. His kayaking resume is truly amazing. It’s a testament to […]

    by Nancy Soares at August 31, 2015 07:45 am

    August 30, 2015

    Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
    Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

    Les Dirouilles

    To the north east of Jersey there are two reefs, Les Ecrehous and Les Dirouilles.  Without doubt the most popular area of this Ramsar site is Les Ecrehous but today our destination was Les Dirouilles.  
    It was a large Spring Tide and although the tidal streams were running with significant energy we were able to use some of the speed to our advantage.  It was at times like this that confidence in the GPS is important, monitoring our drift and fine tuning of our bearing ensured that we weren't swept past the rocks.
    Very little has been written about the reef but it is known that in 1816 40 people were drowned when a ship, La Balance, which was sailing from St Malo to Canada struck the reef.  It must have been in totally different conditions to those we experienced on the reef today.
    The calm waters, fast moving streams and lack of any other people combined to produce a truly memorable day.
     Approaching Les Dirouilles.  When we left Jersey the tidal streams were running at over 4 knots, fortunately they were mainly in our favour.
     Pete is just visible threading his way through one of the numerous channels.
     Janet with a rather large smile, after a superb crossing from Jersey.
     Landing wasn't straightforward but it was a great place to swim.
     A very sheltered pool!  There can't be many days like this at Les Dirouilles.
     Looking north across the reef.  Next stop Alderney, about 30 miles away.

    Although we were on the reef for only about an hour, the tide had dropped over a metre, and this wasn't at the time of maximum change.  The tidal range today was 11 metres.
    Time to hitch a ride on the flooding tide back to St Catherine's.  At times our speed over the ground was over 7 knots.  The joy of a free ride!

    by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at August 30, 2015 08:38 pm

    Padlemia
    En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

    Helgeland, del 7 - Hestmona(ish) til Kvarøy

    Del 1 av helgelandsturen ligger HER og del 2 ligger HER, del 3 finner du HER, del 4 ligger HER og del 5 ligger HER og del 6 ligger HER.

    Ja, da var vi kommet til episoden der vi våknet på den lille øya rett nord for Hestmona-ish. Her er vi nesten alle mann alle, foruten Nils-Jakob som sov som en stein. Jeg holdt meg lenge i teltet selv, for jeg hørte ikke at noen var stått opp. Sendte melding til NJ og spurte om de andre var våkne – men intet svar å få. (Forståelig nok, fant jeg ut etterpå. Svaret var ja, alle var våkne – foruten akkurat ham.) Til slutt sto jeg opp likevel, og da var resten av folket i full frokost under tarpen.

    Det var gråvær fremdeles, ikke idelt for solcellepanel akkurat. Men perfekt vær for å teste ut nettopp hvordan panelet lader i gråvær. Jeg la det inni kartmappa for å holde det tørt, og så brettet jeg det ut over dekk. Testing testing.

    Etter hvert var vi alle våknet, og klare til å dra videre på tur. Neste camp var Inner-Kvarøya, etter planen.

    Wrooom! Ambulansebåten hadde det rimelig travelt til Hestmona. Fyren i seilbåten var veldig opptatt av polarsirkelen, han møtte ikke helt den store entusiasmen hos oss nordboere. Og dessuten – var dette der polarsirkelen går nå, eller der den står på ett eller annet x antall år gammelt kart? Den vandrer jo rundt, den der sirkelen. (Du kan ha fått det med deg på tv.) Vi kunne brydd oss mer, men han fikk nå bekreftet at joda, det er sikkert polarsirkelen her.

    Vi padlet videre. Kanskje skulle vi innom ei grotte i dag, det er jo kult. Ikke ei sånn grotte som man kan padle inn i, noe som er enda kulere, men det var kult nok.

    For de har ganske kul stein her. Noe ser bare ut som et troll har slengt stein vilt rundt seg (det er de jo truende til), noe ser ut som det er flerret opp og annet er blandings av kule steinsorter. Meteorolog hadde vi med oss, men jeg hadde i grunnen ønsket meg en geolog også. For her var det helt sikkert veldig masse å lære.

    Dagens rute. Gratiskart, så det er ikke allverdens. Når det gjelder navnet Hestmona så er dette et sammensurium som forvirret enkelte en del i løpet av turen. For hele navnesaken kan man lese HER om man er særlig interessert.

    Kort – i mars i fjor ble det gjort vedtak etter klagesak på navnet. Fjellet skal hete både Hestmonkallen og Hestmannen. Nordlig del av øya heter Storselsøya, den sørlige Hestmona. Og øynavnet (undernavn) er Selsøya.

    Om noen ikke ble klokere av dette, har jeg full forståelse for det…

    Hestmannen, blir det den smale tingen som stikker opp her, eller?

    Gråvær, men helt stille hav. Største bevegelsen vi fikk var vel den ambulansebåten…

    Veldig, veldig stille. Rolig padling, med god tid til å nyte naturen rundt oss.

    Nå nærmer vi oss grotta.

    Fotografering må til stadig vekk.

    For nemlig, nå hadde vi funnet grotta! Den så ganske kul ut allerede på avstand.

    Foto: Gunnar Noer
    Rollebytte.

    Den var ganske stor, den hula. Padler på vei oppover markert i rød ring.

    Det var litt ulendt å gå opp et stykke, men mesteparten gikk greit. En smule varmt å gå opp i padleklær, men...

    Ser du padleren her? Hula var delt i to løp, det ene gikk ganske langt innover her.

    Her er hvorfor vi ikke gikk samlet opp. Det var ikke akkurat strand å gå i land på. Med fullastede kajakker ble det et lite styr, men vi kom oss både i land og ut igjen.

    Foto: Nils-Jakob Schelderup
    Mye stein slengt rundt bortover her.

    Foto: Nils-Jakob Schelderup
    Her var det et kult overheng. Men hva er det jeg holder på med?

    Foto: Nils-Jakob Schelderup
    Ingen anelse.

    Det stilige overhenget litt på avstand.

    Mer kul stein.

    Sånn ser øya ut fra andre siden. Nå var vi begynt å lete etter lunsjplass. Det var imidlertid ikke bare å finne.

    Her har vi akkurat hatt en snackpause med blant annet tørket mango, og bestemt oss sånn høvelig for å padle fram til camp. På den ene øyen var det et dyr som sprang, ganske opptatt av oss. Men hva det var for et dyr, fant jeg ikke ut av. En stor, svart hund?

    Plutselig traff vi på et par padlere. Igjen ble vi gjort oppmerksomme på Polarsirkelen, det skulle visstnok stå et merke inne på land. Ok. Det er en stor greie, denne sirkelen?

    Så traff vi på en gjeng med turister. (Går vi ut ifra, siden de fisker med stang på merkelig sted.) Nå var vi rimelig sultne folk, ble ikke mindre sulten av å tenke på et herlig fiskemåltid kjente jeg.

    Turleder Gunnar prøvde å ta affære, og ringte en restaurant til ingen nytte. Niks åpent. (Men vi kommer vel neppe til å nevne at vi er padlere neste gang vi ringer. Just in case det gjør en forskjell.)

    Jaja, ikke noe å gjøre med det, humøret var i behold likevel. Vi har da mat selv, det skal ikke stå på det. Nå må vi bare finne leirplass.

    Teambilde.

    Så fant vi en strand. Njet. Vi fant en strand til. Njet. Og så padlet vi til et tredje sted og konkluderte med at njet, vi padler tilbake til det første stedet. Det var best.

    Så, logisk nok - padlet vi tilbake til sted nr 2? Ja. Her var det langgrunt som vi ser. Veldig. Jaja, vi måtte i land og campe nå snart.

    Foto: Nils-Jakob Schelderup
    Så, vi bærte en kajakk helt inn, og konkluderte med at det var jæklig langt. Så oss litt rundt, og fant ut at nei dette var egentlig ikke så god ide. (Og imens falt vel sjøen enda mer.) Så vi begynte å bære ut igjen, for å padle dit vi egentlig var ment å dra.

    Foto: Nils-Jakob Schelderup
    Men så kom NJ som hadde vært oppå haugen og sett, og mente at det var like langgrunt på det andre stedet. Jeg gadd ikke gå opp på haugen for å kunne påpeke at det var feil, så det var bare å sette i gang bæreaksjonen og sette opp telt på kjipt sted. Det meste ville vært samme sak på sted 1, bortsett fra bæringa – den ville blitt kortere.

    Sånn her langt var det. Helt typisk opplegg når folk er blitt både slitne og sultne, over grensen. Da blir det fort litt rot – men det er jo ingen krise når det skjer på land.

    Ikke spesielt fin sandbunn heller, for den del.

    Det var nå jeg fant ut at jeg vil ha nytt telt. Jeg trenger ett som er selvstående, for det var på håret at jeg klarte å få det satt opp her. Og her konkluderte jeg også med at nei, jeg er ingen ukesturpadler. Nå var alt vått og fullt av sand og det var fortsatt gråvær. Langhelg holder for min del, da er det på tide få vasket og tørket ting. Og på toppen av det hele – de andre ville padle MELLOM Lurøya. Faen. Jaja, først var det å få i seg mat, og da fikk vi på ny demonstrert tarpferdighetene til disse Tromsø-folka. Og etter hva værmeldinga antydet, var jeg spent på hvilke forhold vi kom til å våkne opp til. Solcellepanelet ladet for øvrig helt greit, men så hadde det vært en lang dag også så det burde det.

    Den som leser får se.

    by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 07:55 pm

    Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
    A journal of my sea kayak trips.

    August 30th - Jemmy Jones (#77)

    I managed to get out for a second "paddle" today. This time I took the Oarboard SUP for a row out to Jemmy Jones. Given the sore muscles and blisters, this definitely uses different systems than kayaking! An interesting side effect of going backwards is that you see how many seals follow you! Downside is that you aren't looking where you are going! :)
    click to enlarge
    5 km, YTD 606 km

    by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 06:52 pm

    Pagayeur d'Iroise

    Je me la pète

    Il y a peu j'ai posté un Compte Rendu d'une de mes sorties pêche du bord. Certains l'auront surement lu sur ma page Facebook.
    C'est un CR normal d'une sortie normale que tout le monde aurait pu faire. Mais après l'avoir relu je me suis dit qu'il y manquai sa version plus, comment dire??? Pro voilà c'est le terme. Et là j'ai repensé à tout ces CR que je peux lire sur l'incontournable réseau social que nous fréquentons. Et qui deviennent vite indigeste à force.

    Dans un premier temps je vous remets la version originale à la suite viendra la version remastérisée. Vous pourrez ainsi faire le parallèle. Je me suis simplement inspiré de vous tous petits et grands, copains ou pas. C'est juste ironique jamais méchant alors ne vous vexez pas si vous vous reconnaissez dans certains passages... c'est un peu voulu.

    En fait je ne suis sponsorisé par personne et c'est pas plus mal. A moins que de bénéficier d'une remise de 10% dans un magasin suffise à me faire rentrer dans cette catégorie des semi-pro.
    Je ne fais que pêcher sans prétentions techniques particulières. Mes CR ne ressemblent pas à des énumérations sans fin de page de catalogue. Je ne m'exhibe pas avec les casquettes ou les T-Shirts de telles ou telles marques sur les réseaux sociaux.
    Je fais un truc tout bête.....je pêche pour moi par plaisir. Pour celui aussi de partager avec quelques copains en toute simplicité.

    Si un jour je cède aux sirènes du sponsoring c'est qu'il y aura derrière une activité professionnelle réelle et  non imaginaire.

    Mais même là je ne saurais changer. "Je ne me la pèterais pas"

    ----------------------------------
    Il y avait longtemps que je n'avais pas croisé d'imbécile à la pêche.
    Chose faites.
    C'est vrai que depuis un bon moment j'évitais d'aller à Saint Anne du Portzic c'est surement pour cela.
    Pour ceux qui connaissent je suis allé y faire un tour l'autre soir pour taquiner le calamar qui est présent en ce moment.
    Comme il y avait du vent et que la marée était un peu trop basse je suis allé me poster sur la digue en pierre en face du mole. Histoire d'être à l'abri et pas trop haut par rapport à l'eau.
    Deux pêcheurs quand à eux y étaient n'étant pas gêné par le vent ni la hauteur du quai au vu des "poutres" qu'ils utilisaient comme canne à pêche.
    Chacun pêchant dans sa zone nous ne nous gênions pas.
    Eux aux maquereaux moi aux calamars.
    Au bout d'un petit moment ne voilà-t-il pas que je ferre mon premier tube gluant. Pendant que je le ramenais tranquillement au bord l'imbécile de service voyant ma canne fortement courbée décide de lancer au même endroit que moi.
    Bien sur sans savoir ce que j'avais ramené.
    Le temps qu'il pose sa bière et prenne sa canne je mets au sec le calamar et relance. Il ne trouve rien de mieux que de balancer sa mitraillette (6 plumes plus un snack de 80g que je verrais plus tard en lui rendant visite) sur ma ligne.
    Donc coup de gueule de ma part, excuses de la sienne "il m'avait pas vu". Prends moi pour un abruti ça ira plus vite.
    Il remballe son matos et retourne à sa bière sans m'avoir accroché au passage. Une chance pour lui n'étant pas du genre patient en ce moment j'aurais inauguré une nouvelle boite à gifle avec plaisir rien que pour lui.
    Je me demande si la bière et la pêche vont ensemble à partir d'une certaine quantité et n'altère point le jugement de bon nombre de pêcheur.

    ----------------------------------

    Il y avait longtemps que je n'avais pas croisé d'imbécile à la pêche.
    Chose faites.
    C'est vrai que depuis un bon moment j'évitais d'aller à Saint Anne du Portzic, située 48°21'43.0"N 4°33'13.8"W .
    Pour ceux qui connaissent je suis allé y faire un tour l'autre soir pour taquiner le calamar qui est présent en ce moment.

    Donc je m'y rendis au volant de mon véhicule 206HDI modèle 2000 couleur grise chaussée de pneumatique Michelin qui a vaillamment fait le job en gravissant la dernière cote à 3% menant à ce spot.
    Et là revêtu de mon blouson D4 noir sans capuche au logo de mon partenaire Navikayak, que je remercie de tout cœur, casquette publicitaire du Télégramme de Brest vissée sur la tête, Lunettes polarisantes ALAGOA MAT sur le nez je préparais mon matériel dans la plus grande des concentrations. Il ne s'agit pas de se tromper dans le choix cornélien qui se présentait à moi.

    Ayant passé une partie de l'après midi à étudier la météo et faisant le vide au plus profond de moi.

    Je sortis donc ma canne Emaraldas Daiwa EMST 86 MAF sur lequel est monté un Moulinet Daiwa Infeet Emeraldas 2506 garni de Tresse Daiwa Tournament 8 Braid Accudepth 16/100, bas de ligne fluorocarbone 23/100 VARIVAS SHOCK LEADER EGING d'une longueur de 80cm.
    Dans mon SAC CEINTURE STREET DAIWA DF1204 je mis mes Egi Yamashita #2.5 #3.0 EGI-O Q Live RWKM, BOKP, BPOK, BRPK, pour n'en citer que quelques uns parmi les 258 que je possède afin de couvrir toutes les cas de figure dans cette marque.
    Comme il y avait du vent, 20 noeuds de SSO avec des rafales à 25 noeuds et que la marée était un peu trop basse je suis allé me poster sur la digue en pierre en face du mole. Choisissant un poste situé à 1.63m au dessus de la mer. Histoire d'être à l'abri et pas trop haut par rapport à l'eau. En effet vu la finesse de mon équipement je ne peux me permettre d'avoir une trop grande hauteur de quai. Le blank de ma canne Emaraldas Daiwa EMST 86 MAF aurait du mal à le supporter.

    Deux pêcheurs quand à eux y étaient n'étant pas gêné par le vent ni la hauteur du quai au vu des "poutres" qu'ils utilisaient comme canne à pêche.
    Chacun pêchant dans sa zone nous ne nous gênions pas. Eux aux maquereaux moi aux calamars.


    Je commençais donc à lancer mon leurre, canne 45° arrière, léger coup de poignée afin d'avoir une accélération optimum pour une petite distance de 12.56m, laissant couler mon Egi à une profondeur de 3.75m tout en pratiquant le Bichi-Bachi, technique ancestrale japonaise. Au bout d'un petit moment ne voilà-t-il pas que je ferre mon premier tube gluant. Le blank carbone haut module de mon Emaraldas Daiwa EMST 86 MAF sur lequel est monté un Moulinet Daiwa Infeet Emeraldas 2506 garni de Tresse Daiwa Tournament 8 Braid Accudepth 16/100, un bas de ligne fluorocarbone 23/100 VARIVAS SHOCK LEADER EGING d'une longueur de 80cm plia fortement. Pendant que je le ramenais tranquillement au bord je n’éprouvais que du bonheur de voir qu'elle a une fois de plus fait le job. Je me trouvais presque dans un état second au bord de l'extase.
    L'imbécile de service voyant ma canne fortement courbée décide de lancer au même endroit que moi.
    Bien sur sans savoir que j'avais ramené un magnifique calmar commun, aussi appelé selon les régions encornet, chipiron (Pays basque) ou supion dans le Midi (Loligo vulgaris) qui est une espèce de grand calmar, appartenant à la famille des loliginidés, dont on distingue deux sous-espèces.
    Le temps qu'il pose sa bière pas fraiche d'une grande marque française que je ne saurais recommander de consommer avec modération et prenne sa canne je mets au sec le calmar et relance. Il ne trouve rien de mieux que de balancer sa mitraillette (6 plumes plus un snack de 80g que je verrais plus tard en lui rendant visite) sur ma ligne.
    Donc coup de gueule de ma part, excuses de la sienne "il m'avait pas vu". Prends moi pour un abruti ça ira plus vite.
    Il remballe son matos et retourne à sa bière sans m'avoir accroché au passage. Une chance pour lui n'étant pas du genre patient en ce moment j'aurais inauguré une nouvelle boite à gifle avec plaisir rien que pour lui.
    Je me demande si la bière et la pêche vont ensemble à partir d'une certaine quantité et n'altère point le jugement de bon nombre de pêcheur.

    Je continuais à pêcher et point de No-Kill tout en Catch et No Release je remplis ainsi mon seau comme un gros viandard.

    Je ne saurais vous recommander la lecture de cet article écrit par mon mentor, celui qui m'a tout appris dans son infini sagesse sans qui je ne serais rien en ce bas monde. Margatte et Chipiron

    Demain je vais aller aux Fish voir si les Seabass sont présent à défaut je me rabattrais sur les Labrax. Un lunker manque à mon riche palmarès cette année. Pour le moment je n'ai fais que des 60 up je ferais bien un 90 down.

    Allez Let's go to my bungalow..... il est tard

    Je tenais à remercier #Peugeot#Daiwa#Yamashita#Décathlon#La Station de  carburant de Carrefour#Le seau de colle vide récupéré chez Brico Dépôt#Ifremer pour avoir construit la digue de St Anne du Portzic en 1970.
    mes excuses à tous ceux que j'oublie sans qui cette sortie n'aurait pu se faire.




    by Pagayeur d'Iroise (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 06:38 pm

    KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak » KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak

    Skuldelev til Eskilsø

    30. august 2015

    Jeg havde egentligt planlagt at komme ud på vandet lørdag, men høstfest i byen lagde lidt beslag på bilen, da Rikkes fodboldhold solgte pandekager til støtte for deres tur til Barcelona og der skulle laves dej. Den skulle jo transporteres hen til hovedgaden. Over 300 pandekager fik de vist langet over disken, så der kom lidt penge på kontoen.

    Så turen blev i dag søndag, lidt mere overskyet vejr, men stadig fint og sammen med seks andre fra Kajakflokken Malik. Vi stod ud fra Skuldelev for at ro mod Eskilsø. Mens de sidste blev klar til at komme på vandet, ville jeg tage et undervandsbilede af en flot brandmand. Så jeg valgte et undervandsprogram på kameraet og sænkede kameraet ned i vandet. Men hov. Det boblede fra kameraet. Op igen og skandalen var klar. Jeg havde ikke lukket batteridækslet ordentligt. Kameraet var druknet og fyldt af saltvand. Nu må vi se, om det kan tørres tilbage til livet.

    IMG_0019

    Turen mod Eskilsø var i næsten helt vindstille og med spejlblank overflade. Det var helt fantastisk, men  det har jeg jo så ingen billeder af. Jeg trænede lidt telemarksvendinger, 360 graders vendinger, baglænsroning og lave støttetag på vejen. Ved Østby roede vi over til nordkanten af Eskilsø for at gå i land. Det var en del både i sejlrenden, så vi krydsede lige over. Efter lidt roning i lavt vand, gik vi på land for at spise frokost ved klosterruinen. Oppe ved ruinen var der en samling af historieinteresserede, der fik et foredrag om ruinen. Sikkert spændende, men de var ved at være færdige, da vi kom frem, så vi kunne desværre ikke høre med.

    IMG_0020 IMG_0021

    Mens vi spiste hoppede en kvie over pigtråden og ind til ruinen, hvor græsset åbenbart var grønnere. Men så blev den forskrækket over os og hoppede ud igen – og trak resten af flokken i panik ned mod stranden. Her blev de så overraskede af vores kajakker, så de lige måtte undersøge. Især Pers gule kajak var spændende. Jeg gik ned for at tage et billede med min telefon, men så løb kvierne afsted igen og forsvandt mod syd.

    IMG_0022 IMG_0018

    Turen tilbage gik via Jyllinge og østsiden af fjorden. Jeg trænede lidt bagror, telemarksvendinger, sideforflytninger og min rostil. Ved Jyllinge Nordmark krydsede vi over til Skuldelev til isætningsstedet. De fleste gjorde klar til at pakke kajakkerne på bilerne, men vi var da tre, der ville lege lidt. Så jeg fik trænet rul – og lidt selvredning, når det ikke helt gik efter planen. Jeg kan oplyse, at vandet fortsat er til at bade i. Jeg er vist klar til EPP-prøve i morgen aften!

    Rute: Skuldelev til Eskilsø & retur
    Isætning:  55°47’32.88″ 12° 3’21.64″
    Optagning: —”—
    Distance roet:  15,21 km
    Vejr: 19 grader. Vind 2 m/s fra SØ. Mest overskyet, men lidt sol

    by KajakGal at August 30, 2015 04:18 pm

    Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
    A journal of my sea kayak trips.

    August 30th - Discovery Island (#76)

    Dan and I went for a spin round our favourite islands. There was a bit of wind and current against us on the way out, but it was with us for the way back! As we left the beach I went to check out the 3 sailboats whose anchors had dragged and were high and dry. The did not leave contact #s so I can't let them know their boat is aground...
    click to enlarge
    15 km, YTD 601 km

    Now that we are 2/3 of the way through the year, I notice that I am well on my way to do over 100 paddles in the year, but a bit behind on my 1000 km goal! I will need to do a few more longer paddles to get caught up!

    by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 03:09 pm

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Paddle California
    Thoughts from the world of kayaking centered in California. Ocean, whitewater, flatwater, wherever the paddling takes me. Trip reports, gear reviews, teaching and leadership, with pictures and video.

    Surf's up - if you can find it

    The Mendocino Coast is a pretty amazing place to kayak. It has everything you could want - big swells, mellow days, rock gardens, sea caves, tidal rivers, a little whitewater, and breathtaking scenery. It also has some surf. And there are some good surf days. But the truth is that most of the surf spots are a little junky most of the time. There aren't any place that consistently get good surf conditions. The mouth of Big River, just south of Mendocino, is a place that always has surf. Some days it even works well as a teaching spot. But it's never very good.

    That doesn't mean that it can't be fun. We had 3' @ 16 sec WNW swell which are nice waves but they didn't really hit any of the breaks right. Big River had some fun rides, but it also had reflections that came at you sideways. And it was on a flood, so getting out wore you out before you caught a ride. Whenever I go surfing I call it successful if I get one good ride. That's about all I got today, but I did catch it on film and I did leave with a smile. Enjoy:

    by Bryant Burkhardt (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 08:38 am

    Kayak Yak
    kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

    Seriously equipped

    What a day! after weeks of sunshine, it's raining in squalls. The wind blows in gusts... first nothing, then a breeze, and suddenly the trees are thrashing and then still. With the weather forecast saying "be careful out there" I did NOT go out paddling today. Instead I checked that my kayaking gear is packed just fine under the deck. Now the rain is pounding down in sheets.
    Wonder how a family I saw the other day is doing on their camping trip. Their RV was waiting at a traffic light as Bernie and I walked past and saw the family's big smiles and their arms resting on the open windows. On the roof of their RV was tied a big ol' red canoe, the type that I think nearly everyone has paddled for their first time in a boat. Behind the RV was their boat trailer with a powerboat much like a nice Bayliner. And a Zodiac inflatable was tied upside-down on top of the powerboat, with a smaller motor of its own.
    "When you're taking THREE boats on your trip," said Bernie, "you are SERIOUSLY equipped."

    by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at August 30, 2015 12:50 am

    vincent kayak

    drifting down river 2

    drifting down river with friends - a motley crew of plastics

    or
    -        best downloaded first and played back on large screen with good speakers

    by vincent (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2015 12:07 am

    August 29, 2015

    Sea Kayaking in the Channel Islands
    Sea kayaking in the Channel Islands and further afield.

    Paternosters Again

    It has been a while so I posted on the site, the aim of a photograph everyday, went out the window due to changing personal circumstances, but it is probably an opportune time to start to post again.
    Today's paddle was to the Paternosters, a reef off the north west coast of Jersey, which is rarely visited by by other boat owners, as landing would be almost impossible.
    On today's large spring tide there was a significant amount of exposed rock but Tuesday mornings tide is another 0.6 metre lower, with an 03:27 low water,  I think its true to say though nobody will be on the reef to witness it how much more is exposed.
    For us though, it was a great couple of hours on the water.
    Nicky arriving at the Paternosters.  Heading west from Bonne Nuit we made full use of the ebbing spring tide, most of the time we were averaging about 6 knots.
     Looking back towards the north west corner of Jersey.  Standing here is probably one of the most isolated locations in the Baliwick of Jersey
     A merry band of paddlers.  For a couple of the group it was their first visit to this reef off the north coast of Jersey.
     Looking north towards Sark, an excellent paddling destination in its own right.
     Leaving the reef towards the north coast of Jersey
    This isn't an image to show that industry occurs around the coast of but rather the scene of environmental success.  In the sheds of the quarry a pair of chough's bred, for the first time in Jersey for approximately 100 years.  Sadly we didn't see them today.

    by noreply@blogger.com (Kevin Mansell) at August 29, 2015 09:58 pm

    Mountain and Sea Scotland
    Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

    Evening variety show - come rain or shine


     Allan, Lorna and I had arranged to meet for an evening paddle on the Moray Firth, a short trip starting and finishing at the harbour in the village of Findochty (pronounced locally Finechty).  I arrived over an hour before we'd agreed to meet and decided to get on the water for a quick paddle west from the harbour.  A heavy shower of rain had recently passed through, leaving a bright rainbow arcing over the harbour and the prominent kirk overlooking the bay.






     In common with many fishing villages, many of the houses in the village are brightly painted.  The original paint used was oil based which better withstood the weather and also gave the bright colouring, a tradition which has happily continued.  Above the village to the west is the prominent war memorial.  I noticed that an ominously dark cloud was approaching from the southwest - it seemed that another rain shower was on the way.






     The leading edge of the shower was wrapping around out to sea - I was clearly going to get wet!






     When the rain did start it was in big fat drops and the wind got up quite significantly......






     ....before the heavens opened and it absolutely battered down!  The force of the rain was really impressive, and battened down inside my jacket I could enjoy the experience in relative comfort





     The intense rain lasted just minutes before the shower moved away out to sea and normality returned.





     Shortly the warm evening sunshine was back out and the wind dropped, leaving the air sharp and clear.  I paddled back into Findochty harbour......





    ...and, like the "Mannie", sat in the sunshine to wait for Lorna and Allan.  This sculpture of a seated fisherman was created by local artist Correna Cowie and has looked out over the harbour since 1959.

    by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at August 29, 2015 09:43 pm

    Essex Explorations
    Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.