Paddling Planet

May 26, 2015

May 25, 2015

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Birthday sail!

By pure coincidence, the first Sebago Sailing Committee Sail Cruise of 2015 happened to be on my birthday. The forecast was getting up to borderline intimidating for a first sail of the year by Sunday morning, but I had my heart set on it and TQ was game to come along. We had a blast. Photos end after lunch because by then there was a strong south wind and we just screeched back to the Paerdegat - needed both hands to keep it together. Tons of fun! Click here for more pix on Flickr.

by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 25, 2015 09:33 pm

The Ikkatsu Project
In the Service of the Ocean

What Peter Saw

IMG_0454

I just finished the Puget Trail route yesterday… a reminder for me, if nothing else, that we live in a particularly beautiful and amazing part of the world.

It was interesting to see it all through the lens of history, to try to picture this nIMG_0427 IMG_0427 ew land with Puget’s eyes. (“First blue eyes in Puget Sound,” I say sometimes, although I have no idea if his eyes were blue at all. No portraits or drawings of the man have survived; even his relatives don’t know exactly what he looked like. I find that a bit odd.)

But what a legacy! I was recently in Washington DC and had a chance to see a few of the monuments, large and small, and although some were grand and ornate, none were anywhere near the scale of this particular commemorative monument: an entire inland sea, the gateway to Alaska and the Orient, home to almost 6 million – and counting –  named after one man. That’s pretty impressive.

And it still has that magic, that sense of new land, that feeling that there are different futures waiting around each bend in the waterway, and there are still places that look like they did then, or close to it. I saw porpoises, foxes, seals and deer aplenty. I didn’t see any brown bear on Ketron Island (like Puget’s men reported), but overall I was impressed with the wildlife that crossed my path. Even the obnoxiously loud and pushy raccoons that partied outside my tent that last night on Anderson Island.

I expect I’ll be writing up several different versions of this trip, when it’s all said and done. I’m supposed to turn out a short piece for Canoe and Kayak magazine (should get busy on that right soon, actually), and I’d really like to put a longer piece together, one that incorporates the science and the history along witIMG_0414 IMG_0414 h the adventure. (If you see National Geographic, have them give me a call anytime.)

For now, there are these photos. Thanks to everyone that followed along on Twitter and Facebook… if you didn’t, you can check the timeline out here and here. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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by Ken Campbell at May 25, 2015 09:02 pm

OCEANPAX Paddle / Run / Be
Reflections on life, self-propelled outdoor pursuits, and all manner of things that may come to mind while sea kayaking on the waters, and minimalist running along the trails, of south Vancouver Island and Gabriola Island in beautiful British Columbia, Canada.

Perfect Auchmithie: Paddling back...inside the planet.




Back in bonnie Scotland now, we had a weather window of opportunity - rare, these past weeks, and it beckoned. It really beckoned. If the Saturday forecast conditions held, it would be perfect. It was.

The venue: the North Sea. Launch spot: the tiny, former fishing village of Auchmithie, perched on the red, sandstone cliffs, north of Arbroath. The gathering: seven smiling sea kayakers...hungry for some adventure. 

It became a "banquet" of treats, a perfect day on the water: sunshine, warm air temperature, sea birds, deep and dark caverns and caves, dramatic photographic opportunities, stunning geological features, excellent company...and a sea state that transitioned from benign to "energetic".

Coming from the Kingdom of Fife, Ayrshire, Glasgow, and Aberdeenshire, Ian, Douglas, Mike, Maurice, and Phil and Joan and myself met at the old harbour, beneath the cliffs at Auchmithie, for a 1030 hrs launch. It was great to see Ian, Mike, and Douglas again - we'd paddled here together a month and a half ago. And it was a real pleasure to meet Maurice and Phil, two more passionate sea kayakers. It was a good company, indeed.

The coast along here is well seasoned with sea caves and caverns. It is not often possible to paddle into them. This day, however, there was an opportunity on the southbound leg, on the northbound return leg, not so much. Douglas has posted an excellent narrative on the day here. I'm hoping Ian will do the same on Mountain and Sea Scotland. :)

Here's just a small taste...


Paddling "inside the planet" can be like being inside a massive, medieval cathedral, it is "awe"some. Hearts and minds still...in the silence.


A "light" at the end of this cave, leads to the Gaylet Pot, a massive blow hole, in the middle of a farmer's field.


There is a "secret beach", 150m inland...few vessels have ever landed there. How could they? Those that did, were probably pirates!


We paddled back out to sea, and south along the coast.


It was time to stretch legs...



and examine the marvellous geological formations, formed south of the equator...they astonish the imagination.


Oceanside dining doesn't get much better...no line ups, no reservations needed, fine food and beverage...


It was time for a formal group photo...the four men in mango (Mike, Douglas, myself, Ian), Maurice in red, and Phil in yellow. Photo taken by the "lady in red". ;) We were one pretty happy paddling family.


The narrow boats rested...they would work hard on the return trip.


Launching again, we passed the "Needle's E'e".



There was some excitement and drama to follow...but first, a stop for ice cream. 

Yes, ice cream. ;)

by Duncan and Joan (noreply@blogger.com) at May 25, 2015 02:10 pm

Gnarlydog News

GEAR: SeaDog Commander.

I fell in, again. I have been surfing for an hour and now I was heading home. I sailed for a while but then I turned directly into the wind and I wanted to stow my sail away. Stretching myself forward trying to reach the shock cord to secure the folded bundle of my sail made my loose my balance and I kept on falling in. I realized that I needed a sail that would fold easily on my kayak deck.

by gnarlydog (noreply@blogger.com) at May 25, 2015 01:50 pm

Sea kayaking with seakayakphoto.com
Imagine you are at the edge of the sea on a day when it is difficult to say where the land ends and the sea begins and where the sea ends and the sky begins. Sea kayaking lets you explore these and your own boundaries and broadens your horizons. Sea kayaking is the new mountaineering.

A rescue and two ice cream heads at Auchmithie.

On the May Bank Holiday Saturday, Maurice, Mike, Phil and I drove from Ayrshire and Glasgow to the old fishing village of Auchmithie on the Angus coast NE of Arbroath. We met Duncan and Joan who had driven over from Fife and Ian who had driven south from Aberdeenshire.  We had paddled here quite recently and enjoyed it so much we were back for more. Until the mid 19th century Auchmithie

by Douglas Wilcox (noreply@blogger.com) at May 25, 2015 11:55 am

Eko
in KAYAK DA MARE, bivaccando libera-mente

DELTA del PO

Trekking di 110 km. in 3 giorni e mezzo

esplorando in kayak da mare

IL  GRANDE  DELTA

                                                                                                          Delta del Fiume Po

Mare Adriatico Settentrionale

Eko-mappe © – Eko-foto © – Eko-commenti © – La premessa e il testo di Lorenzo Molinari  ©


Stefano ci guida nella Laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Poster – Stefano ci guida nella Laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Posso comprendere che Lorenzo, cresciuto canoisticamente su fiumi cristallini e ricchi di vitalità alpina, veda nel Grande Delta più la morte del fiume che la nascita di nuova vita.

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Poster – Stefano ci guida nella Laguna degli Allagamenti sud

Chi vive nel Delta e del Delta vive, come chi ha una formazione più marina che fluviale, osserva la morte del fiume con occhi diversi.
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Lo sguardo si proietta verso la grandiosità e la bellezza di queste terre così estreme. 
Terre di confine che traggono vita proprio dalla morte del fiume. 
Sabbie che, nonostante e malgrado “tutto”, nascono e crescono dal seme vitale  del Fiume Po.
Ekomappa - 100 km. e più nel Delta del Po - Percorso in kayak

Ekomappa – 110 km. in kayak, nel Delta del Po

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E’ una grande gioia pagaiare su queste acque che si mescolano e si sposano senza interruzione. 
Fiume, laguna e mare si scambiano vicendevolmente le acque, modellando l’immensità del Delta. 
Le giovani spiagge a mare, sono davvero molto belle!
sono un grande dono della natura!
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Il silenzioso bivacco su spazi immensi e selvaggi, con le onde marine davanti agli occhi, dopo aver solcato lagune che respirano al ritmo di più maree giornaliere, maree che spesso superano il metro di altezza. 
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Affrontare problematiche di non facile orientamento tra i canneti e la foschia.
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Navigare in un paesaggio non certo banale o scontato, anche se “discutibile”. 
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E’ questa un’esperienza che un buon kayaker non dovrebbe lasciarsi sfuggire.

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Michele e Lorenzo al Bonello Bacucco

POSTER – Michele e Lorenzo al Bonello Bacucco

Il fiume trasuda
olio e catrame
le chiatte scivolano
con la marea che si volge…

sospingono
tronchi che vanno alla deriva…

Thomas Stearns Eliot, da “The waste land”

   

          PREMESSA

  Non posso ingannarmi, convincendomi di aver attraversato luoghi che ricorderò per la loro bellezza. Al di là che possa non piacermi ciò che per altri è bello, credo di saper cogliere la bellezza ma nel morente per prima cosa si percepisce essenzialmente altro.

Quando il fiume cessa di essere, cessa di scorrere, quando la sua vitalità è ormai venuta meno, quando le sue acque hanno perso da tempo trasparenza e lucentezza, imputridite e inquinate da liquami e sostanze chimiche riversate senza posa da civiltà che prolificarono e prolificano per le centinaia di chilometri delle sue sponde e lungo quelle dei suoi affluenti, quando alle sue acque non resta che il saltuario ribollio di un lento fermentare, perché svuotate di ogni respiro, anche la vita che fino allora accoglieva si è persa a valle. Le acque opache e torbide si disperdono per fermarsi in lagune paludose e melmose, in attesa di essere risucchiate e sparire oltre la foce, dove il fiume dissolverà ogni traccia di quel suo lungo e maestoso scivolare dalle montagne innevate fino a questa desolata terra. Come ombra di se stesso, attende stanco un cambio di marea, che lo cancellerà definitivamente, per quanto speri ancora e sempre che lo rapisca il traboccare di una sua stessa piena, evitandogli la fine peggiore, il disperdersi in vapore nell’aria, come cenere di morti, quando il sole incessantemente picchia sullo sfavillante specchio, non consentendo neppure quell’ultimo attimo, sussulto, nell’incontro mortale con il tanto atteso mare.

reti stese a Scardovari

reti stese a Scardovari

Qui nel delta si deposita finalmente ciò che gelosamente ha macinato e trasportato in sospensione dalle vette alpine, creando scanni, delimitando immense sacche salmastre, in cui sovente anche la canoa s’insabbia, se non si seguono le briccole dei canali periodicamente dragati. Granelli di nulla che vanificano oggi sforzo umano nel mantenere l’esistente, spostando inevitabilmente i confini sempre più avanti, prolungando l’agonia verso un mare anch’esso arenato su se stesso, nel desolante monito della lanterna vecchia al Mezzanino, neppure troppo antica, ormai inglobata a un paio di chilometri dal mare e privata della sua originaria funzione di guida.

Il fiume ha trasportato fin qui una memoria lontana e antica, disciolta e impercettibile, da cui affiorano ricordi e sensazioni melanconiche di luoghi ormai passati e dimenticati; così come mutato è il corso stesso del fiume e del suo sbocco, nel trasportare sempre nuove acque, accogliendo il passaggio di barche e chiatte destinate anch’esse a passare, passare e passare, in quell’eternità che è propria del fiume e che per noi naviganti si concilia solo con l’esserci ora.

allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

Questo è il delta: acqua e terra di confine; spazio salmastro dove altre specie di pesci nuotano cieche, strisciano lungo il fondo, si mimetizzano nel fango o, smarrite e soffocate, saltano all’aria rivelando la loro presenza a becchi affamati e veloci, che non si fanno mancare la preda.

L’uomo ha cercato per millenni di fermarvi il tempo, di non farlo morire proprio qui sul delta, uno spazio a se stante, non solo e non tanto geograficamente, quanto temporalmente. Ma anche qui il destino ultimo del morente si sta consumando: la fabbrica naturale di canneti, per quanto florida, è stata abbandonata, sostituendo la canna delle capanne e dei ricoveri con materiali sintetici, preferendo i tessuti plastici come riparo per il sole e i termoplastici per produrre contenitori. I tronchi, trasportati abbondanti dalle piene pluviali e depositati sugli scanni, non saranno più né legna da ardere, né sostegni immersi di palafitte e tanto meno diventeranno assito nella barca del cozzaro con cui andare a coltivare il mitilo, lungo i fili sommersi che pendono da tralicci disseminati nelle sacche, o del vongolaro con cui raggiungere la sua area di secca, per rastrellare il fondo e raccogliere il bivalve prelibato.

Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

seguendo le briccole nella Sacca del Canarin

Chilometri e chilometri di argini, fino all’orizzonte, costruiti con pesanti blocchi provenienti da cave montane e quindi lontane e quindi a caro prezzo e quindi – viene facile pensare – con tutti gli annessi e connessi derivanti dagli appalti per la realizzazione di queste opere monumentali, il cui misero e fallimentare intento sta nel mantenere una precaria stabilità nella salinità delle acque, nel continuo scambio tra mare e fiume, per permettere l’antica industria del mollusco a quelle ormai poche persone che a fatica ci cavano un magro stipendio. Archeologia industriale, che non si capisce perché sia ancora tenuta in vita, quando l’investimento complessivo supera di gran lunga il guadagno, e non credo che avvenga per una politica specifica, quanto per incrociarsi di circostanze confluenti, e non perché questa industria valga, anche storicamente, più di quella del baco da seta o di tante altre ormai perdute, avendo il mondo il suo corso, il verso a cui prima o poi ci si deve non tanto arrendere ma inevitabilmente adeguare.

spettrale ciminiera dell'Enel - Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

la spettrale ciminiera dell’Enel – Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

E verrà dell’altro, del nuovo, che, se aggrappati all’antico non sapremo traguardare, certificherà l’ennesimo fallimento. Già ci aveva pensato l’Enel con la centrale termoelettrica di Porto Tolle, nel cuore del delta, ora in spettrale abbandono, dopo aver causato numerose morti per l’inquinamento con la sua torre funeraria in cemento armato di oltre 250 metri, visibile ovunque, che fino a tempi recenti era il manufatto più alto d’Europa, lo scempio per eccellenza in un’area tra le più selvagge. Oggi troppo costoso da demolire, da cancellare, e così non resterà che trovarne una degna riqualificazione ma in questi luoghi apparirà per sempre in penoso contrasto, una ferita aperta.

Sacca della Batteria - case allagate

Sacca della Batteria – case allagate

Come se non bastasse, lo sfruttamento del sottosuolo del delta avvenuto in passato, avviato per la presenza di gas fossili, ha progressivamente affondato intere aree un tempo agricole, con i loro fabbricati rurali, cascine e magazzini per la raccolta dei frutti della terra, costringendo all’abbandono e alla migrazione al di là degli argini, dove la terra è fertile per le bonifiche, o più spesso verso mete lontane in cerca di fortuna. Ma ciò che gli argini hanno artificialmente confinato, appare sradicato e forzosamente altro, non più appartenente alla cultura, al divenire del delta.

Il delta è zona depressa e, in quanto abbandonato, è delta e niente più. La connotazione umana, economica e sociale, che all’uomo piace tanto dare a ogni spazio: invadendolo, frazionandolo, accatastandolo e sfruttandolo, qui ha perso senso più che altrove, perché ciò che per noi è connotabile, per la natura semplicemente è, in attesa di riprendere il suo corso, di riappropriarsi prima o poi di ciò che le è stato sottratto, un battito d’ali per i tempi del mondo.

Ciò che è abbandonato può diventare facile terra di conquista d’imprenditori interessati più al ritorno economico dell’investimento che alla salvaguardia del delta, e l’impatto ambientale non dipende solo dal tipo di attività ma anche dalla dimensione che tale attività assume. Potrebbe proliferare il turismo in battello, il birdwatching, potrebbero realizzare porti per barche da diporto, villaggi turistici, stabilimenti balneari, parchi acquatici, parcheggi attrezzati per camperisti e chissà cos’altro. Tutto ciò potrà riportare luce al delta, rilanciandone l’economia, ma certamente io, Marco Ferrario e Michele Varin non avremo alcun dubbio a puntare altrove la prua della nostra canoa, per provare ancora quel leggero fruscio che accompagna lo scorrere della carena sull’acqua. Stefano Barbiero, canoista e conoscitore del delta, non solo perché vi è nato ma perché ama la sua terra, è da tempo interessato al recupero economico a livello turistico di alcune aree dismesse, tra cui la ex centrale elettrica dell’Enel (per chi fosse interessato alle sue proposte: stefano.barbiero@teletu.it).

Eko-mappe  Delta Po

Ekomappa 1 - dal Po di Tramontana agli Allagamenti con la Sacca Canarin

Eko-mappa – Delta Po 1 – Dal Po di Tramontana alla Busa degli Allagamenti

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Ekomappa 2 Delta Po - dagli Allagamenti al Bacucco con la Sacca Scardovari.

Eko-mappa – Delta Po 2 – Dagli Allagamenti al Bonello Bacucco, con la Sacca Scardovari.

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Ekomappa 3 - Delta Po -  Dal Bonello Bacucco alla Sacca di Goro

Eko-mappa – Delta Po 3 – Dal Bonello Bacucco alla Sacca di Goro

IL TREKKING

poco dopo l'imbarco - ore 7,30 - risalendo il Po di Tolle da Barricata

poco dopo l’imbarco – ore 7,30 – risalendo il Po di Tolle da Barricata

1° giorno. Siamo partiti dalla punta di Barricata lungo il Po delle Tolle e abbiamo risalito verso Nord per i labirinti del delta, d’altronde l’andare per il delta si apprezza proprio non prendendo la via maestra ma perdendosi per canaletti e canneti, esplorando l’esplorabile, pur sempre ricordandosi la via da cui si proviene in quel dedalo senza approdi, anche perché le mappe, per quanto si possa disporne di recenti, non sono mai fedeli a una realtà mutevole a ogni piena e alluvione.

nel Po di Tolle

nel Po di Tolle

Nel Po di Tolle

Nel Po di Tolle

canale dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

canale dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

canale dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

canale dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

paradelo dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

paradelo dal Po di Tolle alla laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Tenuta Daccò in laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Tenuta Daccò in laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Silos Daccò in laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

Silos Daccò in laguna degli Allagamenti Sud

laguna degli Allagamenti Sud - Daccò

laguna degli Allagamenti Sud – Daccò

Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

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Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

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Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Casa in tenuta Daccò - Laguna degli Allagamenti

Casa in tenuta Daccò – Laguna degli Allagamenti

Tenuta Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Tenuta Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Palazzo Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

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tenuta Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

tenuta Daccò in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Siamo passati per la Tenuta Daccò, abbiamo attraversato la Busa del Bastimento per entrare in Laguna di Canarin e, vagabondando per canaletti, spesso a fondo cieco, siamo giunti ai laghetti del Girotto, sempre in vista dell’orribile mostro dell’ex centrale dell’Enel.

Mazzolin di fiori in mezzo alla Busa di Bastimento

Mazzolin di fiori in mezzo alla Busa di Bastimento

Mazzolin di fiori in mezzo alla Busa di Bastimento

Mazzolin di fiori in mezzo alla Busa di Bastimento

 la Busa di Bastimento

in Busa di Bastimento

nella Sacca del Canarin, sotto il cielo del Delta

nella Sacca del Canarin, sotto il cielo del Delta

navigando nel Canarin

navigando nel Canarin

nella laguna del Canarin

nella laguna del Canarin

Sacca del Canarin - ansa di Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin – ansa di Polesine Camerini

Casa-barca alla Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

Casa-barca alla Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

Casa-barca alla Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

Casa-barca alla Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin - Polesine Camerini

Sacca del Canarin – Polesine Camerini

A causa del vento e del freddo, abbiamo pagaiato senza sosta per scaldarci. Ci siamo fermati per una veloce merenda su una spiaggetta di conchiglie presso un vecchio barcone, come quelli del ponte di Bereguardo sul Ticino, e su cui una gentile coppia aveva costruito negli anni una casetta.

approdo al faro di Maistra

approdo al faro di Punta Maistra

 il faro di Punta Maistra - brutto come una ciminiera

il faro di Punta Maistra – brutto come una ciminiera

il faro di Punta Maistra

il faro di Punta Maistra

approdo al faro di Maistra

approdo al faro di Maistra

Una seconda sosta l’abbiamo fatta lungo la Busa Dritta, al faro di Punta Maistra, brutto come una ciminiera, abbandonato da suo custode e famiglia, dopo l’avvento dell’elettronica.

lo sbarco al faro di Busa Dritta è rischioso

Busa Dritta – lo sbarco al faro di Punta Maistra è rischioso

Sacca della Batteria

Sacca della Batteria

Sacca della Batteria

Sacca della Batteria

Poi per Batteria alle case allagate, spettrali cascine e costruzioni sprofondate e, di conseguenza, sommerse.

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Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria – Case Allagate

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Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria – Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria

il camino della Sacca della Batteria

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Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria – Case Allagate

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Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria – Case Allagate

53a - Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

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Sacca della Batteria - Case Allagate

Sacca della Batteria – Case Allagate

Laguna del Burcio

Laguna del Burcio

Anche qui a girovagare in cerca di un’uscita, dato che la bassa marea impediva le rotte più logiche, fino a vedere in lontananza un barcone che transitava oltre un canneto, indicandoci dove andare e, trovato un canale con un buon fondale, fino a uno sbocco sul mare tra lo Scanno del Gallo e quello del Burcio.

Scanno del Burcio

Scanno del Burcio

All’arrivo sulla lunga lingua di spiaggia deserta e desolata dello Scanno del Gallo (o del Burcio), appena prima della Busa di Tramontana, un forte vento incontrastato da terra ci ha fatto lottare per piantare le tende, intanto che Stefano Barbiero ci salutava, prendendo il mare come via di ritorno, dopo averci guidato per tutto il primo giorno.

Spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

Spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

 cena sulla spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

cena sulla spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

Sotto un cielo plumbeo, che fortunatamente ci ha risparmiati fino al calare della notte, il vento si è preso la rivincita impastandoci la bocca di minuti granelli sabbia. Ci siamo preparati una di quelle semplici cene, che sa apprezzare solo chi ha trascorso tutta la giornata a pagaiare o a camminare, mentre una volpe attraversava la spiaggia e si nascondeva nella vegetazione oltre la duna, e chissà com’era giunta su quell’isolotto!

In questo periodo dell’anno le zanzare non sono ancora proliferate e anche per questo non abbiamo faticato ad addormentarci, dopo circa trentacinque chilometri percorsi in lungo e in largo su fondali spesso tanto bassi da arenarci e avendo dovuto contrastare correnti, maree e il vento teso con canoe pesanti di tutto il necessario per quattro giorni.

Spiaggia allo scanno del Burcio

Spiaggia allo Scanno del Burcio

bivacco all'alba, con pioggia, sulla spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

bivacco all’alba, con pioggia, sulla spiaggia dello Scanno del Burcio

Spiaggia allo scanno del Burcio

Spiaggia allo scanno del Burcio

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Spiaggia allo scanno del Burcio

Spiaggia allo scanno del Burcio

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Bivacco in Spiaggia allo Scanno del Burcio

Bivacco in Spiaggia allo Scanno del Burcio

Bivacco in Spiaggia allo Scanno del Burcio

Bivacco in Spiaggia allo Scanno del Burcio – per pochi secondi, è arrivato un raggio di sole.

A pochi metri da noi, una pinna di delfino sorge dal mare al largo di Scanno Boa.

A pochi metri da noi, una pinna di delfino sorge dal mare al largo di Scanno Boa.

2° giorno. La mattina il mare era poco mosso, così abbiamo preferito tornare verso Sud pagaiando sotto costa e, come ci siamo allontanati dal litorale per evitare i frangenti, a non più di un centinaio di metri da riva, siamo stati accolti da un branco di delfini adulti, che pascolava forse in cerca di prede tra le reti lasciate in mare dai pescatori.

Spiaggia e porticciolo all'ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Spiaggia e porticciolo all’ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

porticciolo all'ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

porticciolo all’ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Porticciolo di pesca all'ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Porticciolo di pesca all’ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

lavori al porticciolo di pesca all'ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

lavori al porticciolo di pesca all’ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Spiaggia all'ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Spiaggia all’ingresso della sacca di Scardovari (vicino a Barricata)

Superata la Bocca del Po delle Tolle, lasciato il mare, ci siamo fermati a mangiare sulla spiaggetta riparata appena oltre Barricata, di fianco agli approdi del porticciolo dei pescatori.

Sacca di Scardovari - pagaiata tra gli allevamenti di cozze.

Sacca di Scardovari – pagaiata tra gli allevamenti di cozze.

Sacca di Scardovari - allevamenti di cozze.

Sacca di Scardovari – allevamenti di cozze.

barche e cavane di Scardovari

barche e cavane di Scardovari

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barche e cavane di Scardovari

reti, cavana e barca a Scardovari

reti, cavana e barca a Scardovari

barca di Scardovari

barca di Scardovari

barca da pesca della sacca di Scardovari

barca da pesca della sacca di Scardovari

barca e cavana di Scardovari

barca e cavana alla Sacca di Scardovari

barche e cavane di Scardovari

barche e cavane alla Sacca di Scardovari

cavane di Scardovari

barche e cavane alla Sacca di Scardovari

barca e cavana di Scardovari

barca e cavana alla Sacca di Scardovari

cavana a Scardovari

cavana a Scardovari

reti, cavana e barca a Scardovari

reti, cavana e barca a Scardovari

sotto la cavana - Scardovari

sotto la cavana – Scardovari

sotto la cavana - Scardovari

sotto la cavana – Scardovari

cavana a Scardovari

Barca e cavana alla Sacca di Scardovari

barca e cavane di Scardovari

barche e cavane di Scardovari

Pagaiando lungo la riva della Sacca di Scardovari, abbiamo superato le cavane a palafitta allineate dei cozzari e attraversato la Sacca tra i filari degli allevamenti di cozze,

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traversata della Sacca di Scardovari tra gli allevamenti di cozze.

traversata est-ovest della Sacca di Scardovari tra gli allevamenti di cozze.

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pagaiando tra gli allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

pagaiando tra gli allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

pagaiando tra gli allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

pagaiando tra gli allevamenti di cozze della Sacca di Scardovari

reti alla Sacca di Scardovari

reti alla Sacca di Scardovari

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allevamenti di cozze alla sacca di Scardovari

Sacca di Scardovari - La pesa delle cozze

Sacca di Scardovari – La pesa delle cozze

Sacca di Scardovari

Sacca di Scardovari

Sacca di Scardovari - La pesa delle cozze

Sacca di Scardovari – La pesa delle cozze

 dirigendoci poi verso la Sacca di Bottonera.

Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di  Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

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Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di  Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

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Uova sul uovo scanno tra la Sacca di  Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

Uova sul uovo scanno tra la Sacca di Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

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Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di  Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

Nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di Scardovari e la Sacca della Bottonera

Canale dalla Bottonera al Po di Gnocca

Canale dalla Sacca Bottonera al Po di Gnocca

Canale dalla Bottonera al Po di Gnocca - e la sacca della Bottonera in bassa marea

Canale dalla Bottonera al Po di Gnocca – e la sacca della Bottonera in bassa marea

71b - Canale dalla Bottonera al Po di Gnocca

Canale dalla Bottonera al Po di Gnocca

Superato il Po di Gnocca, abbiamo girovagato tra i meandri delle acque interne e tra i canneti per ammirare la natura.

sbarco alla spiaggia interna del Bonello Bacucco

sbarco alla spiaggia interna del Bonello Bacucco

chiari del Bonello Bacucco

chiari del Bonello Bacucco

sbarco alla spiaggia interna del Bonello Bacucco

sbarco alla spiaggia interna del Bonello Bacucco

Paradeli del Bonello Bacucco

Paradeli del Bonello Bacucco

Preparativi di cena alla spiaggia del Bonello Bacucco

Preparativi di cena alla spiaggia del Bonello Bacucco

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Il cameriere del Bacucco  ;-)

 Il cuoco del Bacucco

Il cuoco del Bacucco  ;-)

 

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Preparativi per la serata al Bacucco

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l’oste del Bacucco  :-))

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luna piena sul nostro bivacco

Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

Tramonto con kayak, tenda e cappello – Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

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Dopo aver percorso una quarantina di chilometri, il secondo giorno si è concluso sulla magnifica spiaggia del Bacucco, invasa da tronchi e coperta di innumerevoli conchiglie.

Nel mese di maggio è facile trovare lungo le spiagge uova di uccelli, anche prive di un vero è proprio nido e che apparentemente sembrano abbandonate a se stesse, e non a causa della presenza di noi canoisti.

Abbiamo cenato seduti al tavolo di una costruzione estiva, realizzata con tronchi spiaggiati da villeggianti che approdano in giornata con barche a motore, brindando con una dovuta bottiglia di vino rosso. Il vento, che ancora non ci dava tregua, ma ora proveniva dal mare, aveva finalmente spazzato via le nuvole, offrendoci un cielo a sera illuminato dal plenilunio, mentre sul resto del Nord Italia e sul Tirreno pioveva a dirotto.

Tramonto sul chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

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Tramonto sul chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

Tramonto sul chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

colazione attendendo l'alba al Bonello Bacucco

colazione attendendo l’alba al Bonello Bacucco

colazione al Bonello Bacucco

colazione al Bonello Bacucco

colazione al Bonello Bacucco

colazione al Bonello Bacucco

Bivacco con uova, al Bonello Bacucco

una sorpresa, uova al Bonello Bacucco

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

nel Bonello Bacucco

nel Bonello Bacucco

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

canale dal Bacucco al Po di Goro

 

 Il faro di Goro

Il faro di Goro

3° giorno. Ripreso il largo tra i canneti, siamo arrivati, attraversando il Po di Goro, al Faro omonimo, tuttora abitato e meta turistica nella stagione estiva, per la presenza di un bar-trattoria e della famosa spiaggia dell’amore.

 Il faro di Goro

Il faro di Goro

Il faro di Goro

Il faro di Goro

La chiusa (trovata aperta) del Canale che va dal Po di Goro alla Sacca di Goro (a nord del faro)

La chiusa (trovata aperta) del Canale che va dal Po di Goro alla Sacca di Goro (a nord del faro)

Approfittando della chiusa ancora aperta, regolata in base dal flusso delle maree, per evitare che si alteri la salinità delle acque interne, siamo entrati nel Mezzanino.

Aironi nell'Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Aironi nell’Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nell'Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nell’Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nell'Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nell’Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro, Barca per vongole.

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro, Barca per vongole.

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro, la pesa delle vongole

Nel mezzo della Sacca di Goro, la pesa delle vongole

all'Ultima Spiaggia - l'estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

all’Ultima Spiaggia – l’estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

Passando per la lanterna vecchia e navigando tutta la lunghezza della valle di Gorino, fino alla Sacca di Goro, abbiamo raggiunto lo Scanno di Piallazza, lingua di sabbia sul finire a pelo d’acqua, anch’essa coperta di tronchi e conchiglie e, ovviamente, anche degli immancabili contenitori e bottiglie di plastica, per quanto mi sembra che il loro numero sia in progressivo calo.

all'Ultima Spiaggia - l'estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

Atollo Mediterraneo – l’estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

all'Ultima Spiaggia - l'estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

all’Ultima Spiaggia – l’estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

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all'Ultima Spiaggia - l'estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

all’Ultima Spiaggia – l’estrema punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

al largo dello Scanno di Goro (o spiaggia dell'amore)

al largo dello Scanno di Goro (o spiaggia dell’amore)

Una breve pausa per riposarci e mangiare qualcosa, per poi prendere il largo sul mare e navigare verso Nord-Est con il vento in parte alle spalle, ma non più violento come il primo giorno.

la foce del Po di Goro e il Faro

la foce del Po di Goro e il Faro

Tornati al Faro di Goro e surfando per accedere al Po di Goro, ci siamo inoltrati per i canali tra i canneti per raggiungere nuovamente la spiaggia dove avevamo trascorso la notte precedente.

 Avendo pagaiato solo venticinque chilometri, abbiamo piantato le tende già nel primo pomeriggio e ci siamo goduti del fascino di quell’insolita spiaggia.

Bonello Bacucco

Bonello Bacucco

Camminando lungo la riva io raccoglievo conchiglie, tra cui un raro e magnifico esemplare di una dozzina di centimetri di Stamonita, un Gasteropode del genere Murex, mentre Marco cercava ceppi di forme particolari, che caricati sulla coperta delle canoe, ha portato a casa come cimeli.

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3d - Paradelio del Bonello Bacucco

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Paradelio del Bonello Bacucco

Paradelio del Bonello Bacucco

Paradelio del Bonello Bacucco

Paradelio del Bonello Bacucco

4° giorno. Smontato il campo con calma, abbiamo pagaiato per canneti e canali fino a tagliare la Sacca di Bottonera e, seguendo lo Scanno di Scardovari, siamo arrivati dopo poco meno di una ventina di chilometri al porticciolo dei pescatori di Barricata, a breve distanza dalla macchina.

l'ex magazzino del riso nella Sacca della Bottonera  con marea crescente.

l’ex magazzino del riso nella Sacca della Bottonera con marea crescente.

 l'ex magazzino del riso nella Sacca della Bottonera

l’ex magazzino del riso nella Sacca della Bottonera

Nella Sacca di Scardovari

Nella Sacca di Scardovari

nel chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

nel chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

Nella Sacca di Scardovari

Nella Sacca di Scardovari

un chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

un chiaro del Bonello Bacucco

Vongola nella Nella Sacca di Scardovari

Vongola nella Nella Sacca di Scardovari

 Nella Sacca di Scardovari

Nella Sacca di Scardovari

Nel Po di Gnocca

Nel Po di Gnocca

Reti da pesca nella Sacca di Scardovari

Reti da pesca nella Sacca di Scardovari

Reti da pesca nella Sacca di Scardovari

Reti da pesca nella Sacca di Scardovari

La sacca di Scardovari

Lo sbarco finale alla spiaggietta della Sacca Scardovari (zona Barricata)

Fine Trekking – Sbarco alla spiaggietta della Sacca Scardovari (zona Barricata) – carichi di legna.

Prima di rientrare a casa, non è mancato un brindisi di prosecco con un discreto piatto di spaghetti alle vongole da Renata, una delle trattorie della zona, dove purtroppo non si respira più quell’atmosfera genuina come appare nelle foto sulle pareti, e non solo per l’arredamento, anche per il menù e le ricette, un po’ leziose, come forse predilige il palato del turista.

Testo: Lorenzo Molinari ©

Foto: Marco (Eko) Ferrario ©



 1/4 Maggio 2015 –

Lorenzo Molinari, Michele Varin e Marco (Eko) Ferrario

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Poster - con Stefano, la Guida del Delta - in Laguna degli Allagamenti

Poster – Stefano, la Guida del Delta, ci indica il percorso in Laguna degli Allagamenti.

Ringrazio l’amico Stefano Barbiero, kayaker del Delta (di Porto Tolle), che con passione ha vissuto insieme a noi il primo giorno di questo trekking.

Stefano è una eccellente guida e un profondo conoscitore del Delta Veneto, il suo contributo è stato per noi un arricchimento necessario e utile per comprendere meglio il Delta e questa avventura.

Stefano, ci ha chiesto, quale sentimento e desiderio ci conduce a pagaiare su queste acque e cosa più ci ha colpito ed entusiasmato del nostro trekking?
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Caro Stefano,
 Il faro di Goro

Il Faro di Goro

a distanza di anni, è la terza volta che in  Kayak da Mare, torno per qualche giorno a pagaiare e vagabondare nel Delta del Po.

Tra le cose che più ci sono piaciute, mi soffermo subito a descriverti la nostra tappa alla Sacca di Goro (la parte romagnola del Delta), che assolutamente devi conoscere ed apprezzare quanto la parte veneta.
La Sacca di Goro piace molto per gli spazi immensi e i profondi silenzi.
La foschia ovatta il paesaggio, donando un intenso mistero alla nostra esplorazione.
Abbiamo percorso in giornata un giro ad anello, imbarcandoci e rientrando dal/al Bonello Bacucco (vedi Eko-mappa 3).
Prima di entrare in Sacca siamo sbarcati al bel Faro di Goro, uno dei pochissimi luoghi durante  i quattro giorni di navigazione nel delta, in cui abbiamo notato una certa presenza umana.
Poche decine di metri a nord del Faro, c’è un ampio canale e noi siamo fortunati! La chiusa in corrispondenza del ponte è aperta così possiamo entrare, navigando in kayak, nella Sacca di Goro.
Alla nostra destra i canneti delimitano l’Oasi di Mezzanino ed è stato bello entrare e perdersi specchiandoci in questi chiari. L’acqua qui è più limpida, ci sono aironi, qualche cormorano e altri uccelli.
Nell'Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Nell’Oasi di Mezzanino (Sacca di Goro)

Più a nord, lungo la riva, c’è un relitto di una barca da pesca che il tempo sta lentamente consumando.

In lontananza scorgiamo la Vecchia Lanterna, il faro di quando la foce del Po arrivava fino a qui; più a sud, le acque appena percorse, sono tutte acque nuove, nate negli ultimi secoli, sono le giovani figlie dal Po.
Dopo questo vagabondare, è stato bello attraversare l’immensità della Sacca di Goro, percorrendo i canali ben tracciati dal susseguire delle briccole. E’ questa una importante zona di coltivazione e raccolta di vongole e, qua e la, sono collocate curiose reti di pesca disposte per intrappolare i pesci, mi hanno ricordato le reti per imprigionare i tonni, ma ovviamente tutto molto più in piccolo.
Ormai è mattina inoltrata e le vongolare avevano già abbandonato il lavoro, sarebbe stato bello vederle all’opera, sarà per la prossima volta.
In mezzo alla sacca, raggiungiamo la palafitta della pesa delle vongole e poi proseguiamo la nostra navigazione verso l’uscita a mare, che si ritrova di fronte a Volano, a circa 3 chilometri, ma la foschia allunga le distanze a dismisura.
all'Ultima Spiaggia - La punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

all’Ultima Spiaggia – La punta occidentale dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza)

Alla punta dello scanno di Goro (o di Piallazza), su quella che mi piace definire l’Ultima Spiaggia, ci fermiamo a pranzare.

La marea e le onde scoprono e coprono più volte al giorno questo lembo di spiaggia e aggiungono sabbia a sabbia depositando anche una enorme quantità di magnifiche conchiglie. Ci troviamo in un luogo estremo, il limite di un magnifico atollo mediterraneo, la fantasia mi porta a immaginare la bellezza di questo luogo (esotico) illuminato da un sole splendente.
Nel pomeriggio siamo poi tornati pagaiando a mare e dopo il faro di Goro, surfando l’onda tra le correnti della foce ci siamo infilati nel Po di Goro per prendere poi l’ampio canale che conduce verso il Bonello Bacucco.
Attraversato poi il ramo Morto (che da qualche anno non è più morto) siamo entrati nuovamente nel Bonello e percorsi alcuni suoi paradeli abbiamo raggiunto la spiaggia del nostro bivacco, la stessa della notte precedente.
In totale, nella giornata, avremo percorso 25 km. ma volendo avremmo potuto allungare il percorso di esplorazione della Sacca di Goro.
È presto, così abbiamo tutto il tempo per godere pienamente di questa vastissima spiaggia lunga un paio di chilometri che va dalla foce del Po Morto alla foce del Po di Gnocca.
Sulla spiaggia scorgiamo numerosi nidi con le uova, così cerchiamo di sistemare il nostro campo stando il più lontano possibile.

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cavane di Scardovari

cavane di Scardovari

E’ piaciuto molto l’aspetto esplorativo e avventuroso del trekking in kayak.

Non si tratta semplicemente di andare in canoa. Per navigare ed esplorare queste acque, se non si vive nel Delta, è indispensabile studiare la variazione delle maree e delle correnti, ragionare sui percorsi, per non perdersi e per non finire in secca, la qual cosa è veramente poco piacevole, prestando anche attenzione al mare, che anche quando è poco mosso, ha onde che frangono per centinaia di metri lungo le spiagge e le correnti alle varie bocche del Po possono essere molto impegnative da superare.
Entusiasmano le spiagge degli scanni; immense, silenziose, ricche di legna e di conchiglie portate dal mare e frequentate dagli uccelli marini.
cavane di Scardovari

cavane di Scardovari

Su di esse ci sono pochi rifiuti di plastica, le ricordavo più sporche in anni passati, forse i bagnanti, come anche i canoisti, hanno imparato a portare via i  loro rifiuti.

Piacciono gli spazi immensi della Sacca di Scardovari, le numerose cavane a palafitta lungo la riva di Scardovari e i caratteristici tralicci degli allevamenti delle cozze; questi ultimi ci hanno accompagnato durante la traversata della sacca, le corde penzolanti sull’acqua hanno creato una scenografia unica ed è stato bello giocare fotograficamente con le luci e i riflessi sull’acqua.
Sacca di Scardovari - allevamenti di cozze.

Sacca di Scardovari – allevamenti di cozze.

Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

Ci ha entusiasmato l’incontro con un gruppo di delfini che gironzolavano nei pressi delle reti a mare, al largo dello Scanno  Boa e guizzando  fuori dall’acqua, erano ben più veloci di un semplice clik delle nostre macchine fotografiche.

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Sulle spiagge ci sono piaciuti i comodi rifugi fatti con i tronchi d’albero e la legna depositata dal mare. Meno bello vedere spesso questi capanni vestiti da teli agricoli verdi o neri. Con tutte le canne nei paraggi, si poteva fare molto di meglio, senza spargere immondizia e deturpare il paesaggio.
Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

Bivacco al Bonello Bacucco

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Ci è piaciuta la luna quasi piena che ha illuminato la nostra notte del 2 maggio alla spiaggia del Bacucco.
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Ci sono immensamente piaciuti i nostri tre bivacchi, senza i quali il trekking avrebbe perso il suo fascino e le sue motivazioni.
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 l'ex magazzino del riso della Sacca della Bottonera

l’ex magazzino del riso della Sacca della Bottonera

Ci è piaciuto e incuriosito, gironzolare nelle lagune, in particolare tra le case e di magazzini allagati e ormai diroccati e divenuti archeologia del Delta.

 quel mazzolin di fiori in mezzo al ramo nord del Po di Bastimento

quel mazzolin di fiori in mezzo al del Po di Bastimento

Ci è piaciuto quel mazzolin di fiori gialli cresciuto tra i rami di un albero arenato nel mezzo della corrente del Po di Bastimento.

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Ci è piaciuta la sosta sul nuovo scanno tra la Sacca di Scardovari e la Sacca Bottonera, eletto dagli uccelli marini come luogo di nidificazione.
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Ci è piaciuto pagaiare facendo parte di un piccolo gruppo di amici che condividono le stesse emozioni per la natura, la tranquillità, i silenzi, l’avventura e il viaggiare slow con pagaia.
Anche se qui gli spazi sono vasti e ci sarebbe spazio per tanti, questi luoghi, per comprenderli, vanno vissuti con molta discrezione, in solitudine o tuttalpiù assieme a un ristrettissimo gruppetto di tranquilli kayaker.
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Ci è piaciuto quel piatto di spaghetti con le vongole veraci del Delta, che abbiamo gustato in una trattoria tra Barricata e Scardovari, prima di affrontare il viaggio di ritorno in auto per tornare a casa.
Stefano e il suo riflesso nel canale dal Po di Tolle agli Allagamenti Sud

Stefano e il suo riflesso nel Delta

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Non c’é piaceiuta 
l’invadente e irrispettosa presenza della ciminiera Enel di Polesine Camerini.
Deturpa il Delta sovrastandolo con sfacciata prepotenza.
Ovunque ci si trova, la ciminiera è onnipresente.
Una presenza asfissiante per questo paesaggio così morbido, basso e piatto.
Quella ciminiera è uno sfregio al Delta.
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Non ci sono piaciuti i molti chilometri di sassi e scogli che circondano la Sacca di Scardovari, molti Scanni e che arginano i rami del Po. Immaginiamo quale suprema bellezza in un Delta più selvaggio, in cui la natura avrebbe potuto essere davvero libera di svolgere interamente il suo corso, a scapito forse della vita dei propri abitanti, hai loro!
Ma forse è giusto così.
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Non c’è piaciuta l’acqua opaca, fangosa e marrone. Nelle passate esplorazioni autunnali la ricordavo più limpida, ma dipende anche dalle piogge che in primavera annaffiano abbondantemente la pianura Padana portando fango al Delta e poi, il grigiore di questo cielo rende l’acqua ancora più tetra.
.
al faro di Punta Maistra

al faro di Punta Maistra

Non c’è piaciuta la desolazione del faro di Punta Maistra, sulla Busa Dritta.

Un brutto faro, abbandonato e in rovina, triste e angosciante.

Se l’uomo del Delta volesse, penso che questo Faro possa ancora essere recuperato, per rinascere e trasformarsi in un punto di riferimento per tutto il Delta, come per il Faro di Goro e forse ancor più, trovandosi sulla foce principale del Po. Queste mura potrebbero trasformarsi in un rifugio, simile a quelli delle nostre montagne, con magari anche un piccolo museo del Delta e un punto di ristoro con servizi per i canoisti e non solo. La prima cosa da fare è la realizzazione di uno sbarco sicuro e decente, oggi è un vero rischio sbarcare dal kayak e poggiare piede su una banchina pericolante, con legni rotti e altri prossimi alla rottura.
Questo luogo potrebbe essere attrezzato per diventare un punto di arrivo o di sosta anche per escursioni in kayak. Un luogo adatto ad essere raggiunto dagli amanti della pagaia e del remo, che potrebbero imbarcarsi dall’ansa di Polesine Camerini (Canarin), luogo dove, anziché realizzare un grande porto turistico, che (se funzionasse) limiterebbe ulteriormente la pace e snaturerebbe ulteriormente il Delta, si potrebbe invece realizzare un centro remiero sfruttando le acque del Canarin, un punto di riferimento per quanti amano visitare il Delta con rispetto, sfruttando la propulsione umana.

______________________________
Per una navigazione più sicura, oltre ai soliti siti di meteo-mare abbiamo consultato l’utilissimo calendario delle maree cliccando su questo link: http://www.portobarricata.it/maree.html

______________________
Per programmare escursioni in kayak sul Delta Veneto, consiglio la consultazione
di “Il Delta In Canoa” 
dettagliata guida redatta nel 2001 da Fabio Roccato.
Anche se il Delta muta ad ogni piena, rimane questo il miglior documento: utile, ben fatto e necessario per chi vuole conoscere e affrontare serenamente il Delta a remi e mi piace
impronte di uccelli marini sulla sabbia del Bonello Bacucco

Impronte di uccelli marini sulla spiaggia del Delta – fotografia di Michele Varin

concludere con le sue parole d’amore per il Delta in Canoa.

.
.

Amo il Delta
perché placa il mio desiderio di solitudine.
Amo il Delta
perché mi riserva angoli dove dimenticarmi dei mali dell’umanità.

Amo la canoa
perché mi fa sentire parte integrante del Delta:
canna tra le canne,
acqua tra le acque,
uccello tra gli uccelli.



by eko at May 25, 2015 01:33 am

May 24, 2015

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 23rd - Breton Islands (#47)

I went up to Quadra Island to participate in the annual Pautik campout, an informal gathering of Greenland paddlers. WE camped on Rebecca Spit and had a leisurely morning of rolling practice and instruction. I spent some time working on my forward-forward norsaq roll which has been eluding me for some time. After spending some time with Alan coaching me, I made some good progress to the point that I got several double norsaq forward finishing rolls. I need to keep working on this as it now seems close! I estimate that I paddled 1 km in total, but decided not to count it!
In the afternoon I went for a paddle over to the Breton Islands with Andrew and Alan. The main  (south) Breton island  has a very nice campsite. I also saw several the Ochre sea stars (Pisaster sp) which have virtually disappeared around Victoria
It was good to see Andrew who had come all the way from Olympia to join us. It was also nice to meet up with several others of the "pautik clan".
click to enlarge
10 km, YTD 394 km.

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 24, 2015 09:46 pm

KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak » KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak

Vask af tørdragt i Goretex

VaskNu har jeg hørt mange, der er i tvivl om vask af tørdragt. Da jeg både ror kajak og kører motorcykel (dog ikke samtidigt), så er her min anvisning, der har baggrund i  mange års erfaring med Kokatat (tørdragt), Rukka (motorcykeltøj) og overtøj og sko fra Gore (fremtstiller af goretex).

Du skal følge den vaskeanvisning, du fik med sammen med tøjet. Har du forlagt den, så er det vigtigt at vide, at goretex-membranen egentligt ikke behøver specielle vaskemidler eller blive imprægneret. Når nogle forhandlere anbefaler at imprægnere goretex-tøj, så hjælper det ikke på åndbarheden eller membranen som sådan, men det gør tøjet mere smudsafvisende og derfor nemmere at holde efterfølgende.

Så spar pengene på særlige rengøringsmidler og følg denne nemme anvisning:

  1. Vask tørdragten med mild, flydende sæbe ved 40 grader. Brug ikke skyllemiddel, da det kan stoppe porerne i goretex-membranen (er du kommet til det alligevel, så vask tørdragten igen. Uden skyllemiddel!).
  2. Nu skal goretex-membranen genaktiveres. Og det skal gøres med varme! Så ind i tørretumbleren ved medium varme i 20 minutter. Tag herefter tørdragten ud, hæng den på en bøjle og lad den tørre op i vinden. Har du ikke en tørretumbler, så kan du også stryge dragten med et strygejern på lav temperatur.
  3. Smør lynlåse med et voksmateriale. Du kan få særlige olier og tørstifter, men et stearinlys kørt op og ned af lynlåsen er ok. Det kan dog give lidt fedtede pletter, som ikke har en betydning og forsvinder ved næste vask.
  4. Smør gummi-manchetter ind i et passende middel hertil. Der findes mange og nogle benytter flydende gummibeskyttelse fra bil-rengøringen, andre talkum. Vigtigt er det, at gummiet ikke tørre ud, for så sprækker det. Jeg bruger selv et bilplejemiddel.

Det er det!

 

Kilder:

Kokatat
Rukka
Goretex

 

by KajakGal at May 24, 2015 04:37 pm

KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak » KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak

Lange kryds til Lommestenen

IMGP246124. maj 2015

Kristian havde inviteret til søndagstur og foreslog at træne længere kryds. Vi skal jo til Bornholm om to uger, og hvis vejret arter sig, så er der jo kun 18 kilometer til Christiansø…. Det ville jo være lækkert at have roet dertil og oven i købet roet rundt om øerne. Men det er langt – og ikke mindst kedeligt at ro et så langt åbent kryds, så nu får vi at se.

Men trænes dertil, det skulle der. Og Kristian havde planlagt en rute, der gav et kryds på lidt over otte kilometer først og 12-13 kilometer tilbage. Det første kryds i modvind, der dog ikke var så kraftig. Men det blev alligevel lidt spændende!

Vi satte kajakkerne i vandet ved Jungedal lige øst for Kyndbyværket. Her er en fin sandstrand, men man skal være lidt lokalkendt for at finde den. Jeg har roet derfra flere gange, så jeg var hurtigt fremme. Vi roede forbi værket og en lille smule mod syd for at krydse over Isefjorden med kurs direkte mod Frømandskorpsets kaserne ved Kongsøre.

IMGP2454

Krydset tog os en kilometers penge nord for Orø og på den måde kunne vi undgå stenene og stenrevet nord for Orø. Halvvejs over begyndte det spændende: Vi havde haft modvind og derfor bølgerne imod os. De var ikke så store, men på grund af Lammefjorden og den berygtede vindtunnel, der kan skabes her, fik vi bølger ind fra tre sider: Fra venstre kom bølgerne fra Lammefjorden. I front kom bølgerne dannet af modvinden og fra højre kom en art refleksbølger, der blev dannet, når Lammefjordsbølgerne og modvindsbølgerne ramte hinanden. Spændende med mærkelige bevægelser i kajakken, der nærmest rystede fra side til side. Og det blev ved fra ca. halvt inde i krydset til vi var i læ af Kongsøre.

IMGP2455Ved Kongsøre svingede vi mod nord med kurs mod Lommestenen. Jeg har ikke været der før, men der er mange borde og bænke i området, så det er jeg vist den eneste, der ikke har. Kristian vidste ikke, hvorfor stenen blev kaldt Lommestenen, men den er ret stor, så det må være en mand/kvinde med store lommer, der har tabt den. Der var dog også andre sten i området. Blandt andet en sten med et påmalet anker. Jeg mistænker Frømændene for at så bag – mon ikke det er en lille markering af en morgenløberute i rullestenene i strandkanten. Det passer vist med en små 4 kilometer fra kasernen til stenen og retur.

Fremme ved Lommestenen, skulle den da lige rundes. Den ligger jo 20 meter fra strandkanten, så det var netop muligt at ro rundt om den. Der sad et par mennesker på stenen, der var vadet ud til den. Efter rundingen gik vi på land for at spise lidt frokost.

IMGP2457

Efter frokost var det tid til det lange kryds – i medvind. Og vi roede og vi roede. Turen tog lidt under 2 timer for de 12,5 kilometer inklusiv et par små pauser på vandet. De sjove bølger mødte vi igen, men ikke helt så udtalt, da vi roede nordligere og dermed med mindre påvirkning fra Lammefjorden. Men hvor er det kedeligt at ro med kurs mod Kyndbyværket. Værket er stort, så det virker som om, at man ikke nærmer sig. Men det gjorde vi selvfølgelig og i kom retur i god behold. Jeg vil dog bemærke, at en eventuel tur til Christiansø fra Bornholm kræver det helt rigtige vejr – og måske enddog noget musik i ørerne. Det har jeg ellers ikke gjort før, det med musikken, men 18 kilometer lyder meget kedeligt. Nu får vi se.

Jungedal til lommestenen nord for Kongsøre og retur
Isætning:   55° 48.924’N″ 11° 53.636’Ø
Optagning: —”—
Distance roet: 25,78 km
Vejr: 14 grader. Vind 4 m/s fra VNV. Solskin.

by KajakGal at May 24, 2015 04:08 pm

Kayak Yak
kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

Naked Guy Tackles a Canoeist

Yes, a video that is exactly what the title says. We believe in truth in advertising.


by noreply@blogger.com (John Herbert) at May 24, 2015 03:00 pm

SimonWillis.net
Cycling, sea kayaking and life in the Scottish highlands

New Book - Day by Day on the Pacific Crest Trail

I have published a new book - an account of our six-month 2,658 mile hike of the Pacific Crest Trail in the United States.

The book has its own website PacificCrestTrail.UK from where you can buy the book in four formats.

The thing that's different about this account is that it is written in the moment.  As we hiked, I wrote our evolving story, capturing a depth of feeling I doubt would be possible after the event.

With the success of Wild by Cheryl Strayed, both as a book and film, there's a lot more interest in the Pacific Crest Trail.  

Whereas we could start when we wished, I'm told departure slots are now allocated to space hikers along the trail.  It's a different world.

The PDF version and generic ePub file for all sorts of electronic readers are available at £2.99 from Digital Goods Store - just pick which file you want to download.

I hope sales will come through the Kindle Store - in the UK and it will also sell in the USA Kindle Store.  There are sample chapters on both.

I also used Create Space to make a hard, printed copy available to purchase.  However, with more than 150 colour photos the price of this print-on-demand version is much higher than I would like - £24.99 and $54.99 - and I'm taking virtually no profit for myself.  This was a real pain to layout but I learnt a great deal and the next book will be much easier to sort.

by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 24, 2015 07:00 am

Mackayak
What I talk about when I talk about kayaking.

Scottish Women's Paddle Symposium 2015

Ready to roll with my trusty Joe O paddles.
This year's multi-discipline symposium at Findhorn included whitewater paddling, open canoeing, sea kayaking and Greenland rolling. As everyone dispersed each morning to their launching points and to set up shuttles, we decided to stay close to our base . The strong breeze and occasional squall and cold shower,characteristic of the cold Scottish Spring weather this year, made our decision to stay close to our base at the village hall an easy one. An ideal location for all day immersion with the ability to retreat indoors when it all became a bit too chilly. 

Having the pier walls to observe from was really useful - looking down at body position gives a better mental picture of what you are trying to do.
Outdoor classroom - photo Kirsty Murfitt
The onshore breeze which meant a human anchor (Anne) was necessary to keep the kayaks from running aground on the beach during practice. The tide ebbed through the day within our comparatively sheltered little basin, but we ran out of water and grew too cold to continue at about the same time... 
Shore based Kirsty took some great images throughout the two days...


photo - Kirsty Murfitt
Starting off with the Avataq..


Deborah moves on to just holding the paddle...



 Once folk had discovered how important flexibility and body position is they understood how decks and BAs restrict movement, and decided to try rolling without a bouyancy aid 
- with dramatic results 
 voila!

With avataq and BA...
Photo: Anne Young                  
and without...
Photo: Anne Young.
Everyone achieved a lot over the two days, learning to brace and butterfly roll in conditions that were less than flat. Its great fun to help folk make the short journey from watching a demonstration and thinking "Yeah right! No way I will be able to do that" to floating about happily in a brace position, capsizing and opening up into a brace without using a paddle... and then realising it looked effortless because it feels effortless when it works. If these paddlers take their Greenland paddling no further than that I do think it will have altered the way they think about their relationship with the water, and immersion, when they are paddling.

Now looking forward to a slight rise in sea temps for Paddle Orkney, then balmy Bute in August.


by Mackayak (noreply@blogger.com) at May 24, 2015 02:52 am

May 23, 2015

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Rinøya check - og bort til Kjeøya. Ingen lik funnet...

Bent hadde en liten mission på Kjeøya utenfor Offersøy. Jeg slang meg med, og vi fant det likså godt å starte fra andre siden og få tatt posten på Rinøy med det samme. Siden vi ikke er storbegeistra for fjordpadling var det ikke så aktuelt å padle Hestfjorden i alle fall.

Men hva er det slags mission han skal ut på? Hammer, brekkjern og fil? What?

Bekkeblomen har nå kommet i blomst. Slett ikke så verst fin denne her, på en ellers smågrå dag så lyser den jo godt opp der den står.

Vi fant et sted like ved veien på Hestøya å sette ut fra.  Det kunne se litt langgrunt ut her, men den tid den sorg… Dalheimøyra satte vi ut fra.

Vi krysset rett over til Rinøya og lykta der.

Foto: Bent Bakkan
– Best å dokumentere Ti på Skjæret-posten mens man husker det, herved gjort.

Her ser vi innover den rolige Hestfjorden. Sikkert et fint område å padle i, ikke minst for ferskingser og godværspadlere.

Men så var det oss da, vi skulle jo en helt annen retning, for å få fullført Bents oppdrag. Oppdrag Kling Klang kan vi kalle den. Vi satte kursen rett mot vinden og håpet på økende styrke til returen.

Vi hadde ikke padlet langt før Bent hørte noe piping fra siden. Da var det ikke ternen heller, selv om vi snart kunne konstatere at den også nå er kommet. Da skal vel alle trekkfuglene være i mål her. Noen som ser hva pipingen er?

Det var litt for langt unna og for urolig til å få et godt bilde og filmen ble enda verre, men det er altså en diger oter som ligger og spiser på ei flyndre. Vi kom oss nedenfor den vindmessig, så den oppdaget oss ikke før vi var helt innpå, og vi fikk en god kikk før den ble fornærmet over forstyrrelsen og stakk.

Vi padlet videre, like målrettet, Kling Klang måtte gjennomføres. Med øyer og holmer foran var det ikke særlig til bølger, men motvind var det akkurat nok. Jeg var nemlig fri for Yt, og det var rimelig krise. (Egentlig ikke fri, men den hele flasken jeg hadde var ødelagt, viste det seg. Smakte pyton.)

Der! Kjeøya, og den sunkne fergen. Ingen som aner Kling Klang? Vi har vært her før, nemlig. 

På siden av ferga er det ei skipsklokke, kling klang. Noen synes den er veldig fin. 

Her skal ingen komme seg inn, avstengt med hengelås... Dette er altså ei gammel, sunket ferge. Ifølge Bent så har den gått over Sortlandssundet før det kom bru over der. Vanskelig å se det for seg kun ut fra styrhuset, for det er jo ikke større enn på en liten sjark. Men nå var det så klart i vannet at vi kunne se selve båten langt nedi havet, og den har åpenbart vært stor nok. 

Akkurat hva den heter har vi ikke ennå fått bekreftet, men det er enten Biltrafikk 1, Biltrafikk 2, nr 3, 4 eller 5… Noen mener at det sannsynligvis er Biltrafikk nr. 3. Veldig oppfinnsomt, altså.

Til min store glede oppdaget jeg at deler av kaia gikk laaangt innover, med mulighet til å padle inn imellom. Det sto imidlertid ikke sånn kjempebra til med den kaia, mange steder så det sånn her ut. Helt tært av.

Her kunne jeg funnet et lik, men det viste seg heldigvis å bare være en redningsvest av den eldgamle typen.

Kule farger og formasjoner innunder kaia, bare så synd at det blir så dårlig lys. Det gjør det vanskelig å ta bilder, blir fort uskarpt. 

Mission Kling Klang ble ikke fullført, av tekniske årsaker. Her er vi derfor på retur, og lurer på om det er kort å bære kajakkene over her. 

Foto:Bent Bakkan
Ganske langgrunt på denne siden i hvert fall.

Bent går opp og sjekker, det var lenger opp dit enn jeg trodde. 

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Eeeeehh...

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Nei, her gidder vi ikke å bære over. Vi padler rundt.

Bent frøs så han duret av gårde tilbake til bilen for å få varmen i seg, mens jeg tok det med ro siden jeg var så sulten og tørst. Hersens Yt som var ødelagt.

Å neeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeei. Her var det langt å gå tilbake til bilen. *Dette gidder jeg ikke*

Heldigvis hørte jeg en liten elv, så jeg kunne faktisk vasse opp med kajakken på slep et godt stykke. Ellers er jeg ikke sikker på at jeg hadde kommet meg hjem før floa kom, he he.

En grei start på pinsa, dette. Og nå har jeg tatt en post i Hadsel, en i Bø og en i Lødingen. Det er litt kult, da får jeg vel fortsette med en i Sortland neste gang.

by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at May 23, 2015 04:52 pm

KayakQuixotica.com
Tilting At Waves

One Kayak To Rule Them All

vulturesSo here’s the thing. I’m sick of collecting “stuff”. It’s not necessary, affordable or cool to pile up “things” be it kayaks, cars or stand-up boards. These days I find myself trying my best to refocus on what is important to me and, as the love of my life often says, “Unburden myself.” When it comes...
Read More

by derrick at May 23, 2015 02:31 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

Sony actioncam extra batteri

Original batteri till Sony actioncam kostar en bra slant. Nu finns det dock ett billigare att köpa på Kjell & company för 250 kr. Jupio

image

Postat med WordPress för Android

by Bengt Larsson at May 23, 2015 09:29 am

Kayak Yak
kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

Kayaking on the Hudson ends in tragedy and charges laid

This is one story for which more is going on than heard in the first news reports. It seems that on a warm Sunday afternoon April 19 a couple went kayaking on the Hudson River in New York state. They launched at Plum Point Park at 4:15 pm to head a kilometre or two across the river to Bannerman Island. Only one of them survived to return; some days later, she was charged with second-degree murder. There's an article from the New York Times on the topic.

by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at May 23, 2015 07:49 am

kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul
tid utomhus räknas. Tid i kajaken räknas dubbelt

Fyrömorgon

 Go start på en lördag. Finfin morgon på Valö. Snart dags för arbetshelg. Lite blåsigt och precis lagom med moln :)

   

Inlägget Fyrömorgon dök först upp på kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 23, 2015 06:39 am

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Øvelse RS Knut Hoem

Sist onsdag hadde Vesterålen Padleklubb øvelse på Myre, sammen med redningsskøyta Knut Hoem. Jeg skal jo helt sikkert poste bilder og blogge det, men... Det har vært full uke, padling i dag og nå er det pinselanghelg så... Det får vente. Man kan ikke sitte inne i ok padlevær, for å blogge forrige padling eller padlinga før.

Så her er en film fra øvelsen, som dere får ta som en smakebit i mellomtida. Og så kom det i flere aviser, både BLV.NO og vol.no. Slett ikke verst.

by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at May 23, 2015 12:58 am

May 22, 2015

KayakQuixotica.com
Tilting At Waves

Spiderline

testI should have a category called “Whimsy” for those moments when I have no idea why i’m typing in the first place. It’s been what? Over a year since I’ve last posted on this blog? And really, if truth be told it’s been nearly 10 years since I had any idea what I was on...
Read More

by derrick at May 22, 2015 08:19 pm

On the Big Sea in a Little Boat
Trip reports and other kayaking related ramblings.

Aries

Last Sunday, we went down to Osprey Sea Kayak to get some work done on H’s kayak and Big Red. H needed her backband fixed and her deck lines tightened. Bug Red needed to get the rudder lines attached so that they stop falling off. Carl and Sam are our go to kayak repair people.

They also sell P&H kayaks, but that wasn’t part of the plan. I think P&H and I think Cetus and I was not keen on a Cetus. I really had my brain set on the Tiderace kayaks. Getting to New York was a hurdle I was prepared to jump.

When we pulled up I saw that Osprey had a used Nigel Foster Legend for sale. The Legend is a classic sea kayak and has always intrigued me, so I wanted to give it a try.

The Legend was fine. It fit me well. It turned OK for a touring kayak. The hull was in good shape. There was nothing about the Legend that made me change my mind about trying out the Tiderace kayaks.

As I got out of the Legend Carl slid an Aries 155 onto the boat ramp and told me to try it out. As soon as I backed into the river and turned the kayak, I knew it was a play boat. It spun around like a white water kayak. I paddled it around the river by the shop for awhile and was increasingly impressed. It not only turned like a dream, it went pretty straight when needed. According to H I was smiling the whole time I was paddling it.

After I dragged myself out of the kayak, I asked the obvious question: "Do you have any in stock?" They did have one: orange over orange with yellow trim.

Before I plopped down the plastic and gave up on the Tideraces, I had questions. The Aries is under 16 feet long; can it keep up with a pod of Ceti? Can it be packed up for a weekend of camping? I had read a few reviews, and knew that the reviewers thought the answers were yes. However, I wanted to hear it first hand from an actual Aries paddler. Carl uses an Aries 150 as his primary kayak. Carl and Sam both assured me that the Aries could keep up with a Cetus for most paddles and could carry enough gear for a weekend with some creative packing.

Like all kayaks, the Aries is about trade offs. The Aries is optimized for playing on the ocean and not for expeditions. It is at its best on bouncy water, surf, and dodging rocks. As an ocean play kayak, it is designed to have decent speed to get to the play spots and carry some extra gear. On an expedition, it is not at its best, but still OK.

So I pulled the trigger. It needed a keep strip and a compass, which was good since our car couldn’t carry three kayaks home...

I picked it today and took it for a break-in paddle on the Charles River in Waltham; it is the section of the Charles known as the lake district. The river is not the optimal place to paddle an Aries-the water is flat and there is not much to dodge-but that was sort of the point. I wanted to know that I hadn’t boxed myself into a corner with a kayak that was only good for the extreme stuff.

It was a nice paddle along this route. I did take time to play with turning and finding the edges. The Aries is a very turny kayak; I had fun just spinning it around a few times…. The straight line performance was good. The Aries didn’t feel particularly slow, nor did it feel fast. I spent most of the time trying to find issues and I could not really come up with one. The paddle was a nice confirmation that I made a solid purchase. I cannot wait to get it out on some real water….

by Eric J. (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2015 05:42 pm

Qajaq Rolls
Dedicated to the Art of Greenland Style Kayak Rolling

Traditional Inuit Paddlers of the Southeast Greenland Retreat

Last weekend, I had the pleasure of being invited to mentor at the Traditional Inuit Paddlers of the Southeast Greenland Retreat, TIPS for short. TIPS is held in South Carolina near the city of Columbia. This year it was held at the Youth Leadership Center, a facility run by Clemson University in Aiken SC.

TIPS is a Qajaq USA sanctioned event organized by Fran and Fern, two avid Traditional paddlers who have immersed themselves in the culture of Greenland Style paddling. Fran is a Qajaq USA board adviser and has been working alongside me on the Events Committee. I met her last year at Delmarva so it was good to catch up and discuss how things are progressing with our committee’s mission to revitalize the Qajaq USA events.

TIPS1

I flew into Columbia and was met by Fran’s husband, who turned out to also be the events official photographer. We drove the 40 minutes to the camp through lovely green countryside, with glorious blue sky and rising temperatures. Throughout the weekend the weather was spectacular reaching the upper 80’s Fahrenheit. There were two large dorm cabins, men in one and women in the other. At the center of the camp facing the lake was a large hall which we used for presentations, Allunaariaqattaarneq (Greenland rope gymnastics), the obligatory fund raising auction, and early morning yoga.

TIPS3

We I arrived there were already many people in the water so I jumped in alongside Dubside and Ed and helped people work on their rolling. It was my privilege to work with Gunnar Jentzsch who is a German national now living in Mexico. Gunnar was able to get a robust hand roll and throughout the weekend worked with all the mentors and I believe also got his Norsamik Masikkut (forward finishing norsaq roll). A very impressive feat, especially as he taught himself to roll from videos and reading.

I really liked how TIPS de-emphasized rolling and provided opportunities for forward stroke development, maneuvering, harpoon throwing, ropes, paddle making, as well as presentations on history, Greenland competition etc. This really allowed the attendees to get a rounded view of Greenland style kayaking.

TIPS2

TIPS is the youngest and consequentially the smallest Qajaq USA sanctioned event. That comes with the disadvantage of a smaller budget, but the huge advantage that everyone became family, and were able to experience all aspects of the event. At one point over half the attendees were in the lake learning forward finishing rolls, while the other half were learning forward strokes.  Many thanks to Ed, Dave and Dubside plus of course Fran and Fern for all their hard work in making this such a treat to be a part of. I hope to be back at TIPS soon.

TIPS4

Images courtesy Chuck Symes

by Christopher Crowhurst at May 22, 2015 04:14 pm

Gnarlydog News

GEAR: cheap light stoves

. There are a few things easier than cooking on a gas stove when camping, eating cold food is one. I love the simplicity of canister gas stoves: turn the control knob, light the flame and we are "cooking with gas" I have made a previous post about the virtues of compact gas stove here. I have since updated my stoves and opted for something that is stable but still light. I prefer to cook with

by gnarlydog (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2015 02:04 pm

Sea kayaking with seakayakphoto.com
Imagine you are at the edge of the sea on a day when it is difficult to say where the land ends and the sea begins and where the sea ends and the sky begins. Sea kayaking lets you explore these and your own boundaries and broadens your horizons. Sea kayaking is the new mountaineering.

Breaking out of Cruib Lodge before dawn.

Tony and I rose before dawn on the shores of \West Loch Tarbert on Jura. We had spent a comfortable night in the middle room of Cruib Lodge a recently restored bothy. It was locely and dry and the whitewashed plastered walls gave it a sense of luxury lacking in many bothies. After breakfast we tidied everything and left the place spick and span for the next visitor.  Then it was

by Douglas Wilcox (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2015 01:54 pm

Kanotisten.com
Kajak, Foto,Friluftsliv

Sony MPK-AS3

Nytt hus till Sony HDR -AS 200 V. Trist att man måste köpa ett speciellt hus för att den ska filma med bra skärpa under vattnet. 500 kr.
image

 

sony2000

by Bengt Larsson at May 22, 2015 12:24 pm

Kayak Yak
kayaking the We(s)t Coast of British Columbia

Victoria paddlers find new paddle partner

There's a heartwarming story on CBC radio today, about a group of Victoria paddlers who found a message in a bottle while training in the Inner Harbour. The message said to please put the bottle back in the water -- "my last wish was to see the world." The bottle also contained dusty ashes and a photograph from a man's Celebration of Life. (The story is reminiscent of the National Film Board film Paddle to the Sea by legendary canoeist Bill Mason.)
The paddlers knew that currents in the harbour aren't likely to carry the bottle out right away, so they've resolved to bring the bottle with them when they leave on a paddling trip to Alaska. That seems like a good start to seeing the world!
Click here to read the story on CBC news, with quotes from Russell Henry and photos of the bottle and the paddling group. That page also has a link to the CBC Radio story, with an audio recording of All Points West show host Robyn Burns interviewing Russell Henry, and here you can find another news story with an embedded video.

by noreply@blogger.com (Paula) at May 22, 2015 06:55 am

SimonWillis.net
Cycling, sea kayaking and life in the Scottish highlands

Keeping Cycling Data in Sync - Strava, FitBit and MyFitnessPal

Runners & cyclists record data from different devices, many of which won't 'talk' to each other.  This is my system for keeping it all in sync with a separate back-up. If your chosen application isn't listed, don't despair because you'll find an idea in this which will probably work for you.

Oh - and this could all change once the Apple Watch comes out.

I have three 'sets' of devices; Garmin devices record my cycling and running; a Fitbit Flex stays on my wrist throughout; a Withings Smart Body Analyser records my weight and fat %.  I log my food on MyFitnessPal.

When I want to see my workouts diary I open Strava.  

When I wish to see how active I've been outside of specific workouts, yet still including those workouts, I open Fitbit.

When I need to know how many calories I have left I open MyFitnessPal. 

Just about everything uploads automatically (except cross training like yoga or weights) and the workouts are backed up in two places - they're uploaded to Training Peaks and a backup copy saved to my Dropbox.  

It's almost all entirely free.

If you don't want to read the details of the devices I'm using, scroll down to KEEPING IT ALL IN SYNC.

RUNNING, CYCLING AND SWIMMING        
Most new Garmin devices automatically upload via Bluetooth to a free Garmin Connect account.  I use a Garmin Edge 1000 for cycling and a Garmin 220 for running.  

I'm thinking about a Garmin Swim to complete the set (currently I upload swim sessions manually).  

Despite recent improvements, Garmin Connect remains a clunky interface compared to Strava.  But it's easy to link the accounts so, in effect, my ride and run data is automatically uploaded to Strava. 

Strava is my main training diary.  So I then open Strava to change the name of the workout but that's not necessary.  I also manually log in Strava yoga, weights and other workouts not recorded by the Garmin.  

DAILY ACTIVITY
It's easy to overeat when training, either rewarding a workout or thinking you need more calories than you really do.  On rest days it's even easier.
 
My Fitbit Flex records daily activity.  

On a rest day, when I need to know how active I've been or how well I've slept, I open the Fitbit App on my iPhone. 

The main role of the Fitbit is to record how active I have been when not cycling or running.  

When filming I can easily walk over 20,000 steps a day - very active.  

When editing or writing it's more like 5,000 steps.  That hugely changes how much I should eat.

CALORIES IN-AND-OUT
MyFitnessPal is simply the best way to track food intake, whether it's as simple as counting calories, or more involved like divided up into carbs, protein and fat.  


Work out how much you should be eating and input that as a daily goal.  Link the account to Strava and Fitbit and your calorific needs are automatically increased or decreased in line with your level of activity. 

On hard training days, you'll know how many more calories to eat.  On particularly sedentary days your intake will even reduce as Fitbit determines you've been less active than normal.

Logging your food intake obviously helps!  In the early days it was difficult to find British foods and measurements in MyFitnessPal, but now it's easy.  True, it is harder to enter a home cooked meal than a a shop-bought ready meal (for which the nutritional information is provided on the packet and someone has probably already entered into MyFitnessPal).  Weighing and apportioning all the individual ingredients is going too far, even for me.  

Yet I find it easy to record everything else I eat during the day, from breakfast to evening snack, so I have a fair idea whether I ought to eat a large or small evening meal.  In my view, the numbers don't have to be precise.

WEIGHT
I know if I have eaten too much by the next morning.  After my first loo stop I stand on my internet-linked Withings Smart Body Analyser.  

This automatically measures and record my weight, fat percentage (about which I'm doubtful), heart rate (which is long past resting so useless) and air quality (not needed here in the Scottish highlands). 

The results show on the Withings App within a minute or two but I don't need to look at it because it is linked to MyFitnessPal. 

KEEPING IT ALL IN SYNC
This is the stuff you want to know, right?  OK, here's how I do it.  

Step 1: Garmin recorded activities Bluetooth up to Garmin Connect which is linked to Strava.  I manually log other workouts on Strava so it is my training diary.  (Data only flows from Garmin Connect to Strava)

Step 2:  Link Strava to MyFitnessPal (data flows from Strava to MyFitnessPal)

Step 3: Link MyFitnessPal to Fitbit (two-way data flow).  This means workouts appear in the Fitbit App and, if you've worn your Fitbit while running, it knows not to double count.  Fitbit and workout data appear in MyFitnessPal and your daily calorie allowance is increased. 

Step 4: Link Withings to MyFitnessPal (data flows from Withings to MFP) and, like the workouts, your weight data will appear in MyFitnessPal and Fitbit dashboard.

Do not link Strava or Withings to Fitbit.  I don't know if this will lead to double counting but it could confuse things, and it's not needed.

BACKUPS AND MORE
I want backups so I use Tapiriik.com to automatically synchronise Garmin workouts with my Dropbox account, placing a .tcx file into my laptop and desktop computers.  



The free version of Tapiriik requires a manual sync but for $2 you can automate this - well worth the money and the only cash you'll spend in all of this process.  Tapiriik also synchronises to many other online accounts, but will only talk to a Premium version of Training Peaks, not the free version.  But there is a App which will…



The free FitnessSyncer.com account will take the data from my Strava account and synchronise it with my free Training Peaks account.  I keep this Training Peaks account for two reasons; firstly their online seminars are quite good and secondly, if I ever get a trainer, he or she will probably want to use Training Peaks.




It sounds complicated but it's not - it's really simple and almost entirely automatic in operation.

HEALTH KIT iOS
[Edit - thanks to Grant for pointing out in the comments below the App SyncSolver which syncs FitBit data to iOS Health Kit]

Until Apple sorts out Health Kit, then I won't use it.  I don't carry my iPhone everywhere - Fitbit is a much easier recorder (imagine doing Yoga with an iPhone attached!)  Yet Apple has made it virtually impossible to get Fitbit data into Health Kit.  Yes, Health Kit links to MyFitnessPal, which in turn links to Fitbit.  But Health Kit only imports the food data from MFP, not the activity data MFP acquired from Fitbit.  I've tried other work-arounds but the same seems true of other Apps that partner Health Kit.  Sorry Apple - for now at least, others are doing a better job so I won't be using you.





by Simon Willis (noreply@blogger.com) at May 22, 2015 07:42 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Plastic-Free? Nope, Not Me.


Not today, anyways. I tried. I did. Not sure whether it's funny or sad how I failed - maybe a little bit of both. Either way, it seemed worth sharing. I was doing so well up until the corn.

I haven't been making a big deal of this on social media or anywhere else, it's just been sort of a personal thing, but since I've gotten involved with the NYC welcoming committee for the Hōkūle'a when she stops here during the East Coast leg of her amazing Mālama Honua voyage, I've set myself a small personal challenge. Mālama Honua means "Care for the Earth" (well, it's a little more complex than that, but for the purpose of this post, the simplest translation will suffice) and I figured that if I was going to be involved with the effort, I should do something of my own to honor that.

I think that as Americans go (big qualifier there, of course), I'm not too bad. I've never owned a car; I mostly use public transportation or my feet to get from here to there; I don't fly a whole lot; except for my clock radio, I turn my electrical stuff all the way off when I leave home; NYC has done a good job of training people who live here to at least pretend we're recycling (I don't think they're anywhere close to actually re-using all of that stuff that we carefully sort and deposit in green or blue bins, but I think the idea is that eventually better use will be made of the stuff, and when that happens, the supply will already be firmly in place); I compost my veggie scraps at the club; and I mostly only drink tap water (and when I buy a bottled beverage I usually reuse the bottle as a water bottle numerous times - I know people freak about re-using but really, how much leaching is going to happen if you fill the bottle with water and then drink it over the next few hours?). I don't make a fetish of any of this, these are just things that are pretty easy to do when you live in NYC.

However, there's been one front on which I have been pretty lazy, and that is plastic use, so that's what I decided to work on for my own private little m
ālama honua. Biggest thing I've done is lunch-related; we have a pretty good cafeteria at the Really Big Children's Publishing House, and I get lunch up there pretty regularly. I usually have lunch at my desk, and I used to always bring the food down in one of those disposable plastic clamshells. These days, I've begun bringing a clean reusable container up and asking to have my food put in that. I felt a little weird doing that at first but the cafeteria folks don't seem to have any problem with it at all. Nice. I did get in BIG trouble at the Duke's Cafe deli on Broadway one time when I tried to use the same container at their salad bar - I don't know how walking up to the salad bar and filling a container that's actually slightly heavier than the clamshells they use could possibly be a problem, but evidently it was, I had to beg the cashiers to sell me the food I'd put in it just this once ("No, please, I promise I won't do it again!") instead of throwing it (and my container) in the garbage - they were THAT freaked out. Ah well, win some lose some, it was worth a try at least. 

I've also been stricter with myself about grocery shopping when I don't have a bag. I've done this in a halfway fashion for a long time, bringing bags if I was planning on shopping, but if I ended up shopping unexpectedly, I would take the proffered plastic. Since most of my spontaneous shopping ends up happening in the four blocks between the subway station and home, that's just plain lazy, it's so easy to go home and get a bag, so that's what I've been having myself do. I have this apparently inexhaustible bag of bags under the sink so I'm using those more, plus I find myself carrying a bookbag (one that can serve as a grocery bag if the groceries aren't messy) a lot more since I started in on this.

I've been doing this for a while. Again, I'm not making a big thing out of it, I haven't got the heart of a purist, but I am trying to be more thoughtful about these little throwaway plastic thingummies that are so ubiquitous in our lives. Today, though, after a banana for breakfast (skin will go to compost) and a lunch in my reusable tray, and knowing that I had leftovers in the fridge at home, it began to dawn on me that I might actually pull off a day where I neither purchased nor disposed of any plastic, which I thought would be pretty neat. It ended up being a late night at work, I had to fight off the temptations of all the plastic-wrapped snacks and goodies in the vending machines at work and the bodegas on the way home, but I made it all the way home (woohoo!) where I went straight to the fridge and pulled out the leftovers. Spare ribs and rice. I decided I needed some veggies too and all of the sudden -- OH NO! --there I was holding an empty plastic bag in my hand.

So much for my no-plastic day - it was trickier than I thought! I'll have to try again sometime. Stupid corn. 

(ok, I wasn't THIS upset)

by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 22, 2015 03:28 am

May 21, 2015

Paddle California
Thoughts from the world of kayaking centered in California. Ocean, whitewater, flatwater, wherever the paddling takes me. Trip reports, gear reviews, teaching and leadership, with pictures and video.

The Art of Sea Kayaking




People seemed to enjoy my Art of Whitewater, so I thought I'd give the same treatment to ocean paddling. This is the start of a series of posts covering what it takes to paddle on the open ocean. I'll discuss the techniques and ideas I feel are important to understand in order to safely paddle in exposed areas. Many of these things are covered in typical classes, some are not, but I know that lots of paddlers learn through experience. That's great, but it's still a good idea to know what you should be learning beforehand instead of merely learning in hindsight. As parts are added, these links will go live:

Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: Technique
Part 3: Rescues and Rolling
Part 4: Surf Zone
Part 5: Awareness/Judgment
Part 6: Forecasts
Part 7: Seamanship
Part 8: Working With the Water
Part 9: Rock Gardening

Introduction

The Theory

Once again, these posts are primarily aimed at an intermediate crowd, designed to relate what skills, and more importantly what knowledge and awareness I feel is required to paddle on the open ocean. I’m going to assume people know their basic rescues (solo and assisted) and strokes, and have some time paddling in protected waters. If you're just starting out in this sport: take a class, a full day introductory class that includes practicing rescues in the water. That will get you going, then spend some time paddling on small lakes, calm harbors, or flat bays with no current. Then come back and read more. This series will focus on getting more out of your paddling, being safe on the water, and ways to continue to develop and improve.

A few words of warning before getting into things: the ocean can be dangerous. In whitewater, people start knowing the river can be dangerous and this naturally leads to some caution as they advance. The ocean can fool ya – it often looks as calm and gentle as the peaceful lake you’re used to. Beginners often head out in conditions that are well within their abilities. But the ocean is fickle. Winds can rise dramatically, currents can form out of nowhere, swells can increase in the blink of an eye. Don’t venture out into the open ocean unless you can handle the worst that could come your way. Have the skills I’m talking about here, or go with someone who does and is capable of assisting you. In any given conditions it takes more skill to help someone else than merely take care of yourself, so choose your paddling partners wisely.

How do you find the right people to paddle with? There are lots of great clubs across the country, so look up your local group and check them out. Don't assume because someone is in a club that they are a skilled and knowledgeable paddler (especially if you found them on Meet-up). There isn't safety in numbers - there's safety in safe numbers. A large group of unskilled people is just a larger disaster waiting to happen. Talk to people before you paddle with them, find out about their experience, ask others in the group about who initiates paddles and what their reputation is. Your safety is your responsibility and never hand it off to someone without knowing who you're giving it to.

Start by paddling with new people in places and conditions where you feel comfortable and are not relying upon them. The best place and time to find out what you and your paddling partners will do when something goes wrong is before it happens. That simply means practicing. If it's a club, make sure that people have regular practice sessions (and maybe attend a couple). If it's a new group of paddlers you're joining, ask when was the last time they did rescues. People who don't practice, people who say they never fall in, are the ones most likely to be in serious danger when a minor incident happens. Don't be one of those people. Practice what you learned in that first class.

The Practice

For now, let's say that you need to practice the basics. The simple stroke technique that you learn in that one-day class is enough to keep most people growing and improving for several months. The rescues need to be done a dozen times before they're solid and familiar enough to perform when needed. So start with the simple mindset that if you want to paddle more challenging waters and in rougher conditions, you need to work at it. I'll cover more of exactly what skills you need to practice as the series continues, but for now let's talk a bit about what equipment you'll need if your goal is coastal paddling. 

To begin with, dress appropriately. Unlike the river or most lakes, swimming to shore isn’t always an option. Even on a warm, sunny day, most ocean waters are well below human body temperatures, and hypothermia is a serious risk even in seventy-degree water. The most common sea kayak tragedies involve people starting out in fine weather, getting caught in changing conditions, and getting too cold due to poor clothing choices to save themselves or survive until rescued. Dress for immersion. (Here's a website with good information on what cold water does and how to prepare for it: National Center for Cold Water Safety)

The right gear goes beyond clothing and includes what you're paddling and what you bring with you. Rec boats are designed for protected water, sea kayaks are designed for the sea. These days there's some blurring between the categories, but there are a few things any ocean-going boat should have, starting with flotation. Whether it's internal bulkheads that create a front and stern air chamber, or inflated airbags that fill up all the space, your boat needs to stay reasonably buoyant on both ends even if it fills with water. It should also have deck lines - something strong for you to grab onto to climb back aboard - as well as toggles at both ends - to help you swim the boat if you're in the water and need to get yourself and your ride to someplace safer before you get back in. Before you head out always make sure that there are no major leaks, that hatch covers are on tight or floatbags are fully inflated. The sinking feeling you get when your boat is sinking is not a pleasant one, especially if you're miles out to sea. (Here's a post I wrote a while ago on different boat types: Calkayakl)

In addition to the basics of paddle, PFD and sprayskirt, there are some additional items that should be with you when you're going out farther. Take a light/headlamp, even if you're sure you'll be back well before sunset. Take some flares - it's a requirement if you're a mile off shore but a good idea no matter how far you go. The cheap pencil flares are pretty much worthless, so splurge for a parachute flare which really works. A VHF radio is another essential safety item, especially one with the new DCS emergency beacon feature which transmits your GPS location to rescuers automatically. And people often overlook it, but a simple whistle on your PFD that's always ready is probably the emergency signal that is used the most - so make sure you have one (it's another Coast Guard requirement anyway).

A few other pieces of kit that can come in really handy: a spare paddle, extra clothing, food and water (a thermos full of warm soup can literally be a life saver), a tow rope, GPS/Satelite Tracker, first aid kit, repair kit, and a helmet if you're going to be paddling near any rocks. I know it can seem like a long list, but I have a drybag filled with most of those items and I simply toss it in my hatch every time I go out, even if it's just a short paddle, even if I'm sure I won't need it. You don't have to go very far to be in serious trouble if you break a paddle or crack a boat, and the difference between having what you need to deal with the situation and struggling to get back home can be hours and serious danger levels.

The open ocean is an incredible and beautiful place. I think pretty much any type of kayaker will enjoy the experiences you can find out there - if you are prepared and know where to look. Hopefully this series will help you get there. As usual, let me know if you have any questions or thoughts on the topic.

by Bryant Burkhardt (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 07:40 pm

The Art of Sea Kayaking: Technique


This is part of a series of posts covering what it takes to paddle on the open ocean, exposed to swell and away from easy landings. I'll discuss the techniques and ideas I feel are important to understand in order to safely paddle in such a dynamic environment with the focus on how to approach thing instead of simply how to do things. While my intention is to help guide folks who are newer to the sport and possibly neophytes on the ocean, I hope some of the wisdom I share gives even the most seasoned paddler more to think about. Many of these things are covered in typical classes (some are not), and I highly encourage instruction from a skilled teacher. But I also know many paddlers learn through experience - properly so - and hope these concepts will lead to better experiences.

There's a sequence to these posts for a reason, so if something seems unfamiliar try starting at the beginning. Make sure to read the disclaimers and warnings in Part 1: Introduction. And feel free to ask any questions or share your own thoughts in the comments.

Part 2: Technique
Part 3: Rescues and Rolling
Part 4: Surf Zone
Part 5: Awareness/Judgment
Part 6: Forecasts
Part 7: Seamanship
Part 8: Working With the Water
Part 9: Rock Gardening

Technique

The Theory

As with whitewater, we start with technique. What is really required for ocean paddling? First and foremost is the forward stroke. The vast majority of paddlers work much harder than they have to and are not nearly as efficient or fast as they could be. You’ll spend 90% of your time paddling using your forward stroke; you’ll take one thousand strokes for every mile you cover. You don’t have to be perfect, you don’t have to have a racer’s form, but if you apply the basics of torso rotation you’ll be ahead of the crowd (quite literally).

That’s really what’s important: the basics. There’s a million little points and tweaks that will help eke out a tiny bit more speed, but all most people need are the fundamental concepts that you learn in your first day of kayaking. The power comes from your torso – make sure to wind up before planting the blade in the water. Get the blade in the water early (by your toes) and make sure it’s fully submerged. Once the blade is anchored, unwind your torso, keeping your top arm level (somewhere around chin height – high angle or low angle isn’t that important; you’ll find what feels most comfortable to you). Take the blade out at your hip – you lose efficiency when the stroke goes behind you. This should leave you wound up for the next stroke, and you repeat on the other side. The strength comes from your core, even using your legs to push on the same side as the stroke to help your rotation.

Here's a quick article and video from my friend Sean Morley that lays it out beautifully:
http://www.canoekayak.com/skills/virtual-coach-power-paddling/

One thing worth mentioning is that many folks with good technique in the harbor lose it when they hit the swells and bumpy conditions of open water. But a strong forward stroke is actually one of the best ways to brace on the water – the power and support that comes from good technique will make you much more stable. Spend more time practicing on flat water and it will help you when things get rough.

To prepare for that rough water, people often spend a lot of time on bracing. Truth is, I hardly ever brace while paddling. You shouldn’t have to. But it’s in the learning how to brace that you discover the skills you really need: edge control and loose hips. Learning how to put your kayak on edge, and more importantly how to paddle and do whatever you need while your kayak is on edge is a necessity for paddling in rough waters. Controlling your edge gives you more directional control, but even more importantly it teaches you how to let your kayak lean with the waves and how to bring it back upright when you need to. The ability to disconnect your upper body from your lower allows the kayak to roll (slightly) and respond to the waves while your upper body stays relaxed and your center of gravity stays over your boat.

Like most things, it’s easiest to start in flat water. A lot of folks think of edging with their knees – pushing up on one and down on the other - or maybe using their hips. That’s fine, but also concentrate on using your body weight. Try to make one cheek heavier than the other. Use as little muscle as possible – the more relaxed you are the more stable the boat becomes.
So I’m not even going to talk about bracing technique (yet – we’ll visit the topic when we reach the surf zone). But definitely DO practice your bracing, just make sure the focus is on the lower body and the kayak, not the blade.

There are some other techniques that are good to know. In addition to the bracing I mentioned, there’s different rescues and rolling. They’re worth their own full discussion, which I’ll get to shortly, so I’ll just mention here that I believe if you paddle on the ocean you need to have a solid solo rescue option. Assisted rescues are great – normally faster and easier – but don’t count on your friends out there. They might be too busy trying to save their own ass to help you out. Be realistic and make sure you can take care of yourself.

Cross-bow draws, low brace turns, side-slips – all those advanced strokes are great but not a single one is necessary for paddling in open water. Learn them, have fun with them, but if your goal is to get out on the ocean, use them to develop boat control and body control so you can stay relaxed and comfortable while the ocean does its thing. You’ll get more use out of your basic sweep strokes.

One steering stroke that’s worth mentioning is the stern rudder. It’s quite easy and very efficient, especially paddling down wind or down-wave, but so many people do it poorly and end up avoiding it. The key to an efficient rudder is getting the blade parallel to the boat. It’s not a reverse sweep. Rotate your body, get the whole paddle on one side with the back blade fully submerged and vertical. Simply extend your back hand while keeping the front one still at shoulder height. The faster you’re moving the more powerful the stroke is, and done properly it takes little effort and produces almost no drag.

More important than any single technique is the simple attitude of trying to improve. If you make a conscious effort and spend some time dedicated to improving how you do things, you will find that it makes a difference as to where you can do things. The more you want to paddle in rough water, the more you want to visit exposed coastlines, especially if you want to play around the rocks, solid fundamentals will get you much further than anything else. If you want to get to Carnegie Hall…

The Practice


I’ve taught a number of forward stroke workshops, where people spend an entire day just working on their forward stroke technique, and I’ve assisted some of the best instructors out there, world champion racers and high level coaches. Such courses are great, and I see people make quick improvements during the day, but when I go paddling with people it’s not the ones who’ve taken the most classes that lead the pack – it’s the ones who’ve practiced. A half-way decent forward stroke, done consistently and on a regular basis, will beat out that top-notch technique you accomplished for a brief period while supervised and never seen again. And it’s so easy to practice – you’re going to be using the stroke anyway so why not try to improve it? All you have to do is put a little mental effort into paying attention to what you’re doing every time you go out.

Your best practice will come when your body is relaxed and you feel comfortable in your boat, so work on your stroke at the start of your paddle, maybe while in protected waters or before the wind comes up. At the end of the day, when you’re tired and just want to get home, it’s a little harder to focus on form. Be aware that something new always feels different – so don’t expect improvement to immediately feel better. What you want to focus on is that the feeling is correct – that you feel your core muscles activating, that your arms seem fairly relaxed without a lot of pushing or pulling, that the blade feels anchored in the water, not sliding through it. Know what your body and the boat should be doing, and even if it feels a little odd keep with it. You’ll soon feel the difference in your speed and have more energy at the end of the paddle.

Flat water is also where to start with your edging. Stationary drills are alright, but try to focus on moving and doing other things while you edge. Simply holding the edge and paddling a serpentine course is a great way to work on skill and control while still heading towards your destination. Use some stern rudders to help change direction. See how they combine with sweeps. When one thing feels comfortable, try blending it into another: sweep stroke into a bow draw; forward stroke form while holding an edge. Combine things and see what happens.

And here’s where I think working on those ‘advanced’ strokes really pays off – you’ll never need to do a cross-bow draw, but the skill it takes to pull one off requires a fair bit of boat control so as you practice one thing you’re really learning several. Same for sculling braces. Go ahead and play around a little.

When you’re ready to try things out in a little more realistic conditions, start easy. Pick a windy day to go paddle in some chop. Find a marina where you can poke out around the breakwall to find swells but just as easily duck back in when you want. The best way to discover what you can handle and what you like is to try it a little bit at a time. Be prepared for some discomfort (or worse: seasickness) the first time you really paddle in swell. A simple part of practice is to experience the general conditions you ultimately want to handle while giving yourself an easy option to escape if things are a little too much for any reason.

But if you find you can handle the conditions, do more than just paddle – get back to practicing. See how different it is when you go downwind versus across it. Same with swell. You’ll find a good forward stroke does wonders for paddling into the wind, and solid edge control and an efficient rudder will let you fly ahead of your companions when traveling with the elements. If you’re too busy trying to survive to spare any thought or energy to your technique then you need to scale back and spend more time in mellower waters. It’s fine to occasionally push it, and even essential for improvement, but if that’s all you ever do you’ll find it takes longer to advance, and for most people it’s less fun-time and more fear-control.

At the end of the day, what you practice isn’t nearly as important as the fact that you do practice. Putting some conscious thought into your actions and doing so on a regular basis. It helps greatly if you have some fun while doing it (this is all supposed to be fun, remember?) and even better if your paddling buddies join in. There’s an old expression that it takes time in the seat to get better. True. But the rate of improvement depends greatly upon what you’re actually doing while in that seat. You don’t need to charge right out into the gnarliest conditions you can handle. It’s attitude, dedication, and persistence that pay off at the end of the day. 

Conclusion


While the better your technique the more you can get out of paddling, and sometimes the safer you’ll be as you do it, technique alone isn’t what makes a good paddler. What goes on in your head is much more important than what your body can do. I start with technique because it’s something you can work on as you start your career. There’s no need to wait, no experience needed before you can begin practicing. And the sooner you start, the more you work on it, the more it will give back.

by Bryant Burkhardt (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 07:39 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

NORCAL YAK
Northern California kayaking adventures

The season's future is now for California kayakers

Blue heron watches kayakers Wednesday at the San Juan Rapids, American River It sure didn't seem like a major drought on the lower American River this week. Flows that had been running around...

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by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 05:09 pm

Kayaking paradise found, then nearly lost to fire

 Before the fire, a typical view of Slab Creek Reservoir along the south shoreline There are many kayaking venues in Northern California with spectacular scenery, but perhaps only one where the...

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by Glenn Brank (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 04:36 pm

Freya Hoffmeister
Home of Freya Hoffmeister

Two TV interviews

Sat 1 15.05.2015

http://www.sat1regional.de/769.html?&cHash=9af23fe740708f64036b3df95269cc56&tx_ttnews%5BbackPid%5D=1&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=174566

RBB/ ZIBB 20.05.2015

http://www.rbb-online.de/zibb/vip/beitraege/freya-hoffmeister-zu-gast.html

by Freya at May 21, 2015 02:04 pm

kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul
tid utomhus räknas. Tid i kajaken räknas dubbelt

Intervju med en fästing

fasting

Tidningen Land har gjort en intervju med en fästing 

Fästingen: ”Jag har en självklar plats i ekosystemet””

Och så är det väl, minst lika självklar som vi tvåbenta paddlare :)

– Ni människor bits ju visserligen sällan men hela er livsstil gör många av oss djur inte bara sjuka, utan helt utrotade. Perspektiv, någon?

Fästingar kan bära på lite läskiga sjukdomar, läs mer på fasting.nu

Inlägget Intervju med en fästing dök först upp på kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 21, 2015 07:02 am

Frogma
Being the Continuing Adventures of a Woman and her Trusty Kayak in New York Harbor, the Hudson River, and Beyond. (with occasional political rants just to keep things lively!)

Lilac Art Series 2015 - a sampling

Here are a few shots from last night at the Lilac Arts Series. It's an interesting exhibit but I only saw part of it because for the first time ever in her time at Pier 25, the retired USCG buoy tender Lilac reached her official insurance-dictated capacity of 149 and there was a line to get in. I decided to leave to let somebody else board; I work not far away and I will come back on another day to see what I missed. The exhibit runs through August 15th, and it's definitely worth a visit!

Oops, note slightly later - just realized this wasn't much of a sampling, somehow I thought there was more art in here but mostly it's just the ship! I think it was just too crowded for good picture taking. All the more reason to go back, right? 

I finish here with a snippet of video of one of the exhibits - I didn't see everything but of what I did see, Lilac's Dream was my favorite. If you're going, it might be a bit of a spoiler. Click "watch in YouTube" to read more about the installation - it's very neat, what the artist did.  

by noreply@blogger.com (bonnie) at May 21, 2015 01:54 am

Mountain and Sea Scotland
Hillwalking and Sea Kayaking in Scotland

A seabird spectacle at Fowlsheugh


In spring and early summer the cliffs of north east Scotland are home to some of the largest concentrations of seabirds in Europe.  The sheer number of birds, the clamour and the smell of the cliff nesting colonies is one of nature's real spectacles whether viewed from land or from the sea.  On a day of sunshine and blustery showers we visited the RSPB's Fowlsheugh bird reserve, at Crawton a short distance to the south of  Stonehaven.





The cliffs here are indented by a couple of deep geos which give great views right into the heart of the seabird colonies. The air is a blizzard of wheeling birds at this time of year; dazzling black-and-white against a blue sea.....





...with colourful wildflowers and lichens adding splashes of brilliance to the green of the clifftops. 





The path along the cliffs starts with short rise to a viewpoint looking across to a cliff where Guillemots (Uria aalge), Kiitiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and Razorbills (Alca torda) jostle for position.  These three species in that order are the most numerous of Fowlsheugh's estimated 130,000 pairs of seabirds - and this is just on one small 2.5 kilometre cliff along a coast with many hundreds of kilometres of cliff nesting sites.

The shallow and productive North Sea is a rich feeding ground for the birds but all of these species and indeed most seabirds are in decline here for a variety of reasons such as declining fish stocks, the stormy weather of recent years and the gradual effect of climate change.





As we walked further along the cliff path there were fresh assaults on the senses around every corner.  The updraught brought us the screaming cacophony from the crowds below - and also the very distinctive smell of a seabird colony! In this geo we were able to clearly see birds diving from the surface and swimming down through the clear water.






Below us, every conceivable ledge and outcrop was absolutely crammed with nesting birds.  Guillemots and Razorbills are well adapted for this high-rise life; they lay eggs which are very sharply pointed at one end so that if one is accidentally kicked as a bird lands or takes off it will roll in a very tight circle and reduce the chances of it falling off the ledge.






That's not the only risk to the eggs and chicks though; predatory gulls and crows patrol the cliffs waiting for a chance to raid unguarded nests. The empty shells on the cliff path tell their own tale of loss for one bird being gain for another.






We were able to get really close views of birds which spend most of their lives well out at sea - it's even tricky to get close views like this from a kayak as the birds dive readily when approached.  The great advantage of reserves like Fowlsheugh is the chance to get close to the birds and share a part of their world.






There are fewer Razorbills but they still number into the thousands of pairs.  Blacker and stockier than the Guillemots, their strikingly marked bills make them easy to pick out in the crowd.

The predominant noise is the onomatopoeic calls of the Kiitwakes, a gentle looking bird with a raucous voice.  We were also privileged to watch a Fulmar laying her egg, picking at the Thrift flowers to place under her as she did so.

Among the hundreds of thousands of seabirds here, there are a tiny number who attract birdwatchers more than any of the other species; Fowlsheugh (the name means simply "bird cliff") is home to a few pairs of Puffins (Fratercula arctica) who nest on a slope on the cliff conveniently close to a good viewpoint.  As Puffins are burrow nesting birds they need a good layer of earth which is in short supply on the conglomerate cliffs of Fowlsheugh.  We were lucky to spot two of these characterful little birds - just two little birds among the many hundreds of thousands of other cliff residents but a great sight all the same.





Looking back along the cliff from the end of the RSPB reserve, the full height of one of the cliffs is seen to good effect. This isn't really a place to bring small children unless they're very well marshalled!




Looking north towards Stonehaven, Aberdeen and beyond, the cliffs go striding into the distance, many of them with their own seabird "cities" waiting to be explored.

A clifftop walk is rewarding at any time of the year, but in Spring it can be really special.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 12:07 am

Equipment Review - Kayak Carrier Systems Expedition Trolley

A trolley is one of the most useful sea kayaking accessories, the ability to move a kayak on a trolley can both reduce strain on the body and extend the flexibility of expeditions, offering additional route options.  There are two broad scenarios in which a trolley may be most useful; moving a kayak from a car to the launch site and to carry inside or on the deck of a kayak during an expedition.

In the first scenario a trolley is really useful if the launch site is any distance from the car, or if the tide goes out any sort of distance at your paddling venue.  If you are paddling solo then the advantage of a trolley should not be underestimated to save the effort of carrying even an empty kayak. 

In the second scenario a trolley can be used to portage the boat across land barriers, past difficult sections of water or canal locks, and of course, on and off ferries.  The ability to get a boat on and off a ferry extends the available route options and allows escape in deteriorating weather.  In my opinion, a trolley is pretty much essential kit if making a solo journey by kayak.

Some years ago I was on the point of purchasing a Kayak Carrier Systems (KCS) trolley from Mike Thomson at Scottish Paddler Supplies.  Following Mike's untimely death in 2008 the KCS trolley (which was designed and manufactured for Mike by Ronnie Weir) ceased production as Ronnie couldn't at that time take on the retail aspect of the business.  I was delighted to hear recently that Ronnie had restarted production and would retail direct via his website at Kayak Carrier Systems.  Even better, following comments from Douglas Wilcox and a couple of other folk, Ronnie had designed a new version of the trolley in which the original version had been widened and lowered, manufactured to an even more rugged standard and now featured an inbuilt stand to aid solo loading.  The redesigned trolley would be marketed as the "Expedition Trolley" to reflect its intended use.

The review below is a first impression report of the KCS Expedition Trolley - I intend to follow up with an extended use review after using it over several expeditions and a range of day paddles.

Conflict of interest statement:  I purchased a KCS Expedition trolley at full retail price.  I have had a small input in providing feedback in order that a couple of small design tweaks could be made but have no connection with KCS other than being a customer/reviewer.

The KCS Expedition Trolley is designed to be strong, light and durable - a difficult set of conflicting qualities to achieve.  It is designed to carry the weight of a fully laden sea kayak (or open canoe) over smooth or rough ground and to be easy to assemble/disassemble in order to transport it inside or on the deck of a kayak.

At present KCS products are sold directly via the website, and trolleys are available to demo at Glenuig Inn on Scotland's west coast and at Seaborne in Devon in the south west of England.



 


On opening the packaging the quality of the components used is immediately obvious.  The axle is high quality aluminium and fittings are either brass or stainless steel.  The legs are manufactured from the best available grade of polypropylene and have pads of closed cell foam to protect the hull of the kayak.

A real plus point is the spare parts kit supplied with the trolley.  Parts which might be misplaced in use such as T-Grips, a wheel retaining pin and the knurled locking handwheel are supplied as spares.  The spares kit is a thoughtful addition by a designer who is a paddler himself, and ties in with the "expedition ready" design brief.

A set of assembly and maintenance instructions, a securing strap and a strong drybag in which to store and transport the trolley completes the package.





Assembly is very straightforward; the pads (backed with strong polypropylene) secure to the frames with threaded T-Grips.





The axle is pushed through the frames and nylon spacers placed at each end. 




The frames are secured together with the knurled handwheel and the wheels can then be fitted and held in place with stainless steel gate-pins.  The wheels are the tried-and-tested 10 inch (25cm) wheels of the type found on many trollies and have pneumatic tyres fitted with Schraeder valves.  In use I've found it best not to fully inflate the tyres in order to give a balance between flotation and ease of pulling.  The single leg stand folds down from one side of the frame and makes solo loading of a kayak straightforward, the stand folds back up alongside the frame once the kayak is secured.





The trolley fits in an oval rear hatch with ease if the axle is removed.  Breaking it down further means that it can be fitted into a surprisingly small space (see the image on the KCS website which shows just how neatly the parts can fit together for stowage).  The wheels won't fit into a 20cm round kayak hatch, but fit into an oval hatch easily enough.






When journeying with a fully packed kayak the trolley can be broken down into two frames/axle/wheels and stowed in a storage bag strapped to the back deck.  The total weight of 3kg makes no discernable difference to stability on a loaded boat, but rear deck re-entry techniques may need to be adapted to take account of this or any deck cargo.





The optimum position for the trolley underneath the kayak will vary slightly from model to model and will be affected by kayak loading, but in general terms just aft of the cockpit gives a good balance.  Do take some time to practice securing the boat before heading out, it will be time well spent.

To secure a trolley I use the straps from my roof carrying bars which are longer than most.  The strap originally supplied with the Expedition trolley was slightly too short to comfortably secure a boat - when this was fed back to KCS a longer strap was immediately supplied and this is now standard.  A second strap running from the cenre of the frame of the trolley and up around the front of the cockpit rim will prevent any rearward movement of a trolley on soft sand or rough ground.






Following some trips with the Expedition trolley, the only criticism that Douglas and I could find was an occasional instance of the trolley rotating forwards under the boat on extremely rough ground or in very soft sand.  This could be mitigated by careful use of straps, but Douglas suggested a small rear extension for use on really tough terrain.  Ronnie came up with a design solution which has been successfully tested by Douglas on the trolley-eating portage across Jura and found to work very well in preventing any forward rotation.




The keel extension resembles a small aircraft tailplane and is now supplied as standard with the Expedition trolley.  It may not be required on most types of portage but underlines the expedition focused design and the willingness of Ronnie to adapt and improve an already good design.



Image by Douglas Wilcox

My first multi-day trip with the KCS Expedition Trolley included a portage with a heavily loaded kayak from the River Shiel to the sea at Moidart and took in a stretch of tarmac road....





.....and a bumpy estate track with some muddy sections.  It has also been used when day paddling to move a lightly laden boat across a variety of terrain.  In all situations so far it has performed faultlessly and has been easy to assemble and load in the field.



In my opinion the KCS Expedition trolley is a very high quality product and is unrivalled as a trolley for use on kayak (or canoe) expeditions. The quality of materials used make for a product which feels absolutely bombproof in use looks to be very durable.  The lower, wider design and subsequent small improvements make this the perfect trolley,and the addition of a single leg stand makes it particularly suitable for a solo user. In fact it is difficult to think of any way in which it could be further improved.

The current retail price is on the KCS website and is competitive when compared with other high quality trollies; the price also includes free UK delivery.

There will be an update to this review after I've had the opportunity to use the Expedition trolley as intended, on extended journeys which include rough and challenging terrain.  I have little doubt that it will prove as rugged and durable as the Scottish landscape itself!

For now, if you are looking for the best sea kayak trolley available  - look no further than this one.

by Ian Johnston (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2015 12:05 am

May 20, 2015

Sea kayaking with seakayakphoto.com
Imagine you are at the edge of the sea on a day when it is difficult to say where the land ends and the sea begins and where the sea ends and the sky begins. Sea kayaking lets you explore these and your own boundaries and broadens your horizons. Sea kayaking is the new mountaineering.

Repositioning the forward fin uphaul on the paddle sailing version of the P&H Aries 155.

I have several times left my friends standing while paddle sailing the Aries 155 with the forward fin deployed. In this photo Mike is being left further and further behind. Although he has a sail, our course is too much to windward for him to successfully deploy it. This is my secret weapon! The forward fin rotates on an axle and is pulled down by shock cord and raised by pulling...  .

by Douglas Wilcox (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 10:43 pm

Mike Jackson's Paddling Journal
A journal of my sea kayak trips.

May 20th - Cadboro Bay (#46

I went for an after dinner run around Cadboro Bay on the surf ski. A beautiful evening. I ran into Curran, SUPing with his dog, dropped by Heliomare to see if anyone was home and then zig-zagged around the bay a bit.
click to enlarge
6 km, YTD 384 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 09:15 pm

May 12th _ Cadboro Bay Greenland clinic (#44)

I led an evening clinic for 7 SISKA paddlers to introduce them to the Greenland paddle and provide tips on using it. The favourite paddle was the Superior Carbon - it just feels great to paddle! key tips included blade cant and getting the whole paddle wet (pinky in the water!). I forgot to turn the GPS on, so no track and an estimated paddle distance!
 2km, YTD 376 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 09:11 pm

May 17/18 - Clark and Sucia Islands (#45)

Monica and Jenny and I went over to the San Juans for the weekend and used the Scamper II inflatable to go to and from the shore and the C-dory. I figured that I clocked about a total of 2 km as each run usually required two trips to get the three of us ashore or aboard! Fantastic weather and the Scamper works quite well as a tender/dinghy for the c-dory.
2 km, YTD 378 km

by Mike J (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 09:11 pm

KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak » KajakGal - Oplevelser i havkajak

Evaluering af Havkajakroernes forårstræf

IMG_144520. maj 2015

I dag holdt Holbæk Kajakklub evalueringsmøde for arrangørere og hjælpere ved Havkajakroernes forårstræf. Men før det var klubben vært for en middag for både arrangørerne og hjælperne som tak for indsatsen. Der var både laks, salater og grillpølser med vin, så ikke et øje var tørt.

Efter middagen var der kaffe med chokolade og erfaringerne fra træffet blev vendt og vil blive tilsendt bestyrelsen i Havkajakroerne til brug ved fremtidige træf. Generelt gik træffet fint med en god planlægning, men der var dog enkelte skønhedsfejl, som andre kan lære af.

Efter mødet scorede jeg en kuglepen fra Havkajakroerne, men sig det ikke til nogen…! (Den blev faktisk udleveret).

by KajakGal at May 20, 2015 07:46 pm

Essex Explorations
Our membership is small…but that’s by design. Each of our explorers is a recognized leader in their respective field and brings a unique set of skills to the group. Whether a certified instructor, commercial guide, or in the case of our latest member, a professional photographer, each is passionate about explorations, pushing their boundaries, and then sharing that experience with others.

Bowman Bay

Situated just to the southwest of Anacortes, Bowan Bay is a beautiful tranquil little bit of water popular with campers and kayakers alike. But like most things in life just around a point it has an ‘opposite’; an even smaller and anything but tranquil bit of water – Deception Pass. The two play off each other beautifully.

Bowman Bay

Camera Settings

Bowan Bay

Until the late 1800s, this calm-watered cove was the site of a large Samish village, one of several that existed near Deception Pass.  Evidence of their presence in the area remains in the form of thick groves of Nootka rose that grow atop iron-rich shell middens. On a small sandspit you can find a wooden carving depicting the tragic princess that is part of their lore.

Before receiving its modern name, Bowman Bay was known as “Reservation Bay” due to the period in which it was a military reservation.  In the early 1900s, Bowman Bay was one of several modern-day park areas set aside for military use.  The area was eventually renamed in honor of Amos Bowman, who was one of the first white settlers on Fidalgo Island.  Nearby Anacortes is amalgamation of “Anna Curtis,” Bowman’s wife.  At the turn of the century, Bowman had a wooden dock built at the bay in hopes that it would become a major port, but Bowman’s dream was never realized.

To have faith is to trust yourself to the water. When you swim you don’t grab hold of the water, because if you do you will sink and drown. Instead you relax, and float. – Alan Watts

At least once a year, you’ll find the bay full of racers among every kind of paddle craft you could imagine. They’ve all came to test their paddling prowless against one of the most unique paddle races I’ve ever heard off. It starts and ends in the bay but the course is straight through Deception Pass. The start is always time to the tide race and whirl pools that set up in the pass. If you’re a strong paddler and on top of your game you’ll circle Strawberry Island and make it back with little issues, just a hard paddle. Miss the timing and you’re in a world of pain!

Search through the blog and you’ll see some footage I’ve taken of the race, but nope, I’ve never competed. Well above my pay grade! :-)

 

The post Bowman Bay appeared first on Essex Media & Explorations.

by Steve Weileman at May 20, 2015 12:48 pm

kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul
tid utomhus räknas. Tid i kajaken räknas dubbelt

Oru hopfällbar långkajak

Oru kayak som körde en mycket framgångsrik Kickstarterkampanj 2012 med sin plockepinnkajak drar nu igång en ny runda på Kickstarter, denna gång med en mer havskajaklik kajak. Klart kuligt. Man blir lite sugen, lätt att transportera och förvara om inte annat.

Mer hos Kickstarter, https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1975288517/the-coast-a-16-origami-kayak-for-adventures-near-a

Oru Kayak, which introduced its original 12-foot ‘origami kayak’ in 2012 with the most successful Kickstarter campaign in paddling history, is at it again.

This morning the company opened a new Kickstarter campaign with a pair of 16-foot models aimed at serious sea kayakers, the Oru Coast and Oru Coast+. In the first eight hours of the Kickstarter campaign, Oru raised more than $50,000–surpassing its $40,000 fundraising goal and assuring that the boats will go to market.

Källa: Kickstarter for New Oru Coast Folding Expedition Kayak | Canoe & Kayak Magazine

Inlägget Oru hopfällbar långkajak dök först upp på kajaknördar - paddling verkar kul.

by Erik Sjöstedt at May 20, 2015 12:15 pm

Sea kayaking with seakayakphoto.com
Imagine you are at the edge of the sea on a day when it is difficult to say where the land ends and the sea begins and where the sea ends and the sky begins. Sea kayaking lets you explore these and your own boundaries and broadens your horizons. Sea kayaking is the new mountaineering.

Lightly peated first night on Jura.

After we left the boathouse at the head of West Loch Tarbert on Jura we...  ...entered one of the remotest and least inhabited areas of Europe. As darkness fell we negotiated a series of dog legs that connect the inner loch to the outer loch. Our speed picked up to 10km an hour as dark cliffs and the twilight gathered round us we entered...  ...the final narrows before we... ...were

by Douglas Wilcox (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 11:01 am

Salish Strokes
I am a paddler, explorer, guide, and coach. Any day on the water is a good day, and I can't get enough.

Sunday Funday in Deception Pass

Sunday afternoon 7 of us headed north to Deception Pass for a sunny, flat, and fast 7.2 kt ebb. We found rocks to paddle around, and worked on attainments, ferry glides, and stern squirts (yes, in sea kayaks!).  There weren't surf waves or wind to work with- just a day in strong currents. 

We started out by exploring the headland between Bowman Bay and Lighthouse Point, hugging the shoreline and finding a few slots to run through. Even with the smallest of swell there were a couple that took quite a bit of maneuvering to make it safely through.
The group heading around Lighthouse Point.
Steve working hard to get in the slot.
Barb concentrating.
Once we got in the pass immediately I was swimming. 1- it was a beautiful day and it is always good to practice, and 2- it was BLOODY HOT in my drysuit. So first I did eddy turns from the back deck, forwards, backwards, and sideways, followed by a back deck static brace (no pictures of these, unfortunately). Then Steve and I turned his Aries 15.5 into a double, while facing each other. It worked marvelously, but was a little like paddling a log.

After this John and I got out and traded off taking pictures and video. There is a nice rock to stand on that forms the major eddy on the ebb, and it let us get up close and personal with kayaks!

I gave John a ride in the eddy.
Leslie breaking in.
Stern squirt- where you throw your stern into the current, let water pile on top of it, and in a whitewater boat, you throw ends! It is pretty awesome. A sea kayak isn't exactly a whitewater boat, but here is how Steve's attempt went.
Steve's Stern Squirt Pt.1 
Pt. 2
Pt. 3: the Finale.
Jill breaking in.
Low brace for balance.

Steve doesn't pay attention often...
Me working the eddyline.
Jill checking out the bottom.
Steve and I racing after a tennis ball like dogs.
Another beautiful day in the Pacific Northwest.




by donaldcheyette (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 10:49 am

Sea kayaking with seakayakphoto.com
Imagine you are at the edge of the sea on a day when it is difficult to say where the land ends and the sea begins and where the sea ends and the sky begins. Sea kayaking lets you explore these and your own boundaries and broadens your horizons. Sea kayaking is the new mountaineering.

The Jura portage, a miracle, an udder and the 177th Law of the Universe.

The key to our weekend trip to Jura and Islay lay in the timing of the strong tides in the Sounds of Jura and Islay and the fact that Jura is nearly bisected by... ...West Loch Tarbert in the west and Tarbert Bay in the east. The connecting isthmus is only 1.9km wide and 26m high. I had last portaged across here in 2007 but since then increasing knee dislocations a nasty accident to my knee

by Douglas Wilcox (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 10:08 am

Padlemia
En blogg om padling og annet friluftsliv i (hovedsakelig) Vesterålen

Kick-off workshoptur til Guvåghytta, del 2

Første del av kick-off-turen kan du lese om HER. Onsdag kveld var jo kjempetrivelig, såpass at det ble seinere kveld for min del enn jeg hadde tenkt. Jaja. Det var nå fint vær da vi sto opp, opphold og lite vind. Nåja, det kom vindrosser fra tid til annen, så man tydelig på havet – noe var det nok. Hm.

Dag var tidlig oppe og stekte eggegreier til flere, og gode greier. Stemningen var fortsatt god, selv om noen gruet litt for disse øvelsene. Velting og redninger, det er nå ikke så stor stas i kjølig maivann, den er jeg helt med på. *Hutre* Dessverre for noen er jeg vesterålsmester i unnskyldninger for å slippe sånt. Så jeg har hørt de fleste før, med egen stemme... (Men det er ikke tvang å øve redninger her heller altså. Bare nesten.)

Ti på Skjæret-bilde for de som er med på det. (y)
Jaja, det gikk helt fint å padle langs land, her var vi i le. Så hva som eventuelt kom ut av fjordene var ikke godt å si, men det var altså meldt 13 m/s utover. Men vi skulle jo øve på redninger og denslags! Her er gjengen mer og mindre klare til dyst. Aller helst slipper vi (meg inkludert) jo å bli våte i håret men... Det var jo det vi skulle – dessuten hadde jeg en mistanke om at vi uansett ikke ville komme lenger enn til "hjørnet" av Jørnfjorden uansett, før det ville bli for mye bølger evt. motvind. 

Vi padlet av gårde i trivelig tempo og med godt humør. Grått, men egentlig ikke så fryktelig kaldt. (Før vi kom i vannet. Der var det kaldt.

Først svingte vi en tur innom Guvåg, sånn at de som ville fikk tømt kajakkene sine, og noen gikk i land. Her kom vi oss forresten gjennom et sted jeg kun har padlet meg fast før. Kult. Enda var det ikke helt flo.

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Vi padlet bortover til den trange passasjen som er litt kul. Her er en del av gjengen på tur gjennom.

Det var ganske grått, og snart vått.

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Dag er klar.

Det var ei nokså vindstille bukt bortafor passasjen, så vi heiv oss like gjerne til der mens folk enda hadde motet oppe. Cowboy!

Tømming!

Velt og etter hvert kameratredning!

Enda en cowboy! Bra gjennomført med lavt tyngdepunkt og det hele – helt til han fikk krampe. Det hørtes ikke særlig kjekt ut. 

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Så var det tid for å friske opp litt selv. Det var lurt. For jeg hadde for en gangs skyld ikke sjekket ekstra om glidelåsen var igjen da jeg fikk hjelp med den – og da mangler det selvsagt en centimeter. Så jeg fikk vann i drakten! Da husker man å sjekke det HVER gang en stund framover, forhåpentligvis. (Nå er det veldig lenge siden jeg har begynt å padle med glidelåsen helt åpen, så det kunne vært verre, he he.)

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Det var ikke helt lett å få dratt Nordkappen nok opp til å få tømt den – den er visst veldig glatt. Men her har Kristin fått skikkelig tak, og tømminga går greit.

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Så var spørsmålet om jeg selv husker heelhook-varianten som jeg har prøvd å lære bort, når den skal gjøres i praksis…

Foto: Bent Bakkan
Bent  har ikke rukket å ta bilde imellom at jeg ligger i vannet og at jeg sitter oppi, så da går jeg ut ifra at det gikk rimelig kjapt...

Da var det nok for noen, så vi satte kursen tilbake mot Guvåg. Jeg hadde litt tenkt å kanskje padle litt mer rundt, men regnet i grunnen ikke med at det var så stort område å padle på. Det var mange med som ikke har padlet allverdens den siste tiden, så tror det var like greit.

Det ble jeg enda mer overbevist om da jeg kjørte hjemover. Dette er da INNERST i fjorden.

Godt med bølger allerede her. Bent padlet innover Eidsfjorden før han krysset over, han meldte følgende om forholdene underveis, etterpå:
«Fallvind langs fjellan på vestsida. Sterk straum ved innløpan både på Hell- og Melfjorden. Bølge innover og straum utover, med kulingkast opppå – skikkelig rotat, metershøgt skvulp.»
– Det ante meg. Tror værvarslet slo rimelig godt til denne gangen. Det kunne vært skøy, men jeg tror ikke de ferskeste hadde syntes det samme! Det er nå greit å ta det litt gradvis.

Vi kan vel slå fast at det ikke ble den solskinnsrike maituren jeg hadde sett for meg da jeg planla turen, men det ble like fullt en flott tur. En gjeng som gikk godt ihop og som hadde varierende erfaring på forskjellige områder, og de fleste kunne lære noe og få tips av noen. Særlig artig at en sånn som Bent som har padlet i mange år, gidder å komme på en ferskingtur og lære fra seg.


Jeg hadde en liten plan i backup for å ta opp diverse tema og sånt, men gruppa fungerte så fint at det syntes jeg ikke var noe poeng i. Når folk snakker om relevante ting og utveksler erfaringer og tips helt av seg selv, er det jo liten vits å stoppe det, for å belære om ett eller annet? Nei, dette ble akkurat sånn som jeg synes man lærer mest av. :) Kose seg på tur, samtidig som vi lærer av andre underveis – sånn uten av vi merker det.

Kanskje vi må sette opp en tur til neste år også? Men da må vi få til ei hel helg, sånn som vi egentlig hadde tenkt å gjøre nå. For mer tid til tur og avslapping. Det var bare ikke helger som passet, dessverre.

Takk for turen alle sammen, håper vi ses snart på neste tur.

by Miamaria Padlemia (noreply@blogger.com) at May 20, 2015 09:55 am